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Careers and Employment Trends 2015

This on-line resource represents RIT’s continued commitment to providing concise and relevant career guidance and outcome information to students, families, members of the guidance and counseling communities, and any interested individuals who wish to explore the relationship between career opportunities and college-level academic preparation. Assembled and organized by RIT’s Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education, the site includes both Job Outlook 2022 and a summary of career outcomes for each’s year graduating class from RIT.

Job Outlook to 2022 Undergraduate career outcomes for the RIT class of 2015 Graduate career outcomes for the RIT class of 2015

Also available: class of 2016 career outcomes and class of 2014 career outcomes.

Job Outlook to 2022

Information and helpful links are provided here for 70 occupational areas based on national data and analysis provided by the U.S Department of Labor and relevant professional associations. This information is updated on a regular basis as new information becomes available.

Other helpful career websites

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Accountants and Auditors 1,275,400 Up 13% at an average rate Overall job opportunities should be favorable, although jobseekers who have earned professional recognition, especially as Certified Public Accountants (CPAs), should have the best prospects. Job applicants who have a master’s degree in accounting or a master’s degree in business with a concentration in accounting also may have an advantage. Competition should be strong for jobs with the most prestigious accounting and business firms.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Financial Managers 532,100 Up 9% at an average rate Growth is expected to be steady and will increase in line with the growth of the economy as a whole. Candidates with expertise in accounting and finance, particularly those with a master’s degree, should enjoy the best job prospects. Strong computer skills and knowledge of international finance are important; so are excellent communication skills, because financial management jobs involve working on strategic planning teams.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Manufacturing and Wholesale Sales Representatives 1,863,000 Up 9% at an average rate Employment growth is expected to be strongest for sales representatives working at independent sales agencies. Companies are increasingly giving their sales activities to independent companies as a way to cut costs and boost revenue. Job opportunities should be best for those with previous sales experience. Though the large size of the occupation creates many job openings, the relatively high pay will also likely attract a large number of applicants.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Advertising, Marketing, Promotions, Public Relations, and Sales Managers 216,000 Up 12% at an average rate Intense domestic and global competition in products and services offered to consumers is expected to spur faster-than-average growth in employment. Employment is projected to grow much faster than average in scientific, professional, and related services such as computer systems design and related services and advertising and related services, as businesses increasingly hire contractors for these services instead of additional full-time staff.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
HR, Training, and Labor Relations Managers and Specialists 495,500 Up 7% at a slower-than-average rate College graduates who have majored in a wide range of fields fill entry-level jobs. For many specialized jobs, previous experience is an asset; for more advanced positions, including those of managers, arbitrators, and mediators, it is essential. Keen competition for jobs is expected due to the abundant supply of qualified college graduates and experienced workers.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Computer Programmers 343,700 Up 8% at an average rate Many computer programmers work in computer system design and related services, an industry that is expected to grow as a result of an increasing demand for new computer software. In addition, new applications will have to be developed for mobile technology and the health care industry. Job prospects will be best for programmers who have a bachelor’s degree or higher and knowledge of a variety of programming languages. Keeping up to date with the newest programming tools will also improve job prospects.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Computer Systems Analysts 520,600 Up 25% at a much faster-than-average rate Additional job growth is expected for computer systems analysts in health care fields. A large increase is also anticipated in electronic medical records, e-prescribing, and other forms of health care IT, and analysts will be needed to design computer systems to accommodate the increase. These analysts, who will be hired by organizations to design computer systems in a variety of industries, will move on to another assignment when they are finished.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Computer Support Specialists 722,400 Up 17% at a faster-than-average rate As technology becomes more complex and widespread, support specialists will be needed in greater numbers to resolve the technical problems that arise. There are many paths of entry to a job as a computer support specialist. There are usually clear advancement possibilities for computer support specialists, creating new job openings. Applicants with a bachelor’s degree and a strong technical background should have the best job opportunities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Video Game Developers and Designers estimate not available Growth projected at an average rate Video game developers and designers create games that can be played on console systems, computers, and mobile devices. The growing complexity of visual effects, animations, and computer hardware systems are expected to contribute positively to the growth of the profession. Developer positions at large studios are expected to be competitive. Openings at small studios are expected to increase, especially in the area of social media and mobile device game development. Candidates with computer programming skills in multiple languages and a strong portfolio will enjoy the most opportunities.
More information on computer programmers and multimedia artists and animators is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
College and University Faculty 1,267,700 Up 19% at a faster-than-average rate Opportunities for college and university teaching jobs are expected to improve, but many new openings will be for part-time or non-tenure-track positions. Prospects for teaching jobs will continue to be better in academic fields that offer attractive alternative nonacademic job opportunities—health specialties, business and computer science, for example, which attract fewer applicants for academic positions. Educational qualifications for postsecondary teacher jobs range from expertise in a particular field to a Ph.D., depending on the subject being taught and the type of educational institution.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Kindergarten, Elementary, Middle and Secondary School Teachers 1,519,700; 614,400; 955,800 Up 6-12% at an average rate Public school teachers must have at least a bachelor’s degree, complete an approved teacher education program, and be licensed. Licensure is not required in private schools. A number of states require that teachers obtain a master’s degree in education within a specified period after they begin teaching. Aspiring secondary teachers most often major in the subject they plan to teach while taking a program of study in teacher preparation.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Librarians 148,400 Up 7% at a slower-than-average rate A master’s degree in library science usually is required; special librarians often need an additional graduate or professional degree. A large number of retirements in the next decade is expected to result in many job openings for librarians to replace those who leave. Librarians increasingly use information technology to perform research, classify materials, and help students and library patrons seek information. Jobs for librarians outside traditional settings will grow the fastest over the decade. Nontraditional librarian jobs include working as information brokers and working for private corporations, nonprofit organizations, and consulting firms.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

- Shaded areas indicate career fields for which preparation is not offered by RIT.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Aerospace Engineers 83,000 Up 7% at a slower-than-average rate New technologies and new designs for commercial and military aircraft and spacecraft produced during the next decade should spur demand for aerospace engineers. Employment opportunities also should be favorable for those trained in computational fluid dynamics software, which has enabled companies to test designs in a digital environment, thereby lowering testing costs. Although the number of degrees granted in aerospace engineering has begun to increase after many years of decline, new graduates continue to be needed to replace aerospace engineers who retire or leave the occupation for other reasons.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Architects 107,400 Up 17% at a faster-than-average rate With a growing number of students graduating with architectural degrees, strong competition for internships and jobs in the field is expected. Those with up-to-date technical skills and training in sustainable design could have an advantage. Employment of architects is strongly tied to the activity of the construction industry. Therefore, these workers may experience periods of unemployment when there is a slowdown in requests for new projects or when the overall level of construction falls. Licensing requirements include a professional degree in architecture, a period of practical training, and passing all divisions of the Architect Registration Examination.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Biomedical Engineers 19,400 Up 27% at a much faster-than-average rate The aging of the population and the focus on health issues will drive the demand for better medical devices and equipment designed by biomedical engineers. An increased concern for cost-effectiveness will also boost demand in pharmaceutical manufacturing and related industries. Biomedical engineers with only a bachelor’s degree may face competition for jobs. Unlike many other engineering specialties, a graduate degree is recommended or required for many entry-level jobs.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Chemical Engineers 33,300 Up 4% at a slower-than-average rate Overall employment in the chemical manufacturing industry is expected to continue to decline, although chemical companies will continue to employ chemical engineers to research and develop new chemicals and more efficient processes to increase output of existing chemicals. However, there will be employment growth for chemical engineers in service-providing industries, such as professional, scientific, and technical services, particularly for research in energy and the developing fields of biotechnology and nanotechnology.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Civil Engineers 272,900 Up 20% at a faster-than-average rate Spurred by general population growth and an increased emphasis on infrastructure and security, more civil engineers will be needed to design and construct safe and higher capacity transportation, water supply, and pollution control systems, and large buildings and building complexes. They also will be needed to repair or replace existing roads, bridges, and other public structures.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Computer Engineers (applications and systems) 1,018,000 Up 22% at a much faster-than-average rate The main reason for the rapid growth is a large increase in the demand for computer software. Mobile technology requires new applications. The health care industry is greatly increasing its use of computer systems and applications. Also, concerns over threats to computer security could result in more investment in security software to protect computer networks and electronic infrastructure.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Electrical Engineers 306,100 Up 4% at a slower-than-average rate Job growth for electrical and electronics engineers will largely occur in engineering services firms, because more companies are expected to cut costs by contracting engineering services rather than directly employing engineers. These engineers will also experience job growth in computer systems design, as these industries continue to implement more powerful portable computing devices. The rapid pace of technological innovation and development will likely drive demand for electrical and electronics engineers in research and development, an area in which engineering expertise will be needed to develop distribution systems related to new technologies.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Industrial Engineers 223,300 Up 5% at a slower-than-average rate As firms look for new ways to reduce costs and raise productivity, they increasingly will turn to industrial engineers to develop more efficient processes and reduce costs, delays, and waste. This focus should lead to job growth for these engineers, even in some manufacturing industries with declining employment overall. Because their work is similar to that done in management occupations, many industrial engineers leave the occupation to become managers. Numerous openings will be created by the need to replace industrial engineers who transfer to other occupations or leave the labor force.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Mechanical Engineers 258,100 Up 5% at a slower-than-average rate Employment of mechanical engineers in manufacturing should increase more rapidly as the demand for improved machinery and machine tools grows and as industrial machinery and processes become increasingly complex. Also, emerging technologies in biotechnology, materials science, and nanotechnology will create new job opportunities for mechanical engineers. Additional opportunities for mechanical engineers will arise because a degree in mechanical engineering often can be applied in other engineering specialties.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Microelectronic Engineers estimate not available Growth projected at an average rate Microelectronic engineers working in the semiconductor industry use diverse knowledge in engineering, solid-state electronics, physics, chemistry, materials science, optics, and applied math and statistics to design and fabricate smaller and more powerful integrated circuits (microchips), the vital component in almost every advanced electronic product manufactured today.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Engineering Technologists and Technicians 497,300 Up 5% at a slower-than-average rate In general, opportunities will be best for individuals with an associate degree or other postsecondary training in engineering technology. Mastering new technology and software will likely become more important for workers in this occupation. Those who gain skills to help deploy the latest technological developments should have the best job prospects. Many engineering technicians will find work in emerging fields such as automation, remanufacturing, 3-D printing, and alternative energies.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Packaging Scientists estimate not available Growth projected at a faster-than-average rate Nearly everything comes in a “package.” Whether containing food and perishable goods, personal products, or sophisticated technical components, materials need to be packaged for sales, storage, or transport. Employment is available in areas such as package development, sales, purchasing, structural design, production, research, and marketing, and requires creativity as well as a strong background in business, engineering, and science.

- Shaded areas indicate career fields for which preparation is not offered by RIT.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Chiropractors 44,400 Up 15% at a faster-than-average rate Chiropractors must be licensed, requiring two to four years of undergraduate education, completion of a four-year chiropractic college course, and passing scores on national and state examinations. Employment is expected to increase faster than average as a result of research and changing attitudes about alternative health care practices. Job prospects should be good; establishing a new practice will be easiest in areas with a low concentration of chiropractors.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Dentists 146,800 Up 16% at a faster-than-average rate The number of applicants to, and graduates from, dental schools has increased in recent years. Dentists usually complete at least eight years of education beyond high school. All states require licensing. To qualify, candidates must graduate from an accredited dental school and pass written and practical examinations. As an increasing number of dentists from the baby-boom generation reach retirement age, many will retire or work fewer hours and stop taking on new patients. Job prospects should be good, because younger dentists will be able to take over the work of older dentists who retire or cut back on hours, as well as provide dental services to accommodate the growing demand.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Dietitians and Nutritionists 67,400 Up 21% at a faster-than-average rate The importance of diet in preventing and treating illnesses is now well known. In recent years, interest in the role of food in promoting health and wellness has increased, particularly as a part of preventive health care in medical settings. In addition to employment growth, job openings will result from the need to replace experienced workers who retire or leave the occupation for other reasons. Demand for dietitians should be particularly strong in outpatient care facilities, offices of physicians, and food service management.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Diagnostic Medical Sonographers 58,800 Up 46% at a much faster-than-average rate Although hospitals remain the primary employer of diagnostic medical sonographers, employment is projected to grow more rapidly in physicians’ offices and in medical and diagnostic laboratories. Employment in these health care settings is projected to increase because of a shift toward outpatient care whenever possible.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Medical and Clinical Laboratory Technologists and Technicians 325,800 Up 22% at a much faster-than-average rate Clinical laboratory technologists usually have a bachelor’s degree with a major in medical technology or one of the life sciences; clinical laboratory technicians generally have either an associate degree or a certificate. Job opportunities are expected to be excellent. An increase in the aging population will lead to a greater need to diagnose medical conditions through laboratory procedures. Medical laboratory technologists and technicians will be in demand, to use and maintain the equipment needed for diagnosis and treatment.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Medical and Health Services Managers 315,500 Up 23% at a much faster-than-average rate A master’s degree is the standard credential for most positions, although a bachelor’s degree is adequate for some entry-level positions in smaller facilities. Employment will grow fastest in practitioners’ offices and in home health care services. Applicants with work experience in health care and strong science, business, and management skills should have the best opportunities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Occupational Therapists 113,200 Up 29% at a much faster-than-average rate A master’s degree or higher is required in occupational therapy. Job opportunities should be good for licensed occupational therapists in all settings, particularly in acute hospital, rehabilitation, and orthopedic settings, because the elderly receive most of their treatment in these settings. Occupational therapists with specialized knowledge in a treatment area also will have better job prospects.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Optometrists 33,100 Up 24% at a much faster-than-average rate Licensed optometrists must earn a Doctor of Optometry degree from an accredited optometry school and pass a written and a clinical state board examination. Excellent job opportunities are expected over the next decade because there are only 17 schools of optometry in the United States, resulting in a limited number of graduates each year. This number is not expected to keep pace with demand. However, admission to optometry school is competitive.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Physician Assistants 86,700 Up 38% at a much faster-than-average rate All states require that new PAs complete an accredited, formal education program resulting in a master’s degree. Entrance into a PA program typically requires at least two years of college and some health care experience for admission. Physician assistants, who can perform many of the same services as doctors, are expected to have a larger role in giving routine care because they are more cost-effective than physicians. As more physicians retire or enter specialty areas of medicine, more physician assistants are expected to take on the role of primary care provider. Furthermore, the number of individuals who have access to primary care services will increase as a result of federal health insurance reform. Earnings are high.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Physicians and Surgeons 691,400 Up 18% at a faster-than-average rate To be licensed, physicians must graduate from an accredited medical school, pass a licensing examination, and complete one to seven years of graduate medical education (residency). A few medical schools offer combined undergraduate and medical school programs that last six rather than the customary eight years. New physicians are much less likely to enter solo practice and more likely to work as salaried employees of group medical practices, clinics, hospitals, or health networks.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Physical Therapists 204,200 Up 36% at a much faster-than-average rate Employment is expected to increase much faster than the average, as growth in the number of individuals with disabilities or limited function spurs demand for therapy services. After graduating from an accredited doctoral physical therapist educational program, therapists must pass a licensure exam before they can practice. About two-thirds of physical therapists work either in hospitals or in offices of physical therapists.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Pharmacists 286,400 Up 14% at an average rate Pharmacists must have a Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree from an accredited pharmacy program. They also must be licensed, which requires passing licensure and law exams. The population is aging, and older people typically use more prescription medicines than younger people. Higher rates of chronic diseases such as diabetes among all age groups will also lead to increased demand for prescription medications.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Registered Nurses 2,711,500 Up 19% at a faster-than-average rate In all states, students must graduate from an approved nursing program and pass a national licensing examination in order to obtain a nursing license. Growth will occur for a number of reasons, including an increased emphasis on preventive care; growing rates of chronic conditions, such as diabetes and obesity; and demand for health care services from the baby-boomer population, as they live longer and more active lives. Almost two-thirds of nurses work in hospitals.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Radiologic Technologists 119,200 Up 21% at a faster-than-average rate Formal training programs in radiography range in length from one to four years and lead to a graduate certificate, associate degree, or bachelor’s degree. Two-year associate degree programs are most prevalent. Although hospitals will remain the primary employer, a greater number of new jobs will be found in physicians’ offices and diagnostic imaging centers.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Speech-Language Pathologists 134,100 Up 19% at a faster-than-average rate Employment of speech-language pathologists is expected to grow rapidly because the expanding population in older age groups is prone to medical conditions that result in speech, language, and swallowing problems. About half work in educational services, and most others are employed by health care and social assistance facilities. A master’s degree in speech-language pathology is the standard credential. A clinical doctoral degree is the new standard credential for audiologists.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Veterinarians 70,300 Up 12% at an average rate Graduation from an accredited college of veterinary medicine and a state license are required. Most applicants to veterinary school have a bachelor’s degree and the professional veterinary medicine program typically takes four years to complete. Candidates can expect strong competition for most veterinarian positions. Job seekers with specializations and prior work experience should have the best job opportunities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

- Shaded areas indicate career fields for which preparation is not offered by RIT.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Restaurant and Foodservice Managers 321,400 Up 2% Most new jobs will arise in foodservice and drinking places as the number of establishments increases along with the population. Job opportunities should be best for food service managers with several years of work experience in a restaurant or food service establishment. Jobseekers with a combination of work experience in food service and a bachelor’s degree in hospitality, restaurant, or food service management should have an edge when competing for jobs at upscale restaurants.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Hotel (Lodging) Managers 50,400 Up 1% As in other hotel occupations, night and weekend work is common. College graduates with degrees in hotel or restaurant management should have the best job opportunities. Those seeking jobs at hotels with the highest level of guest services are expected to face strong competition, as these positions are highly sought after by people trained in hospitality management or administration.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Travel Agents 73,300 Down 12% Applicants with formal training should have the best opportunities to get a job as a travel agent. Agents who specialize in specific destinations, luxury travel, or particular types of travelers such as ethnic groups or groups with a special interest or hobby should have the best chance for success. Clients who want customized travel experiences, such as adventure tours, will continue to require the expertise of agents. However, the ability of travelers to use the Internet to research vacations and book their own trips is expected to continue to suppress demand for travel agents.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Biological Scientists 29,200 Up 19% at a faster-than-average rate A doctoral degree usually is required for independent research, but a master’s degree is sufficient for some jobs in applied research or product development. A bachelor’s degree is adequate for some non-research jobs. Doctoral degree holders face considerable competition for independent research positions, particularly in universities; holders of bachelor’s or master’s degrees in biological science can expect better opportunities in non-research positions. Biotechnological research and development will continue to drive employment growth. Those who gain laboratory experience through course work or employment during their undergraduate studies will be the best prepared and have the best chances to gain employment or to enter graduate-level programs.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Biotechnologists 80,200 Up 10% at an average rate Employment of biological technicians should increase, as the growing number of agricultural and medicinal products developed from the results of biotechnology research boosts demand for these workers. Also, an aging population and continued competition among pharmaceutical companies are expected to contribute to the need for innovative and improved drugs, further spurring demand. Most growth in employment will be in professional, scientific, and technical services and in educational services. Applicants who have laboratory experience, either through course work or through previous work experience, should have the best opportunities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Chemists 84,300 Up 2% at a slower-than-average rate A bachelor’s degree in chemistry or a related discipline is the minimum educational requirement; however, many research jobs require a doctorate. Job growth will be concentrated in pharmaceutical and medicine manufacturing companies and in scientific research and development services firms. Graduates with a master’s degree, and particularly those with a doctorate, will enjoy better opportunities than those with a bachelor’s degree.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Environmental Engineers 21,200 Up 30% at a much faster-than-average rate Environmental engineering technicians are expected to grow much faster than the average for all occupations. More environmental engineering technicians will be needed to comply with environmental regulations and to develop methods of cleaning up existing hazards. A shift in emphasis toward preventing problems rather than controlling those that already exist, as well as increasing public health concerns resulting from population growth, also will spur demand.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Foresters and Conservation Scientists 29,800 Up 12% at an average rate Nearly two-thirds of salaried conservation scientists and foresters work for federal, state, or local governments. As a result, there is likely to be a large number of job openings for foresters and conservation scientists in government. In general, workers with a four-year degree from an accredited university program, along with good technical and communication skills, should have the best opportunities for entry-level work.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Geoscientists 33,600 Up 18% at a faster-than-average rate Geoscientists who speak a foreign language and who are willing to work abroad should enjoy the best opportunities. An expected increase in highway building and other infrastructure projects will be a source of jobs for engineering geologists.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Mathematicians 2,900 Up 22% at a much faster-than-average rate Job competition will remain keen because employment in this occupation is relatively small and few new jobs are expected. Doctoral degree holders with a strong background in mathematics and a related discipline, such as engineering or computer science, who apply mathematical theory to real-world problems will have the best job prospects in related occupations. In addition, mathematicians with experience in computer programming will better their job prospects in many occupations.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Physicists 15,600 Up 16% at a faster-than-average rate Scientific research and development services firms and the federal government employ three out of five physicists and astronomers. Most jobs are in basic research and development, usually requiring a doctoral degree; master’s degree holders qualify for many jobs in applied research and development, while bachelor’s degree holders may qualify as technicians or research assistants. Doctoral degree graduates will face competition for basic research jobs.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Statisticians 25,500 Up 13% at an average rate A master’s degree in statistics or mathematics is the minimum educational requirement for most jobs with this title. Among graduates with a master’s degree in statistics, those with a strong background in an allied field—such as finance, biology, engineering, or computer science—should have the best prospect of finding jobs related to their field of study.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

- Shaded areas indicate career fields for which preparation is not offered by RIT.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Correctional Officers 469,500 Up 5% at a slower-than-average rate The work can be stressful and dangerous. Although some demand for correctional officers will occur over the coming decade, anticipated budget constraints and a general downward trend in crime rates in recent years will likely mitigate employment growth.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Mental Health Counselors 166,300 Up 29% at a much faster-than-average rate A master’s degree is often required to be licensed or certified as a counselor. Growth is expected as more people have mental health counseling services covered by their insurance policies. Furthermore, increasing numbers of people are expected to seek treatment for mental and emotional problems than in earlier decades. As the population grows, the number of individuals entering therapy is expected to increase, as well. This trend will cause continued demand for counselors in mental health centers, hospitals, and colleges.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Economists 16,900 Up 14% at an average rate Employment of economists is expected to grow about as fast as the average; most new jobs will arise in private industry, including economic research and consulting firms. Candidates who hold a master’s or doctoral degree in economics will have the best employment prospects and advancement opportunities. Quantitative skills are important in all economics specialties.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Lawyers 759,800 Up 10% at an average rate Formal educational requirements for lawyers include a four-year college degree, three years in law school, and the passing of a written bar examination. Demand for lawyers will be spurred by the growth of legal action in such areas as health care, intellectual property, international law, elder law, environmental law, and sexual harassment. Graduates with superior academic records from well-regarded law schools will have the best job opportunities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Police and Detectives 780,000 Up 5% at a slower-than-average rate Civil service regulations govern the appointment of police and detectives. Competition should remain keen for higher paying jobs with state and federal agencies and police departments in affluent areas; opportunities will be better in local and special police departments that offer relatively low salaries or in urban communities where the crime rate is relatively high. Applicants with college training in police science or military police experience should have the best opportunities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Reporters, Correspondents, and News Analysts 57,600 Down 13% Consolidation and convergence should continue in the publishing and broadcasting industries. As a result, companies will be better able to allocate their news analysts, reporters, and correspondents to cover news stories. Since broadcasting and newspapers—the two industries employing most of these workers—are dependent on advertising revenue, employment growth will suffer during an economic downturn. Improving technology may eventually lead to more employment growth in this occupation by opening up new areas of work, such as online or mobile news divisions. The continued demand for news will create some job opportunities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Industrial-organizational Psychologists; Clinical, Counseling, and School Psychologists 1,600; 145,100 Up 53%; Up 11% About 31 percent of psychologists worked in educational services, and 29 percent worked in health care and social assistance. Nearly one-third of all psychologists were self-employed. Most specialists, including clinical and counseling psychologists, need a doctoral degree; school and industrial-organizational psychologists need a master’s degree. Opportunities in psychology are limited for those with only a bachelor’s degree.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Social Workers 607,300 Up 19% at a faster-than-average rate While a bachelor’s degree is the minimum requirement, a master’s degree in social work or a related field has become the standard for many positions. Employment growth will be driven by increased demand for health care and social services, but will vary by specialty.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Urban and Regional Planners 38,700 Up 10% at an average rate Local governments employ seven out of 10 urban and regional planners. Most entry-level jobs require a master’s degree; bachelor’s degree holders may find some entry-level positions, but advancement opportunities are limited. Most new jobs will arise in affluent, rapidly growing urban and suburban communities.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

- Shaded areas indicate career fields for which preparation is not offered by RIT.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

Occupation Employment, 2012 Job Outlook to 2022 Job Requirements and Prospects
Producers and Directors 103,500 Up 3% at a slower-than-average rate Some job growth in the motion picture and video industry is expected to stem from strong demand from the public for more movies and television shows, as well as an increased demand from foreign audiences for U.S.-produced films. In addition, production companies are experimenting with new content delivery methods, such as mobile and online TV, which may lead to more work opportunities for producers and directors in the future. These delivery methods are still in their early stages, however, and their potential for success is not entirely known.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Craft and Fine Artists including Painters, Sculptors, and Illustrators 51,400 Up 3% at a slower-than-average rate More than half of all artists and related workers are self-employed—almost eight times the proportion for all professional and related occupations. Artists usually develop their skills through a bachelor’s degree program or other postsecondary training in art or design. Keen competition is expected for both salaried jobs and freelance work, because many talented people are attracted to the visual arts.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Graphic Designers 259,500 Up 7% at a slower-than-average rate The change in employment of graphic designers from 2012 to 2022 is projected to vary by industry. Employment of graphic designers in newspaper, periodical, book, and directory publishers is projected to decline 16 percent from 2012 to 2022. However, employment of graphic designers in computer systems design and related services is projected to grow 35 percent over the same period. With the increased use of the Internet, graphic designers will be needed to create designs and images for portable devices, websites, electronic publications, and video entertainment media.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Industrial Designers 39,200 Up 4% at a slower-than-average rate Consumer demand for new products and new product styles should sustain the demand for industrial designers. Employment in the manufacturing industry is projected to experience a slight decline over the projection period contributing to the slower-than-average growth for industrial designers. Employment of industrial designers who design precision instruments and medical equipment is likely to grow more rapidly. Both areas require a high degree of technical ability and design sophistication.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Interior Designers 54,900 Up 13% at an average rate Rising demand for interior design of private homes, offices, restaurants and other retail establishments, and institutions that care for the rapidly growing elderly population should spur employment growth of interior designers. Creativity is crucial in all design occupations; most designers need a bachelor’s degree, and candidates with a master’s degree hold an advantage.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Photographers 136,300 Up 4% at a slower-than-average rate Competition for jobs is expected to be keen because the work is attractive to many people. Technical expertise, imagination, and creativity are essential, and university-level preparation can greatly enhance a photographer’s skill and experience set. More than half of all photographers are self-employed; the most successful are able to adapt to rapidly changing technologies and are adept at operating a business.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Public Relations Specialists 229,100 Up 12% at an average rate Competition is expected for entry-level jobs. Opportunities should be best for college graduates who combine a degree in public relations, journalism, or another communications-related field with a public relations internship or other related work experience. The ability to communicate effectively is essential.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Technical Writers 49,500 Up 15% at a faster-than-average rate Job prospects, especially for applicants with solid communication and technical skills, are expected to be good. The growing reliance on technologically sophisticated products in the home and the workplace and the increasing complexity of medical or scientific information needed for daily living will create many new job opportunities for technical writers. However, competition will exist for technical writing positions with more desirable companies and for workers who are new to the occupation.
More information is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.
Authors and Writers; Editors 129,100; 115,300 Up 3%; Down 2% Most jobs in this occupation require a college degree in communications, journalism, or English. The outlook for most writing and editing jobs is expected to be competitive, because many people with writing or journalism training are attracted to the occupation. Online publications and services are growing in number and sophistication, spurring the demand for writers and editors, especially those with Web experience.
More information on authors, writers, and editors is available on the Bureau of Labor Statistics website.

A list of relevant RIT academic programs is available on the Programs of Study website.

Other helpful sites for this career field

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Career Outcomes for the RIT Class of 2015

Each year RIT gathers information about the career plans of its graduates in accordance with national standards established for the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). These outcome summaries are provided for both the university overall and each RIT college at both the undergraduate and advanced degree candidate levels and reflect the career activities of graduates within 6 months of their degree certification.

Trending career outcome data suggest demand for RIT graduates remains very strong. Over the past three years the overall outcome rate for graduates in all degree programs averaged 94.5%.

Undergraduate Outcomes

Outcomes Rate

95.2%

Employed

78.3%

Further Full-time Study

14.3%

Alternative Plans

2.6%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 2,260

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

Knowledge rate: 91.3% (The percentage of graduates for whom RIT has verifiable information.)

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

97%

Employed

88%

Further Full-time Study

6%

Alternative Plans

3%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 301

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

95.9%

Employed

80.9%

Further Full-time Study

10.7%

Alternative Plans

4.3%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 183

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

96.4%

Employed

89.3%

Further Full-time Study

6.2%

Alternative Plans

0.9%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 439

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

96.7%

Employed

65.2%

Further Full-time Study

28.6%

Alternative Plans

2.9%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 417

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

95.6%

Employed

64.1%

Further Full-time Study

29.4%

Alternative Plans

2.1%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 104

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

95.3%

Employed

87.1%

Further Full-time Study

6.3%

Alternative Plans

1.9%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 453

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

94.7%

Employed

67.4%

Further Full-time Study

18.4%

Alternative Plans

8.9%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 115

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

There are more than 1,200 deaf and hard-of-hearing students enrolled at RIT in academic programs at nearly all degree levels offered by the university. Outcomes for bachelor’s degree graduates are included in the other RIT college listings. Additional information about the career outcomes for associate degree graduates of National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), as well as for graduates of the bachelor’s degree program in ASL-English interpretation, is available at the NTID Center on Employment.

Outcomes Rate

85.3%

Employed

49%

Further Full-time Study

34.5%

Alternative Plans

1.8%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 156

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

90.3%

Employed

78.4%

Further Full-time Study

9.5%

Alternative Plans

2.4%

Bachelor’s degrees awarded: 103

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Graduate Outcomes

Outcomes Rate

96.3%

Employed

85.9%

Further Full-time Study

7.6%

Alternative Plans

2.8%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 998

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

Knowledge rate: 93.5% (The percentage of graduates for whom RIT has verifiable information.)

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

97.1%

Employed

82.6%

Further Full-time Study

9.2%

Alternative Plans

5.3%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 114

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

89.6%

Employed

74.2%

Further Full-time Study

8.1%

Alternative Plans

7.3%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 126

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

97.8%

Employed

94.7%

Further Full-time Study

3.1%

Alternative Plans

0%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 249

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

97.8%

Employed

87.4%

Further Full-time Study

7.8%

Alternative Plans

2.6%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 54

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

100%

Employed

100.0%

Further Full-time Study

0%

Alternative Plans

0%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 11

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

97.1%

Employed

92.2%

Further Full-time Study

4.9%

Alternative Plans

0%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 113

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

97.1%

Employed

85.7%

Further Full-time Study

11.4%

Alternative Plans

0%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 41

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuingalternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes for deaf and hard-of-hearing master’s degree graduates are included in the other RIT college listings. Outcome information for the graduates of the master of science program in secondary education from National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID) is available at the NTID Center on Employment.

Outcomes Rate

93.9%

Employed

58.8%

Further Full-time Study

25.5%

Alternative Plans

9.6%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 54

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

93.3%

Employed

93.3%

Further Full-time Study

0%

Alternative Plans

0%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 17

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.

Outcomes Rate

96.8%

Employed

83.9%

Further Full-time Study

12.9%

Alternative Plans

0%

Master’s and doctoral degrees awarded: 36

Outcomes rate describes the percentage of graduates who have entered the workforce, enrolled for further full-time study, or are pursuing alternative plans. Alternative plans include military service, volunteer service and those not seeking employment at this time.

For career outcomes information see Academic Overviews by College.