Hospitality and Service Management Associate in Science Degree

Overview

The associate in science degree in hospitality and service management is an Associate+Bachelor’s degree program designed to prepare deaf and hard-of-hearing students to enter and successfully complete a baccalaureate degree in the hospitality and tourism management program. This program is available for qualified deaf and hard of hearing students. 

Upon completion of the AS program in RIT's National Technical Institute for the Deaf, with a minimum GPA of 2.5, students will enroll in Saunders College of Business, where they will pursue a bachelor’s degree in hospitality and tourism management. AS students may choose one of two concentrations: hotel and resort management or food and beverage management. Admission to this major is available for the fall semester only.

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Curriculum for Hospitality and Service Management AS

Hospitality & Service Management (hotel and resort management option), AS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
HSPT-131
Lodging Operations Management
Lodging operations examines the vision and mission, organizational structures, and the structure and functions of different divisions within the hotel. The course emphasizes the rooms divisions, and its relationship with other departments such as food and beverage, sales and marketing, human resources, and security divisions. Current issues of lodging organizations, application of customer service, and managerial skills are discussed. (This course is restricted to HSPS-BS and HSPS-AAS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
HSPT-181
Principles of Food, Hotel, and Tourism Operations
This course introduces the student to the terms and concepts associated with the food, hotel, and tourism industries. The following distinctive operations will be explored: resorts, restaurants, catering, institutional food service, transportation, attractions, and events. The fundamental service philosophy behind the service sector will be introduced. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
HSPT-334
International Resort Management
The course gives the student an understanding of how resorts and their recreational amenities are developed as tourist and business destinations. Focus is on the planning, development, operation, design, and special needs of golf, ski, marina, tennis, and spa operations. As part of this study, students select a specific type of property and analyze the methods used to develop, manage, and innovate the property's service offering. (This course is restricted to HSPS-BS and HSPS-AAS Major students.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
HSPT-499
HSPT Co-op
Career-related work experience. Employment within the food, hospitality or tourism service management industries is monitored by the International Hospitality and Service Management Program and the Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services. One co-operative work experience may be replaced by a study abroad semester. Coop work is designed for the student to experience progressive training on the job as related to the academic option. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first-year studies. Graduation requirement: 3 coops. Department permission is required. (Academic Level 1 thru 4, Degree Seeking students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides incoming deaf and hard-of-hearing students admitted to NTID undergraduate programs with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students will have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills, and participate in experiential learning opportunities while establishing meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. (NTID Supported Students.) Lec/Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6†
3
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
LAS Elective: Mathematics‡
3
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
Second Year
ECON-101
Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
FOOD-223
Food and Beverage Management
3
FOOD-226
Food and Beverage Operations
4
HSPT-281
Service Management in a Global Economy
3
HSPT-284
HTM Marketing, Sales and PR
This course introduces students to hospitality marketing principles and sales techniques. Students will learn how to do effective hospitality-tourism industry market research, sales, and marketing plans. This course will provide students with an understanding of sales management and public relations practices used by hospitality professionals. Current trends in global marketplace distribution and effective hospitality and tourism industry promotional strategies will also be examined. Emphasis is placed on hospitality-tourism industry target marketing, marketing mix, analysis, product and image development, use of current media, sales planning, advertising, public relations, and collateral materials. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MATH-101
College Algebra
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations. (Prerequisites: Students may not take and receive credit for MATH-101 and MATH-111. See the Math department with any questions.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
NACC-205
Financial Accounting
Introduction to accounting principles for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both service and merchandising (retail/wholesale) businesses are introduced. Areas covered include: analyzing and recording of business transactions using the double-entry accounting system; adjusting and closing entries and financial statement preparation. Generally accepted accounting principles, accounting ethics and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
61

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Any science course numbered NSCI-250 or higher

‡ Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-250 or higher

§ Choose a course from one of the following HSPT or FOOD program options: International Food Marketing and Distribution, International Hotel and Resort Management, and Entertainment and Event Management. See chart below.

 

Hospitality & Service Management (food and beverage management option), AS degree, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
FOOD-121
Principles of Food Production
3
FOOD-123
Sanitation and Safety
1
FOOD-223
Food and Beverage Management
3
HSPT-181
Principles of Food, Hotel, and Tourism Operations
This course introduces the student to the terms and concepts associated with the food, hotel, and tourism industries. The following distinctive operations will be explored: resorts, restaurants, catering, institutional food service, transportation, attractions, and events. The fundamental service philosophy behind the service sector will be introduced. Lecture 3 (Fall).
3
HSPT-499
HSPT Co-op
Career-related work experience. Employment within the food, hospitality or tourism service management industries is monitored by the International Hospitality and Service Management Program and the Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services. One co-operative work experience may be replaced by a study abroad semester. Coop work is designed for the student to experience progressive training on the job as related to the academic option. Freshmen begin co-op the summer following their first-year studies. Graduation requirement: 3 coops. Department permission is required. (Academic Level 1 thru 4, Degree Seeking students.) CO OP (Fall, Spring, Summer).
0
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides incoming deaf and hard-of-hearing students admitted to NTID undergraduate programs with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students will have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills, and participate in experiential learning opportunities while establishing meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. (NTID Supported Students.) Lec/Lab 2 (Fall, Spring).
0
 
LAS Elective
3
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 2 (artistic)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6†
3
 
First Year Writing (WI)
3
 
LAS Elective: Mathematics‡
3
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
Second Year
ECON-101
Principles of Microeconomics
Microeconomics studies the workings of individual markets. That is, it examines the interaction of the demanders of goods and services with the suppliers of those goods and services. It explores how the behavior of consumers (demanders), the behavior of producers (suppliers), and the level of market competition influence market outcomes. Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
FOOD-224
Serving Alcohol Safely
1
FOOD-226
Food and Beverage Operations
4
HSPT-281
Service Management in a Global Economy
3
HSPT-284
HTM Marketing, Sales and PR
This course introduces students to hospitality marketing principles and sales techniques. Students will learn how to do effective hospitality-tourism industry market research, sales, and marketing plans. This course will provide students with an understanding of sales management and public relations practices used by hospitality professionals. Current trends in global marketplace distribution and effective hospitality and tourism industry promotional strategies will also be examined. Emphasis is placed on hospitality-tourism industry target marketing, marketing mix, analysis, product and image development, use of current media, sales planning, advertising, public relations, and collateral materials. (This class is restricted to undergraduate students with at least 2nd year standing.) Lecture 3 (Spring).
3
MATH-101
College Algebra
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations. (Prerequisites: Students may not take and receive credit for MATH-101 and MATH-111. See the Math department with any questions.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
NACC-205
Financial Accounting
Introduction to accounting principles for both accounting and non-accounting students. Both service and merchandising (retail/wholesale) businesses are introduced. Areas covered include: analyzing and recording of business transactions using the double-entry accounting system; adjusting and closing entries and financial statement preparation. Generally accepted accounting principles, accounting ethics and analytical tools help students become informed users of financial statements. (NTID Supported Students.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
3
 
Wellness Education*
0
 
HSPT or FOOD Elective§
3
 
LAS Perspective 3 (global)
3
 
LAS Perspective 4 (social)
3
Total Semester Credit Hours
60

Please see the NTID General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) for more information.

* Please see Wellness Education Requirement for more information. Students completing associate degrees are required to complete one Wellness course.

† Any science course numbered NSCI-250 or higher

‡ Any mathematics course numbered NMTH-250 or higher

§ Choose a course from one of the following HSPT or FOOD program options: International Food Marketing and Distribution, International Hotel and Resort Management, and Entertainment and Event Management. See chart below.

Electives

Entertainment and Event Management
HSPT-234
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution
HSPT-244
Meeting and Event Management
HSPT-246
Casino Management
HSPT-248
Project Management for Events
HSPT-336
Risk Management and HTM Law
The course examines the principles, tools, techniques, and methods employed in order to be effective in reducing the risk of liability in the hospitality setting. Students learn how to recognize, evaluate and control, and treat some of the risks associated with operating hospitality businesses. Students study hospitality based negligence cases, court decisions, and resulting judgments. Safety and disaster management issues will be addressed. (A minimum of 3rd year standing is required to enroll.) Lecture 3 (Fall).
HSPT-345
Food & Beverage Operations
Students will collaborate with the instructor in planning and managing a real restaurant, Henry’s. Management skills emphasized will include menu development, costing, forecasting, marketing, food production, customer service, and plate presentation. Students will demonstrate knowledge and management skills in menu planning, costing, forecasting, sourcing, storage, staffing, training, customer service, food production techniques, timing, and food presentation while maintaining quality and contemporary appeal. (Prerequisites: HSPT-223 and HSPT-360 or equivalent courses.) Lab 12 (Fall).
International Food Marketing and Distribution
FOOD-151
International Food Distribution
FOOD-454
Food Processing, Quality, and Integrity
PACK-301
Packaging Materials
This first course in the packaging science minor will provide students with the opportunity to learn the basic properties and applications for the common packaging materials. Students will be instructed in fundamental evaluation procedures and in the determination of material specifications. (Students in PACK-BS and PACK-2M are unable to enroll in this class.) Lecture 3 (Fall, Spring).
International Hotel and Resort Management
HSPT-232
Hospitality Real Estate and Facilities Management
HSPT-234
Negotiation & Conflict Resolution
HSPT-235
International Destinations
HSPT-336
Risk Management and HTM Law
The course examines the principles, tools, techniques, and methods employed in order to be effective in reducing the risk of liability in the hospitality setting. Students learn how to recognize, evaluate and control, and treat some of the risks associated with operating hospitality businesses. Students study hospitality based negligence cases, court decisions, and resulting judgments. Safety and disaster management issues will be addressed. (A minimum of 3rd year standing is required to enroll.) Lecture 3 (Fall).

Admission Requirements

To enroll in Saunders College of Business, students must present a grade point average of 2.5 or higher upon graduation with the associate in science degree.

Specific requirements

ACT: Composite test score of 18 and above.

English: Placement into a First Year Writing course, such as FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150). Students who qualify for Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) will be considered for admission if they are at NMTH-250 or higher in mathematics.

Mathematics: Placement into mathematics NMTH-210 or higher. Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least three years of high school mathematics.

Science: Placement into science NSCI-250 or higher. Typically, students entering this major will have completed at least two years of high school science.

Learn about admissions, cost, and financial aid 

Latest News

  • December 1, 2020

    Rick Lagiewski, Ph.D. speaking at an event

    Mastering Customer Experience

    Graduates from Saunders College of Business hospitality and tourism management (HTM) master of science program are professional “guestologists,” mastering customer experience and the market behind it.

  • August 6, 2018

    Connor Draughn poses for a photo and smiles in front of a large world map.

    Study abroad a highlight for hospitality student

    Connor Draughn wanted to get out of his comfort zone and try something new, so the hospitality and tourism management major decided to spend a semester studying at RIT Croatia. Draughn is one example of how students are already benefiting from RIT’s $1 billion blended campaign.