Pre-Baccalaureate Science and Mathematics

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Overview

The pre-baccalaureate studies program is available to students who are accepted by NTID and are close to, but not fully ready for, direct entry into a baccalaureate-level program through one of the other colleges of RIT. It is a bridge program for qualified students, based on academic transcripts, scores on admissions tests, and other evidence that supports a reasonable expectation of success in baccalaureate course work. Qualified students who are undecided as to a program of study may choose the career exploration studies program.

Enrollment in the pre-baccalaureate studies program is appropriate for students who need to further develop mathematics, English, or discipline-related skills. The academic program is flexible and individualized and allows students to focus on needed skills while concurrently progressing toward their chosen field of study. Students may take courses taught by NTID faculty, as well as entry-level courses taught in other RIT colleges. While in the program, students receive academic advising as well as career counseling.

Students cannot receive a degree in pre-baccalaureate studies. Rather, they will apply for admission into a baccalaureate program as soon as they are academically ready and the college offering their chosen baccalaureate program reviews their application for admission. After completing an entire academic year in the program, a student must transfer to a degree-granting program in NTID or one of the other colleges of RIT.

Curriculum

Pre-Baccalaureate Studies (Environmental Management or Medical Sciences), typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
BIOL-101
General Biology I
This course serves as an introduction to cellular, molecular, and evolutionary biology. Topics will include: a study of the basic principles of modern cellular biology, including cell structure and function; the chemical basis and functions of life, including enzyme systems and gene expression; and the origin of life and evolutionary patterns of organism development on Earth.
3
BIOL-102
General Biology II
This course serves as an introduction to animal and plant anatomy and physiology, in addition to the fundamentals of ecology. Topics will include: animal development; animal body systems; plant development; unique plant systems; Earth's terrestrial and aquatic environments; population and community ecology; animal behavior; and conservation biology.
3
BIOL-103
General Biology Lab I
This course provides laboratory work to complement the lecture material of General Biology I. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of basic cellular and molecular biology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for microscopy, and improve ability to make, record and interpret observations.
1
BIOL-104  
General Biology Lab II
This course provides laboratory work to complement the material of General Biology II. The experiments are designed to illustrate concepts of animal and plant anatomy and physiology, develop laboratory skills and techniques for experimenting with live organisms, and improve ability to make, record, and interpret observations.
1
MATH-101
College Algebra
This course provides the background for an introductory level, non-trigonometry based calculus course. The topics include a review of the fundamentals of algebra: solutions of linear, fractional, and quadratic equations, functions and their graphs, polynomial, exponential, logarithmic and rational functions, and systems of linear equations.
3
MATH-161
Applied Calculus‡
This course is an introduction to the study of differential and integral calculus, including the study of functions and graphs, limits, continuity, the derivative, derivative formulas, applications of derivatives, the definite integral, the fundamental theorem of calculus, basic techniques of integral approximation, exponential and logarithmic functions, basic techniques of integration, an introduction to differential equations, and geometric series. Applications in business, management sciences, and life sciences will be included with an emphasis on manipulative skills.
4
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
  
Pre-baccalaureate courses*
3-6
 
LAS General Education†
9
Total Semester Credit Hours
27-30

* Pre-baccalaureate courses are an available option to strengthen students’ skills in critical thinking, learning strategies, and specific discipline areas.

† Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information. Depending on placement, the writing sequence may begin with Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) or FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150).

‡ Alternative mathematics courses may be required as prerequisites, depending on placement.

Pre-Baccalaureate Studies in Science (Chemistry Option), typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
CHMG-141
General & Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
3
CHMG-142
General & Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics.
3
CHMG-145
General & Analytical Chemistry Lab I
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions.
1
CHMG-146
General & Analytical Chemistry Lab II
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions.
1
MATH-181
Project-based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
4
MATH-182
Project-based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
4
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
 
LAS General Education*
9
  
Pre-baccalaureate courses†
3-6
Total Semester Credit Hours
28-31

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information. Depending on placement, the writing sequence may begin with Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) or FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150).

† Pre-baccalaureate courses are available to strengthen students’ skills in critical thinking, learning strategies, and specific discipline areas.

Pre-Baccalaureate Studies in Science (Math or Physics Option), typical course sequence

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
NCAR-010
Freshman Seminar
The course provides entering NTID students with opportunities to develop/enhance academic skills, personal awareness, and community involvement in order to maximize their college experience. Students have opportunities to explore and navigate the college environment, develop/reinforce academic skills and participate in service learning opportunities. Students are encouraged to establish meaningful connections with faculty, staff and peers. The course promotes the development of plans for ongoing growth and involvement in class and in the RIT/NTID and/or broader community. Students must pass this course to earn an associates degree.
0
Choose one of the following course sequences:§
8
  CHMG-141
   General & Analytical Chemistry I
This is a general chemistry course for students in the life and physical sciences. College chemistry is presented as a science based on empirical evidence that is placed into the context of conceptual, visual, and mathematical models. Students will learn the concepts, symbolism, and fundamental tools of chemistry necessary to carry on a discourse in the language of chemistry. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between atomic structure, chemical bonds, and the transformation of these bonds through chemical reactions. The fundamentals of organic chemistry are introduced throughout the course to emphasize the connection between chemistry and the other sciences.
 
  CHMG-142
   General & Analytical Chemistry II
The course covers the thermodynamics and kinetics of chemical reactions. The relationship between energy and entropy change as the driving force of chemical processes is emphasized through the study of aqueous solutions. Specifically, the course takes a quantitative look at: 1) solubility equilibrium, 2) acid-base equilibrium, 3) oxidation-reduction reactions and 4) chemical kinetics.
 
  CHMG-145
   General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-141 lecture material. The course emphasizes laboratory techniques and data analysis skills. Topics include: gravimetric, volumetric, thermal, titration and spectrophotometric analyses, and the use of these techniques to analyze chemical reactions.
 
  CHMG-146
   General & Analytical Chemistry I Lab
The course combines hands-on laboratory exercises with workshop-style problem sessions to complement the CHMG-142 lecture material. The course emphasizes the use of experiments as a tool for chemical analysis and the reporting of results in formal lab reports. Topics include the quantitative analysis of a multicomponent mixture using complexation and double endpoint titration, pH measurement, buffers and pH indicators, the kinetic study of a redox reaction, and the electrochemical analysis of oxidation reduction reactions.
 
  or
 
 
   PHYS-211
    University Physics I
This is a course in calculus-based physics for science and engineering majors. Topics include kinematics, planar motion, Newton's Laws, gravitation, work and energy, momentum and impulse, conservation laws, systems of particles, rotational motion, static equilibrium, mechanical oscillations and waves, and data presentation/analysis. The course is taught in a workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
 
   PHYS-212
    University Physics II
This course is a continuation of PHYS-211, University Physics I. Topics include electrostatics, Gauss' law, electric field and potential, capacitance, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic field, Ampere's law, inductance, and geometrical and physical optics. The course is taught in a lecture/workshop format that integrates the material traditionally found in separate lecture and laboratory courses.
 
Choose one of the following course sequences:‡
6-8
  MATH-171
   Calculus A
This is the first course in a three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). This course includes a study of functions, continuity, and differentiability. The study of functions includes the exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Limits of functions are used to study continuity and differentiability. The study of the derivative includes the definition, basic rules, and implicit differentiation. Applications of the derivative include optimization and related-rates problems.
 
  MATH-172
   Calculus B
This is the second course in three-course sequence (COS-MATH-171, -172, -173). The course includes Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, techniques of integration, and applications of the definite integral. The techniques of integration include substitution and integration by parts. The applications of the definite integral include areas between curves, and the calculation of volume.
 
  or
 
 
  MATH-181
   Project-Based Calculus I
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
 
  MATH-182
   Project-Based Calculus II
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
 
 
LAS General Education*
9
 
Pre-baccalaureate courses†
3-6
Total Semester Credit Hours
26-31

* Please see Liberal Arts General Education Requirements for more information. Depending on placement, the writing sequence may begin with Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100) or FYW: Writing Seminar (UWRT-150).

† Pre-baccalaureate courses are an option to strengthen students’ skills in critical thinking, learning strategies, and specific discipline areas.

‡ Alternate mathematics courses may be required as prerequisites, depending on placement.

§ If pursuing the physics option, students must choose the physics sequence.

Admission Requirements

Specific Requirements

Students entering pre-baccalaureate studies in science or mathematics will typically be required to have:

ACT: Minimum composite score of 21 with subscores of at least 19.
English: Placement into Critical Reading and Writing (UWRT-100)
Mathematics: Placement in NTID Advanced Mathematics (NMTH-275) course or higher

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