Jesús H. Aguilar

Jesús H. Aguilar

Professor
(585) 475-7683

Jesús H. Aguilar

Professor
Ph.D. McGill University, 2003
Philosophy of Action, Philosophy of Mind, Latin-American Philosophy

Jesús Aguilar received his Ph.D. from McGill University in 2003. He is interested in a broad spectrum of issues in the philosophy of action, philosophy of mind, Latin-American Philosophy, and metaphilosophy. Among these issues are the nature of agency, the problem of causal deviance, the control of basic actions, multiple realization, mental causation, the nature of thought experiments, and the role of imagination in philosophical thinking. His recent publications have explored some of these topics.

Silvia Benso

Silvia Benso

Professor
(585) 475-4116

Silvia Benso

Professor
Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, 1993
Contemporary European Philosophy, Ancient Philosophy, History of Philosophy

Silvia Benso has been Professor of Philosophy at RIT since Winter 2008. After doing her undergraduate work in philosophy at the University of Torino, Italy, and studying in Germany for almost two years, she graduated with a Ph.D. in philosophy from Penn State University, USA. Among her areas of interest and specialization are ancient philosophy, contemporary European philosophy, the history of philosophy, ethics, aesthetics, and feminist theories. Besides having published articles on Nietzsche, Heidegger, Levinas, and ancient philosophy (especially Plato), she is the author of Thinking After Auschwitz: Philosophical Ethics and Jewish Theodicy (in Italian), The Face of Things: A Different Side of Ethics, and the co-author of the volume Environmental Thinking: Between Philosophy and Ecology (in Italian). She has also co-edited the volumes Contemporary Italian Philosophy: Between Ethics, Politics and Religion, Levinas and the Ancients, and Between Nihilism and Politics: The Hermeneutics of Gianni Vattimo. She is the general co-editor for the series Contemporary Italian Philosophy published by SUNY Press.

Evelyn Brister

Evelyn Brister

Associate Professor
(585) 475-4291

Evelyn Brister

Associate Professor
Ph.D. Northwestern University, 2002
Philosophy of Science, Environmental Philosophy, Feminist Philosophy

Evelyn Brister is an associate professor specializing in philosophy of science and environmental philosophy, with a focus on the role of values in ecology and ecological applications.

She regularly teaches lower-level courses in ethics and critical thinking and upper-level courses in philosophy of science and environmental philosophy, with an occasional course on logic, feminist theory, or epistemology.

Presently she is engaged in several research projects. One examines the value assumptions involved in ecological restoration and in land management more generally. Another investigates the potential and actual conflicts between preserving biodiversity and pursuing social justice. She also writes on feminist philosophy and does work in the Environmental Science program at RIT on the presettlement vegetation of western New York.

Her recent articles include:

  • “Feminist Epistemology, Feminist Contextualism, and Philosophical Skepticism,” Metaphilosophy, 2009.
  • “On Scientific Advocacy: Putting Values and Interests in Their Place.” In Science at the Frontiers: Perspectives on the History and Philosophy of Science, ed. William Krieger, Lexington Books, 20
  • “Distributing Epistemic Authority: Refining Norton’s Pragmatist Approach to Environmental Decision-making,“ Contemporary Pragmatism, 2012.
  • “Diversification of Land Management Goals and Strategies in Response to Climate Change,” Ethics, Policy, and Environment, 2013 (Co-authored with Elizabeth Hane).
  • “Using Illustrative Case Studies: A Case in Teaching Climate Ethics,” forthcoming in Teaching Ethics

 

For more detailed information on what she’s thinking about right now, visit Evelyn’s blog, Knowledge and Experience:

http://knowledgeandexperience.blogspot.com/

John Capps

John Capps

Professor
(585) 475-2464

John Capps

Professor
Ph.D. Northwestern University, 1997
Epistemology, Pragmatism, History of Analytic Philosophy

John Capps received his Ph.D from Northwestern University in 1997. The focus of his research is within epistemology and the philosophy of science, where he has been influenced by the work of classical American pragmatists. Recent publications have examined the justification of philosophical naturalism, the limits of scientific pluralism, and the context sensitivity of epistemic standards.

Timothy H. Engström

Timothy H. Engström

Professor
(585) 475-2457

Timothy H. Engström

Professor
Ph.D. Edinburgh University, 1987
Comparative European and Anglo-American Philosophy, Pragmatism, Critical Theory, Aesthetics, Social and Political Philosophy, Rhetorical Theory

Tim Engström is a New York stater who studied initially in New York, then in Sweden, Britain, and Germany—Tübingen and Göttingen—then went back to Edinburgh, Scotland, for his Ph.D. When not inside, he’s outside; when not teaching, reading or writing, he tinkers with an old house or old stuff or travels to avoid having to fix the old stuff. He taught first at the University of Hawaii before coming to RIT, where he’s been since 1988. He prefers the Adirondacks to strip malls, skiing to faculty meetings, fictional truth to logical truth, old vehicles to new vehicles, some philosophy books to other philosophy books.

Dane R. Gordon

Dane R. Gordon

Professor Emeritus

Dane R. Gordon

Professor Emeritus
M.A. Cambridge University, 1956 M.A. University of Rochester, 1960
Philosophy of Religion, Ethics
Colin Mathers

Colin Mathers

Lecturer
(585) 475-5395

Colin Mathers

Lecturer
Ph.D. University of Rochester, 1998
Ethics, Applied Ethics

Although Colin’s area of specialization in graduate school was Epistemology, his interests have turned to questions of both Ethical Theory as well as Applied Ethics topics. When Colin is not engaged in deep philosophical thought, he spends time listening to jazz and enjoys playing bridge.

Irina Mikhalevich

Irina Mikhalevich

Assistant Professor
(585) 475-6036

Irina Mikhalevich

Assistant Professor
Ph.D. Boston University, 2014

Irina Mikhalevich received her Ph.D. from Boston University in 2014 under the supervision of Alisa Bokulich and Colin Allen (Indiana University). Prior to joining RIT, she held the McDonnell Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Philosophy-Neuroscience-Psychology (PNP) Program at Washington University in St. Louis and a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Berlin School of Mind and Brain at Humboldt University in Berlin, Germany. Most recently, she spent one year as a visiting researcher at Northeastern University.

Her work lies at the intersection of the philosophy of science, the philosophy of cognitive science, and ethics, with a focus on the nature and science of animal minds. Her research examines conceptual and methodological problems in comparative (animal) cognition science and their implications for the treatment of nonhuman animals.

For more information, including publications and current projects, please visit her website at irinamikhalevich.com

Peggy Noll

Peggy Noll

Staff Assistant
(585) 475-6095

Peggy Noll

Staff Assistant
Wade L. Robison

Wade L. Robison

Ezra A. Hale Professor of Applied Ethics
(585) 475-6643

Wade L. Robison

Ezra A. Hale Professor of Applied Ethics
Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, 1968
Ethics, History of Modern Philosophy, Social and Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Law

Wade L. Robison is the Ezra A. Hale Professor of Applied Ethics at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He received his Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Wisconsin at Madison, with a minor in law. He directed a National Endowment for the Humanities Institute on David Hume at Dartmouth in 1990, has received several National Endowment for the Humanities fellowships, including a year-long fellowship in Political Science at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He was President of the International Hume Society for sixteen years and is active in Ethics Across the Curriculum at RIT and elsewhere. He has published extensively in philosophy of law, David Hume, and practical and professional ethics. His book Decisions in Doubt: The Environment and Public Policy (University Press of New England, 1994) won the Nelson A. Rockefeller Prize in Social Science and Public Policy. He has co-edited anthologies in medical ethics, business and professional ethics, and Hume, and his most recent book, with L. Reeser, is on Ethical Decision Making in Social Work (Allyn & Bacon, 2000).

John T. Sanders

John T. Sanders

Professor
(585) 475-2465

John T. Sanders

Professor
Ph.D. Boston University, 1977
Social and Political Philosophy, Philosophy of Science, Ethics, Epistemology, Metaphysics

Jack Sanders was born and raised in Chicago. He received a double B.A. degree (two independent degrees) in Philosophy and Psychology from Purdue University in 1968, having also spent an academic year (1966–67) at the Universität Hamburg, in Germany. He then received his M.A. (1972) and Ph.D. (1977) in Philosophy from Boston University.

Jack has been teaching at RIT since September 1976. He has served as Chair of the Department of Philosophy three times, from 1977–1982, from 1986–1988, and from 2001 to 2004. He was RIT’s chief judicial officer from 1987–1988. He has twice been awarded the Eisenhart Annual Award for Outstanding Teaching at RIT, in 1979–1980 and in 2000–2001.

During 1995–1996 Jack was a visiting Fulbright professor at the Graduate School for Social Research in the Institute of Philosophy and Sociology of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Warsaw, and he has also been a visiting faculty member at the University of Helsinki. He served on the faculty at the U.S. Business School in Prague from 1997 to 2004.

Jack is the author and editor of several books, and has written more than thirty published articles in a variety of areas of Philosophy. He is also the author of the scripts for five of the audio presentations in Knowledge Products’s Science and Discovery series. He has lectured in many places both in the United States and Europe.

While philosophy still remains Jack’s favorite leisure activity, he has also recently been bitten by the genealogy bug.

Brian Schroeder

Brian Schroeder

Professor and Department Chair
(585) 475-6346

Brian Schroeder

Professor and Department Chair
Ph.D. Stony Brook University, 1990 M.Div. Princeton Theological Seminary, 1984
Post-Kantian European Philosophy, Philosophy of Religion, East Asian Philosophy, Environmental Philosophy, History of Philosophy

Brian Schroeder is Professor and Chair of Philosophy and Director of Religious Studies at Rochester Institute of Technology. He has published widely on contemporary European philosophy, the history of philosophy, environmental philosophy, Buddhist philosophy, the Kyoto School, social and political philosophy, and the philosophy of religion. He is co-editor with Silvia Benso of the SUNY Press Series in Contemporary Italian Philosophy. Currently an associate officer of the Comparative and Continental Philosophy Circle and an executive committee member of the Society for Italian Philosophy, Schroeder is formerly co-director of the Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy, co-director and chair of the board of the International Association for Environmental Philosophy, director of the Collegium Phaenomenologicum, and an executive committee member of the Nietzsche Society. For more information, including publications, please go to https://rit.academia.edu/sbs.

Brian is also an ordained Sōtō Zen priest and the Buddhist chaplain at RIT, where he guides the Idunno Zen Community. For more information, please go to https://vimeo.com/212931642/ad9f557d3b

Evan Selinger

Evan Selinger

Professor
(585) 475-2531

Evan Selinger

Professor
Ph.D. Stony Brook University, 2003
Philosophy of Technology, Philosophy of Science, Phenomenology

Evan Selinger, Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the Rochester Institute of Technology, received his Ph.D. in Philosophy at Stony Brook University in 2003. His research covers a range of issues in the philosophies of technology and expertise. For information on his publications, teaching, speaking engagements, and sponsored research see:

Professor Selinger’s Home Page

David B. Suits

David B. Suits

Professor Emeritus
(585) 475-2463

David B. Suits

Professor Emeritus
Ph.D. University of Waterloo, 1977
Philosophy of Death, Philosophy of Mind, Philosophy of Law, Anarchism, Fiction

David Suits received his M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Waterloo, and an M.S. in Computer Science from R.I.T. His research interests include the Philosophy of Death, the Philosophy of Mind, Ethics, Anarchism, the Philosophy of Fiction, and experimentation with artificial neural networks. When he is not giving courses on the logic of tools, he is not editing any journal which does not exist, such as The Defunct Quarterly Review of Parmenidean Humour.

Go to Suits’s Personal Home Page

Katie Terezakis

Katie Terezakis

Associate Professor
(585) 475-2019

Katie Terezakis

Associate Professor
Ph.D. New School for Social Research, 2004
Aesthetics, German Idealism and Romanticism, History of Philosophy

Katie Terezakis received her Ph.D. in Philosophy in 2004 from the New School for Social Research. Her research interests include German Idealism, Critical Theory, Aesthetics, and the Phenomenology of Language. She has published numerous articles and book chapters and is the author of The Immanent Word: The Turn to Language in German Philosophy, 1759–1801 (Routledge, 2007); the editor of Engaging Agnes Heller: A Critical Companion (Lexington Books, 2009), and the co-editor, with Jack Sanders, of Lukács’s Soul and Form (with a New Introduction by Judith Butler and an Afterword by Katie Terezakis) (Columbia University Press, 2010).

Most recently, Professor Terezakis received the Eisenhart Award for Outstanding Teaching (2015); the John William Miller Fellowship (2011); and the Paul A. and Francena L. Miller Fellowship (2010).

Terezakis’s personal web site

Professor Terezakis's Academia page

Lawrence Torcello

Lawrence Torcello

Associate Professor
(585) 475-2327

Lawrence Torcello

Associate Professor
Ph.D. University at Buffalo, 2006
Social and Political Philosophy, Ethics, Applied Ethics, Bioethics

Lawrence Torcello specializes in social and political philosophy, moral theory, and applied ethics. His current research interests focus on democratic theory, liberalism, and issues of climate justice. Recent work explores the moral implications of climate change denialism and other forms of science denial.

Go to Torcello’s Personal Home Page