Hospitality and Service Management Associate in science degree

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Overview

The associate in science degree in hospitality and service management is an Associate+Bachelor’s degree program designed to prepare deaf and hard-of-hearing students to enter and successfully complete a baccalaureate degree in the hospitality and tourism management program. This program is only available to students seeking admission to the National Technical Institute for the Deaf.

Upon completion of the AS program with a minimum GPA of 2.5, students will enroll in Saunders College of Business, where they will pursue a bachelor’s degree in hospitality and tourism management. AS students may choose one of two concentrations: hotel and resort management or food and beverage management. Admission to this major is available for the fall semester only.

Curriculum

Hospitality & Service Management (hotel and resort management option), AS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
HSPT-131
Lodging Operations Management
Lodging operations examines the vision and mission, organizational structures, and the structure and functions of different divisions within the hotel. The course emphasizes the rooms divisions, and its relationship with other departments such as food and beverage, sales and marketing, human resources, and security divisions. Current issues of lodging organizations, application of customer service, and managerial skills are discussed.
3
HSPT-181
Principles of Food, Hotel, and Tourism Operations
This course introduces the student to the terms and concepts associated with the food, hotel, and tourism industries. The following distinctive operations will be explored: resorts, restaurants, catering, institutional food service, transportation, attractions, and events. The fundamental service philosophy behind the service sector will be introduced.
3
HSPT-334
International Resort Management
The course gives the student an understanding of how resorts and their recreational amenities are developed as tourist and business destinations. Focus is on the planning, development, operation, design, and special needs of golf, ski, marina, tennis, and spa operations. As part of this study, students select a specific type of property and analyze the methods used to develop, manage, and innovate the property's service offering.
3
HSPT-499
HSPT Co-op
Career-related work experience. Employment within the food, hospitality or tourism service management industries is monitored by the International Hospitality and Service Management Program and the Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services. One co-operative work experience may be replaced by a study abroad semester. Coop work is designed for the student to experience progressive training on the job as related to the academic option. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first-year studies. Graduation requirement: 3 coops. Department permission is required.
0
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
 
LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6†
3
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
LAS Elective: Mathematics‡
3
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
Second Year
ECON-101
Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes.
3
FOOD-223
Food and Beverage Management
3
FOOD-226
Food and Beverage Operations
4
HSPT-281
Service Management in a Global Economy
There are almost no businesses today that do not require some sort of service delivery package for the consumer. This course focuses on how a business identifies, qualifies, and measures a service as the main product of its operations. While a tangible product may also be involved, this class focuses on the service component. As companies globalize the need to provide service at different levels is compounded by the need to consider alternate distribution systems. This course follows service from it conceptual start, through its packaging, delivery, and quality control systems. We also consider the implications of the experience economy.
3
HSPT-284
HTM Marketing, Sales and PR
This course introduces students to hospitality marketing principles and sales techniques. Students will learn how to do effective hospitality-tourism industry market research, sales, and marketing plans. This course will provide students with an understanding of sales management and public relations practices used by hospitality professionals. Current trends in global marketplace distribution and effective hospitality and tourism industry promotional strategies will also be examined. Emphasis is placed on hospitality-tourism industry target marketing, marketing mix, analysis, product and image development, use of current media, sales planning, advertising, public relations, and collateral materials.
3
MATH-101
College Algebra
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations.
3
NACC-205
Financial Accounting
Introduction to accounting principles for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both service and merchandising (retail/wholesale) businesses are introduced. Areas covered include: analyzing and recording of business transactions using the double-entry accounting system; adjusting and closing entries and financial statement preparation. Generally accepted accounting principles, accounting ethics and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements.
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
61

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Any science course numbered NSCI-250 or higher

‡ Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-250 or higher

§ Choose a course from one of the following HSPT or FOOD program options: International Food Marketing and Distribution, International Hotel and Resort Management, and Entertainment and Event Management. See chart below.

 

Hospitality & Service Management (food and beverage management option), AS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
FOOD-121
Principles of Food Production
3
FOOD-123
Sanitation and Safety
1
FOOD-223
Food and Beverage Management
3
HSPT-181
Principles of Food, Hotel, and Tourism Operations
This course introduces the student to the terms and concepts associated with the food, hotel, and tourism industries. The following distinctive operations will be explored: resorts, restaurants, catering, institutional food service, transportation, attractions, and events. The fundamental service philosophy behind the service sector will be introduced.
3
HSPT-499
HSPT Co-op
Career-related work experience. Employment within the food, hospitality or tourism service management industries is monitored by the International Hospitality and Service Management Program and the Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services. One co-operative work experience may be replaced by a study abroad semester. Coop work is designed for the student to experience progressive training on the job as related to the academic option. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first-year studies. Graduation requirement: 3 coops. Department permission is required.
0
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
 
LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6†
3
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
LAS Elective: Mathematics‡
3
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
Second Year
ECON-101
Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes.
3
FOOD-224
Serving Alcohol Safely
1
FOOD-226
Food and Beverage Operations
4
HSPT-281
Service Management in a Global Economy
There are almost no businesses today that do not require some sort of service delivery package for the consumer. This course focuses on how a business identifies, qualifies, and measures a service as the main product of its operations. While a tangible product may also be involved, this class focuses on the service component. As companies globalize the need to provide service at different levels is compounded by the need to consider alternate distribution systems. This course follows service from it conceptual start, through its packaging, delivery, and quality control systems. We also consider the implications of the experience economy.
3
HSPT-284
HTM Marketing, Sales and PR
This course introduces students to hospitality marketing principles and sales techniques. Students will learn how to do effective hospitality-tourism industry market research, sales, and marketing plans. This course will provide students with an understanding of sales management and public relations practices used by hospitality professionals. Current trends in global marketplace distribution and effective hospitality and tourism industry promotional strategies will also be examined. Emphasis is placed on hospitality-tourism industry target marketing, marketing mix, analysis, product and image development, use of current media, sales planning, advertising, public relations, and collateral materials.
3
MATH-101
College Algebra
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations.
3
NACC-205
Financial Accounting
Introduction to accounting principles for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both service and merchandising (retail/wholesale) businesses are introduced. Areas covered include: analyzing and recording of business transactions using the double-entry accounting system; adjusting and closing entries and financial statement preparation. Generally accepted accounting principles, accounting ethics and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements.
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
60

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Any science course numbered NSCI-250 or higher

‡ Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-250 or higher

§ Choose a course from one of the following HSPT or FOOD program options: International Food Marketing and Distribution, International Hotel and Resort Management, and Entertainment and Event Management. See chart below.

Electives

Entertainment and Event Management
HSPT-234
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution
Everything in our lives today is a negotiation, from resolving conflicts with family members, dorm mates, and fellow students to employees, employers, and organizations. This is complicated by the fact that we live in a global environment facing intercultural issues daily. This course will identify the students' preferred styles of negotiation, how to identify the strategies and styles of others, and most importantly how to innovatively work with the other person in a conflict to establish a resolution to the problem. The course deals with competitive negotiations and collaborative negotiations, and how to engage successfully in each type.
HSPT-244
Meeting and Event Management
As companies and associations continue to grow they find their members are an increasingly diverse group from many geographic areas. While texting and email are ways to keep informed, the need to meet and discuss, in real time, what needs to be done has actually increased. Meetings today help us celebrate meaningful events, change the way people behave, motivate employees to perform better, and solve problems by bringing together ideas from many different cultures. The meeting and event planner of today must know how to plan, execute, and evaluate any event to show value to the stakeholders. This course shows the student how to go about doing this, from writing a purpose and goals for the meeting to financial break downs and gathering feedback, all while staging the event of a lifetime, over and over again.
HSPT-246
Casino Management
This course is designed to give students an introduction to the casino environment. Students will have a strong working knowledge of casino operations and the interrelationship of the casino with other major departments (lodging, food, beverage, entertainment, etc.). Topics include casino marketing strategies, gaming regulations, economic impact issues, history of gaming in America, design and layout of casinos, surveillance, back-office procedures, and gaming regulations. This course will teach casino games.
HSPT-248
Project Management for Events
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the principles and concepts required for the management and execution of a successful event. Essential topics will include event planning, coordination, sponsorship, budgeting, programming, marketing, communications, vendor management, volunteer management, risk management, event research, and event evaluation. Through industry visits and guest lectures from practitioners and industry professionals, students gain a greater understanding of the aspects associated with project management for upscale events.
HSPT-336
Risk Management and HTM Law
The course examines the principles, tools, techniques, and methods employed in order to be effective in reducing the risk of liability in the hospitality setting. Students learn how to recognize, evaluate and control, and treat some of the risks associated with operating hospitality businesses. Students study hospitality based negligence cases, court decisions, and resulting judgments. Safety and disaster management issues will be addressed.
HSPT-345
Food & Beverage Operations
Students will collaborate with the instructor in planning and managing a real restaurant, Henry’s. Management skills emphasized will include menu development, costing, forecasting, marketing, food production, customer service, and plate presentation. Students will demonstrate knowledge and management skills in menu planning, costing, forecasting, sourcing, storage, staffing, training, customer service, food production techniques, timing, and food presentation while maintaining quality and contemporary appeal.
International Food Marketing and Distribution
FOOD-151
International Food Distribution
FOOD-454
Food Processing, Quality, and Integrity
PACK-301
Packaging Materials
This first course in the packaging science minor will provide students with the opportunity to learn the basic properties and applications for the common packaging materials. Students will be instructed in fundamental evaluation procedures and in the determination of material specifications.
International Hotel and Resort Management
HSPT-232
Hospitality Real Estate and Facilities Management
Students will learn the criteria that owners and developers follow in developing hotel concepts and locating them in key markets where they will succeed. Students will also learn the steps in site selection, working with the trades in the construction phase, and turning the operation over to management. At the operation phase an engineering and maintenance department will be created to keep the property running efficiently and effectively for guest and employee safety and for cost efficiency. Special topics covering replacement and renovation will be addressed. The management incentives for creativity and innovation in technology and best practices will be a concurrent theme
HSPT-234
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution
Everything in our lives today is a negotiation, from resolving conflicts with family members, dorm mates, and fellow students to employees, employers, and organizations. This is complicated by the fact that we live in a global environment facing intercultural issues daily. This course will identify the students' preferred styles of negotiation, how to identify the strategies and styles of others, and most importantly how to innovatively work with the other person in a conflict to establish a resolution to the problem. The course deals with competitive negotiations and collaborative negotiations, and how to engage successfully in each type.
HSPT-235
International Destinations
This course introduces the student to the most famous travel destinations outside the United States. Specific emphasis is placed on understanding the cultural and political differences present at these locations and what makes them unique. Students explore the role governments and the media play in generating destination appeal. How international destinations are growing and declining as it may relate to the industries of hospitality and tourism are explored, with emphasis on working abroad.
HSPT-336
Risk Management and HTM Law
The course examines the principles, tools, techniques, and methods employed in order to be effective in reducing the risk of liability in the hospitality setting. Students learn how to recognize, evaluate and control, and treat some of the risks associated with operating hospitality businesses. Students study hospitality based negligence cases, court decisions, and resulting judgments. Safety and disaster management issues will be addressed.

Admission Requirements

To enroll in Saunders College of Business, students must present a grade point average of 2.5 or higher upon graduation with the associate in science degree.

Specific requirements

ACT: Composite test score of 18 and above.

English: Placement into a First Year Writing course, such as FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150). Students who qualify for Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) will be considered for admission if they are at NMTH-250 or higher in mathematics.

Mathematics: Placement into mathematics NMTH-210 or higher. Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Placement into science NSCI-250 or higher. Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least two years of high school science.

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