Student Privacy

RIT complies with the Family Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, which governs access and release of information from student educational records. That statute, in part:

  • Permits students to inspect their educational records
  • Provides the opportunity to challenge the accuracy of such records
  • Limits disclosure of non-directory information such as grades and class schedules to persons outside the institute without the student's written permission

Prior consent is not required for disclosure of educational records to officials of RIT who have been determined to have a legitimate educational interest.
 
All students, regardless of age, have a right under RIT policy D15 of access to and confidentiality of their educational records. The parents (or guardian) of a dependent student have the same rights of access to the records of the student, regardless of the student's age. The parents (or guardian) of a nondependent student are not permitted access without the student's written consent. Except in unusual situations, RIT will not initiate the release of any information or records to parents and expects students to keep their parents informed to whatever degree the individual students and parents deem appropriate. Refer to the complete RIT Educational Records Policy D15.

All parental rights to access education records, without consent, transfer to the student at age 18. Therefore, parents will only be given rights to access educational records if a) the student has given written consent, b) in compliance with a subpoena, c) by submission of evidence that the parents declare the student as a dependent (as defined by the Internal Revenue Service). Students may obtain the form “FERPA Consent to Release Student Information” at http://finweb.rit.edu/legalaffairs/policiesprocedures.html to allow parents the right to access educational records.

Requests to limit disclosure of directory information must be filed in writing annually in the Registrar's Office. Students have the right to file complaints with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures to comply with the act.