Global Food and Beverage Management Minor

Overview

This global food and beverage management minor provides students with the knowledge needed for the effective management of global food and beverage services in both the on-premises and retail sectors. Students will identify trends and develop an understanding of various aspects of the food, wine, beer, and spirit industries. Students will learn food and beverage management principles that demonstrate how providing exceptional service to their guests and customers can maximize profits in the hospitality industry.

Notes about this minor:

  • Posting of the minor on the student's academic transcript requires a minimum GPA of 2.0 in the minor.
  • Notations may appear in the curriculum chart below outlining pre-requisites, co-requisites, and other curriculum requirements (see footnotes).

The plan code for Global Food and Beverage Management Minor is FOODBEV-MN.

Curriculum for Global Food and Beverage Management Minor

Course
Required Courses
HSPT-173
Beverage Fermentation and Distillation
Exploration of traditional and emerging trends in fermentation and distillation of beverages. In addition to in-class lectures, group and individual presentations, this course will include visits to local businesses for hands-on experiences involving beer, wine, and spirits. Speakers will illuminate how decisions are made involving start-up, finances, the science involved in production, marketing, and more in their various industries. There will be tastings of wines, beers, and spirits. An individual innovative project allows in-depth exploration of wine, beers, and spirits in or outside their own field of interest. This provides practical applications for daily use in personal and business situations. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** Lecture 3 (Spring).
HSPT-215
Principles of Food Production and Service
Principles of Food Production and Service is a basic course covering food preparation methods, quality standards, food presentation, professionalism in food preparation and service, sanitation and safety processes in commercial kitchens, kitchen and restaurant organization and roles, and food service styles. Students completing this course should be able to function effectively in a kitchen or restaurant environment; including demonstrating professional appearance and behaviors; and knowledge of food preparation techniques, effective food presentation, food safety and sanitation practices, appropriate service styles, teamwork, and cleanup practices. Students are expected to achieve their required co-curricular requirement – the ServSafe Manager certification – by the end of this course. Lec/Lab 6 (Fall).
HSPT-335
Food and Beverage Management
This course will provide the student with the knowledge needed for the effective management of food service operations. Students will identify trends in the food and beverage industry, learn food and beverage management principles and understand how providing exceptional guest service can maximize profits in the hospitality industry. Topics will include food and beverage purchasing, inventory, costing, service styles, financial controls, menu design, sanitation, safety, ethics, food service automation, hardware and software, legal concerns, equipment selection, and service innovations in the design and layout of food establishments. (Prerequisite: HSPT-215 or equivalent course.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
Electives
Choose two of the following:
   ANTH-270
   Cuisine, Culture and Power
Physically, culturally, and socially, humans live through food and drink. Spanning the globe, as nearly limitless omnivores, humans have developed myriad ways of collecting and cultivating food and taking advantage of local environments. We also put food to work for us socially by creating cuisine. Through cuisine, we forge and nourish relationships, commune with deities, and through luxury choices, demonstrate our "taste" and lay claim to elite status. Through the cultural practices of production and consumption of food and drink, we wield power. Food and drink consumption patterns have sustained slavery, poverty, malnutrition, and illegal immigration, and have laid waste to the environment. In this class, we explore physical, cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of food and become more aware of how the private, intimate act of a bite connects us to the rest of humanity. Lecture 3 (Fa/sp/su).
   DECS-350
   Project Management
A study of the concepts and applications of project management. This course covers the organization and management of projects, including the role and responsibilities of the project manager, team responsibilities, tools and techniques for project planning, budgeting, and control, work breakdown, risk assessment, and project termination. The learning environment will include lectures and discussion, group exercises, case studies, and examinations. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 3rd year standing.) Lecture 3 .
   HSPT-153
   Foods of the World
This course is an introduction to the foods of many regions of the world. Indigenous ingredients and geographical influences on the development of each regional cuisine are included. Food customs and special food preparation techniques of the various cultures are addressed. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** Lec/Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
   HSPT-160
   Beers of the World
An introduction to Beers: history, the brewing process, distribution systems, production, flavor characteristics, partnering with foods, and handling and serving techniques. Beers produced from the major beer brewing centers of the world will be tasted and compared with similar brews form different countries. The way alcohol is processed in the human body is considered as well as the economic impact of brewing and distributing beer will be explored. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** Lec/Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
   HSPT-161
   Wines Of the World I
This course is an introduction to global wine history, vineyard methods, production techniques, grape characteristics, sensory evaluation, and marketing and distribution. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** Lec/Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
   HSPT-162
   Wines Of the World II
This course builds on what was learned in Wines of the World I. More in depth exploration of global wine history, vineyard methods, production techniques, grape characteristics, sensory evaluation, and marketing and distribution. Like its sister courses, Beers of the World, Foods of the World, and Wine and Food Pairing, there are weekly tastings and recommendations on pairings. This provides practical applications for daily use in personal and business situations. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** (Prerequisites: HSPT-161 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
   HSPT-163
   Wine Connoisseur
The majority of Wine Connoisseur classes will have guest speakers from the wine industry. Through class and lab work involving tastings, topics covered will include the technical aspects of viticulture and viniculture, the Three Tier System, health considerations, tourism, global regulations, wine competitions, cellaring and service, food pairing, public relations, marketing, social media, and trends. This provides practical applications for daily use in personal and business situations as well as co-op and job opportunities. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** (Prerequisites: HSPT-161 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 2 (Spring).
   HSPT-165
   Wine And Food Pairing I
This course is an introduction of pairing food with wine and other beverages. Students will experience "What grows together, goes together," and discover how regional wines and food pairings have a natural affinity for one another. Students will design their own menu and keep a tasting journal. This course experience includes sampling of food and wine, cooking demonstrations, and guest speakers. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** Lec/Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
   HSPT-171
   Introduction to Viticulture and Viniculture
An in-depth, hands-on exploration of vineyard practices, grape growing, and winemaking techniques. This course focuses on the cool-climate, Finger Lakes wine region and includes several visits to local vineyards, wineries, and businesses for hands-on experiences. Possible participation in aspects of harvest, processing of fruit, and winemaking processes while learning from industry leaders. Speakers will illuminate how decisions are made involving start-up, finances, the science involved in production, marketing, and more in their various industries. There will be tastings of grapes, unfinished and finished wines. A group winemaking project allows further exploration. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** (Prerequisites: HSPT-161 or equivalent course.) Lec/Lab 3 (Fall).
   HSPT-175
   Marketing Wine, Beer and Spirits
This course will focus on understanding how to develop a marketing strategy and plan to bring products to market. The specific focus will be on marketing wine, beer, and spirits. In addition to understanding how to build a marketing plan, this class will also analyze the trends within wine, beer, and spirits. There are field trips, guest speakers, and tastings of wine, beer, and spirits throughout the course. This provides practical applications for daily use in personal and business situations as well as co-op and job opportunities. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** Lec/Lab 3 (Spring).
   HSPT-225
   Hospitality and Tourism Management Fundamentals
Hospitality and tourism industry is one of the largest industries in the world. This introductory course provides students with an overview of hospitality industry and segments of travel and tourism. Students are introduced to career opportunities and skills needed to succeed in the specific hospitality and tourism fields. Students examine the growth and development of industry segments and their distinguishing characteristics, current issues and trends. Students will learn about the interdependence of the various industry players and the roles of these diverse participants within the industry. The concepts and practices of hospitality management are examined and discussed. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   HSPT-325
   Food Innovation Development
Students will explore their creativity through instructor- and student-planned food experiments involving sensory and objective evaluation of food quality, recipe development, problem-solving, experimental design, and written and oral communication of research. Individual research projects focus on assessing new ingredients or technologies, creating new products, and/or evaluating the marketability of a new product. This course is not available for audit. **Fee: Lab fee associated with this course** (Prerequisites: HSPT-121 or equivalent course and 3rd year standing.) Lec/Lab 6 (Fall, Spring).
   HSPT-375
   Customer Experience Management
The overall objectives of this course are twofold. This course first examines the development, management, and improvement of service delivery systems used by service organizations (i.e., hotels, restaurants, travel agencies, and health care) on the supply side through the lens of quality management. Secondly, the course examines customer requirements on the demand side by focusing upon how customer experience design shapes customers’ thoughts, actions, and decision processes. Students will learn techniques used for diagnosis, measurement, and continuous improvement of successful customer experience. There are three major sections in this course. Section 1 focuses on understanding the paradigm of customer experience, identifying the drivers of customer satisfaction, formulating strategies to optimize the customer experience, and managing service operations through the development of a service blueprint. Section 2 focuses on the role of exponential technologies, such as artificial intelligence, robotics, augmented reality, virtual reality, and data analytics, in creating exceptional customer experiences. Section 3 discusses the creation of exceptional luxury customer experiences, incorporating technology, and describing how brands go beyond traditional branding frameworks to create luxury experiences. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   INGS-270
   Cuisine, Culture and Power
Physically, culturally, and socially, humans live through food and drink. Spanning the globe, as nearly limitless omnivores, humans have developed myriad ways of collecting and cultivating food and taking advantage of local environments. We also put food to work for us socially by creating cuisine. Through cuisine, we forge and nourish relationships, commune with deities, and through luxury choices, demonstrate our "taste" and lay claim to elite status. Through the cultural practices of production and consumption of food and drink, we wield power. Food and drink consumption patterns have sustained slavery, poverty, malnutrition, and illegal immigration, and have laid waste to the environment. In this class, we explore physical, cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of food and become more aware of how the private, intimate act of a bite connects us to the rest of humanity. Lecture 3 (Fall).
   NUTR-215
   Foundations of Nutritional Sciences
This is an introductory course in contemporary nutrition issues. This course covers the study of specific nutrients and their functions, the development of dietary standards and guides and how these standards are applied throughout the lifecycle. Students learn to analyze their own diets and develop strategies to make any necessary dietary changes for a lifetime of good health. Current health and nutrition problems and nutrition misinformation will be discussed. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).