Photographic Arts and Sciences Exploration

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Overview

Spend up to a year exploring RIT’s different photography majors as you decide which option best matches your career goals. 

For students interested in photography but unsure which major best meets their career aspirations, the undeclared photography option provides you with an overview of the two photography majors and their options—photographic and imaging arts (with options in advertising photography, fine art photography, photojournalism, or visual media) or photographic sciences (with options in biomedical photographic communications and imaging and photographic technology). Undeclared photography allows you to take up to four semesters to learn about each major while you complete general education and liberal arts courses.

Curriculum

Photography undeclared, typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
Choose one of the following: 8
  PHPS-101,102    Photography I, II (BS)  
  PHAR-101,102    Photo Arts I, II (BFA)  
PHPS-106
Photographic Technology I
This first course of a two-semester course will explore the basic technology required for producing photographs, with an emphasis on applications to real world photographic problems. Among the topics studied in the course will be lenses, image formation and evaluation, perspective, light sources, light-sensitive materials, exposure, digital systems and post-processing, tone reproduction, digital workflows, variability, quality control and photographic effects.
3
PHPS-107
Photographic Technology II
This is the second course in a two-semester course based in the study of the technology of photography, with emphasis on applications to real world photographic problems. Among the topics studied will include color vision, Munsell color system, CIELAB system, color theory, color management, digital color balance during post-processing, digital tone reproduction, and digital workflows.
3
ENGL-150
Writing Seminar
This First Year Writing Intensive course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical writing, rhetorical reading, and critical thinking by focusing on particular uses of narrative. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. Increasingly, scholars, artists, public figures and other professionals recognize the value of using stories across genres to inform analytical practice. Students will gain informed practice in using narrative in different disciplines, and become aware of storytelling as one among a number of rhetorical strategies for inquiry. Students will be expected to give presentations as well as write papers both in response to the reading material and in services of their own independent arguments.
3
ACSC-010
Year One
The Year One class serves as an interdisciplinary catalyst for first-year students to access campus resources, services and opportunities that promote self-knowledge, personal success, leadership development, social responsibility and life academic skills awareness and application. Year One is also designed to challenge and encourage first-year students to get to know one another, build relationships and help them become an integral part of the campus community.
0
 
LAS Perspective 1 (ethical)
3
 
LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
3
 
LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
3
 
LAS Perspective 7 (mathematical)
3
Choose one of the following:
3
  ARTH-135
   LAS Perspective 2 (artistic): History of Western Art: Ancient to Medieval
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from Prehistory through the Middle Ages. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
 
  
   LAS Perspective 5 (natural science inquiry)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7A (mathematical)
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  ARTH-136
   LAS Perspective 3 (global): History of Western Art: Renaissance to Modern
The subject of this course is the history of western art and architecture from the Renaissance through the early 20th century. We will examine the form, style, function, and meaning of important objects and monuments of the past, and consider these in their social, historical and cultural contexts. A chronological study will allow us to recognize when, where and by whom a given object was produced. Once these decisive factors are established, we may try to determine why the object was made, what it meant in its time, place and culture, and whose ideology it served. Since we are dealing with visual information, the primary goals of this class are to learn how to look, and how to describe and analyze what we see. At the end of the term, students will be prepared to pursue additional courses in the discipline, for they will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
 
 
   LAS Perspective 7B (mathematical)
 
 
   LAS Perspective 6 (scientific principles)
 
Choose one of the following:
3
  FDTN-111
   Drawing I (BFA)
This course is an introduction to the visualization of form, thought and expression through the drawing process. Concepts are introduced by lectures, discussions, demonstrations, research, and assigned projects. Designed to provide a broad introductory experience, students will experiment with a wide variety of media, tools, techniques and subjects to develop drawing expertise and problem solving skills related to design and composition. Course work will be assessed through critique, facilitating self-assessment, and the growth of both a visual and verbal vocabulary. The focus of the course is to provide awareness of the full range of ways in which drawing is used as a tool for both self-expression and communication.
 
  
   LAS Perspective 2 (artistic) (BS)
 
Total Semester Credit Hours
32

Please see General Education Curriculum-Liberal Arts and Sciences (LAS) in the Graduation Requirements section of this bulletin for more information.