Malware RSS Feed

Leave your passwords at the Checkout Desk

Malware Alerts - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 04:20

Hotels, Restaurants and Airports used to offer customers free tablets while using their facilities. Recently while attending an event and staying in one such hotel, I had the chance to use a free iPad especially installed in my room.

To my surprise, it not only contained the event agenda and provided a free WiFi connection, but also included a lot of private personal information from previous guests who had stayed in the same room.

When I speak about private personal information, I mean accounts with pre-saved passwords, authorized sessions on social networks, search results from the browser (mostly pornographic content), full contacts automatically saved into the address book, iMessages and even a pregnancy calculator with real information. It was not hard even to figure out that the identity of the woman who had used it, since she also left her personal contact information on the device:

Having full names and email addresses cached on the device, it was not hard to Google a little bit and find out that some of the users were very public people working for the government of the country where I was staying.

Most of sessions were still open, even allowing the posting / sending of messages in the name of the user:

This is completely unacceptable, from a security perspective. Basically a potential attacker had the chance not only read sent and received messages but also to impersonate the victim by sending messages in their name.

I also see this scenario as a perfect personal data collector for high profile spear phishing campaigns. On the other hand, if a potential attacker came from a classic cybercrime sphere, they might blackmail their victims. Moreover, it would be extremely easy for the criminal to do this, since they would have all kinds of data of the victims, including the name of pornographic movies watched on each specific date and time. Bearing in mind that some of the potential victims are public people and work for the government, most probably such blackmail would be successful.

So, what's wrong here? Well, I would say everything. First, it is unwise to use a free public device for personal and private communication. You just never know if the device is backdoored or who might be behind such hospitality? Second, if a public facility wants to offer its guests free portable devices for the duration of their stay, it's important that such devices are a properly configured first, to apply sensible security policies such as not storing personal information, not saving passwords and so on.

Maybe I'm too suspicious, but having an unknown and untrusted device like a tablet in my room, which is equipped with an embedded camera and a mic, I just preferred to switch it off and store it inside a drawer. I had to do this every afternoon since the cleaning staff put it back  on the desk every day I was at the hotel.

You have also remember that, even if such a free device is properly configured and does not visibly store any private information, you can't be sure that the next guest is not an expert in forensic analysis, in which case they could just take an image of the whole device and then recover your personal information step by step.

You may follow me on twitter: @dimitribest

Android NFC hack allow users to have free rides in public transportation

Malware Alerts - Tue, 10/21/2014 - 12:39

"Tarjeta BIP!" is the electronic payment system used in Chile to pay for public transportation via NFC incorporated in the user's smartphone. Numerous projects enabling mobile NFC ticketing for public transportation have been already executed worldwide. This is a trend. It means that criminal minds should be interested in it. Moreover, they are.

More and more people keep talking about the feature of payments via NFC. The problem in this particular case is that somebody reversed the "Tarjeta BIP!" cards and found a means to re-charge them for free. So, on Oct. 16 the very first widely-available app for Android appeared, allowing users to load these transportation cards with 10k Chilean pesos, a sum  equal to approximately $17 USD.

MD5 (PuntoBIP.apk) = 06a676fd9b104fd12a25ee5bd1874176

Immediately after appearing on the Internet, many users downloaded it and proved they were able to recharge their travel cards. All they had to do is to install the mentioned app on a NFC capable Android device, to approach the travel card to the phone and then to push the button "Cargar 10k", which means "Refill the card with 10,000" Chilean pesos.

According to the metadata of the .dex file package, it was compiled on October 16, 2014 and it has 884.5 kB (884491 Byte) size. The feature it incorporates interacts directly with the NFC port: android.hardware.nfc

The app has four main features: "número BIP" - to get the number of the card, "saldo BIP" - to get the available balance, "Data carga" - to refill available balance and finally, maybe the most interesting is "cambiar número BIP" - allowing the user to change the card number altogether. Why would we say this last feature is the most interesting? Well, a source suggested the authorities were going to block fraudulently refilled BIP cards. However, as we can see, the app is able to change the BIP number.

Since the original links to download the app were taken down, new links appeared, now pointing to new servers and actually hosting a new app:

MD5 (PuntoBIP-Reloaded.apk) = 2c20d1823699ae9600dad9cd59e03021

This is a modified version of the previous app, compiled on the next business day Oct 17, 2014 and which is a lot bigger 2.7 MB (2711229 Byte). This includes an advertisement module which shows ads via the doubleclick network.

Since both apps allow users to hack a legitimate application, they are now detected by Kaspersky as HEUR:HackTool.AndroidOS.Stip.a

Since the app is a hot one and a lot of people from Chile are looking for it, I expect some bad guys to come along and create fake similar apps but trojanized to infect mobile users and take some advantage of their interest.

At the same time, it is important to mention that mobile payments are getting more and more popular. NFC is one of the most promising ports in this field. This is a good example of how fresh new payment schemes often present the same old problems.

Thanks to Roman Unuchek for his analytical insights.

You may follow me on twitter: @dimitribest

The Ventir Trojan: assemble your MacOS spy

Malware Alerts - Thu, 10/16/2014 - 10:00

We got an interesting file (MD5 9283c61f8cce4258c8111aaf098d21ee) for analysis a short while ago. It turned out to be a sample of modular malware for MacOS X. Even after preliminary analysis it was clear that the file was not designed for any good purpose: an ordinary 64-bit mach-o executable contained several more mach-o files in its data section; it set one of them to autorun, which is typical of Trojan-Droppers.

Further investigation showed that a backdoor, a keylogger and a Trojan-Spy were hidden inside the sample. It is particularly noteworthy that the keylogger uses an open-source kernel extension. The extension's code is publicly available, for example, on GitHub!

Depending on their purpose, these files are detected by Kaspersky Lab antivirus solutions as Trojan-Dropper.OSX.Ventir.a, Backdoor.OSX.Ventir.a, Trojan-Spy.OSX.Ventir.a and not-a-virus:Monitor.OSX.LogKext.c.

Source file (Trojan-Dropper.OSX.Ventir.a)

As soon as it is launched, the dropper checks whether it has root access by calling the geteuid () function. The result of the check determines where the Trojan's files will be installed:

  • If it has root access, the files will be installed in /Library/.local and /Library/LaunchDaemons;
  • If it does not have root access, the files will be installed in ~/Library/.local and ~/Library/LaunchAgents ("~" stands for the path to the current user's home directory).

All files of the Trojan to be downloaded to the victim machine are initially located in the "__data" section of the dropper file.

Location of the Trojan's files inside the dropper

As a result, the following files will be installed on the infected system:

  1. Library/.local/updated – re-launches files update and EventMonitor in the event of unexpected termination.
  2. Library/.local/reweb – used to re-launch the file updated.
  3. Library/.local/update – the backdoor module.
  4. Library/.local/libweb.db – the malicious program's database file. Initially contains the Trojan's global settings, such as the C&C address.
  5. Library/LaunchAgents (or LaunchDaemons)/com.updated.launchagent.plist – the properties file used to set the file Library/.local/updated to autorun using the launchd daemon.
  6. Depending on whether root access is available:

    А) if it is – /Library/.local/kext.tar. The following files are extracted from the archive:

    • updated.kext – the driver that intercepts user keystrokes
    • Keymap.plist – the map which matches the codes of the keys pressed by the user to the characters associated with these codes;
    • EventMonitor – the agent which logs keystrokes as well as certain system events to the following file: Library/.local/.logfile.

    B) if it isn't – ~/Library/.local/EventMonitor. This is the agent that logs the current active window name and the keystrokes to the following file: Library/.local/.logfile

After installing these files, the Trojan sets the file updated to autorun using launchctl – the standard console utility (launchctl load% s/com.updated.launchagent.plist command).

Next, if root access is available, the dropper loads the logging driver into the kernel using the standard utility OSX kextload (kextload /System/Library/Extensions/updated.kext command)

After that, Trojan-Dropper.OSX.Ventir.a launches the file reweb and removes itself from the system.

Updated and reweb files

The file updated terminates all processes with the name reweb (killall -9 reweb command). After that, it regularly checks whether the processes EventMonitor and update are running and restarts them if necessary.

The file reweb terminates all processes with the names updated and update and then runs the file Library/.local/updated.

Update (Backdoor.OSX.Ventir.a) file

The backdoor first allocates the field values from the config table of the libweb.db database to local variables for further use.

To receive commands from C&C, the  malware uses an HTTP GET request in the following format: http://220.175.13.250:82/macsql.php?mode=getcmd&key=1000&udid=000C29174BA0, where key is some key stored in libweb.db in the config table; udid is the MAC address and 220.175.13.250:82 is the IP-address and port of the C & C server.

This request is sent regularly at short intervals in an infinite loop.

The backdoor can process the following commands from C&C:

  • reboot – restart the computer;
  • restart – restart the backdoor by launching reweb file;
  • uninstall – completely remove the backdoor from the system
  • show config – send data from the config table to the C&C server;
  • down exec – update the file update, download it from the C&C-server;
  • down config – update configuration file libweb.db, download it from the C&C server;
  • upload config – send the file libweb.db to the C&C server;
  • update config:[parameters] – update the config table in the libweb.db database file; values of fields from the table are sent as parameters;
  • executeCMD:[ parameter] – execute the command specified in the parameter using the function popen(cmd, "r"); send the command's output to the C & C server;
  • executeSYS:[parameter] – execute the command specified in the parameter using the function system(cmd);
  • executePATH:[parameter] – run file from the Library/.local/ directory; the file name is sent in the parameter;
  • uploadfrompath:[parameter] – upload file with the name specified in the parameter from the Library/.local/ directory to the C&C server;
  • downfile:[parameters] – download file with the name specified in a parameter from the C&C server and save it to the path specified in another parameter.

Some of the commands processed by the backdoor module

EventMonitor (Trojan-Spy.OSX.Ventir.a) file

This file is downloaded to the system if the dropper cannot get root access. Once launched, Trojan-Spy.OSX.Ventir.a installs its own system event handler using Carbon Event Manager API functions. The new handler intercepts all keystroke events and logs them to the file ~/Library/.local/.logfile. Modifier buttons (e.g., shift) are logged as follows: [command], [option], [ctrl], [fn], [ESC], [tab], [backspace], etc.

Keyboard event handler

Immediately before processing a keystroke, the malware determines the name of the process whose window is currently active. To do this, it uses GetFrontProcess and CopyProcessName functions from Carbon API. The name of the process is also logged as [Application {process_name} is the frontwindow]. This enables the Trojan's owner to determine in which application the phrase logged was entered.

kext.tar (not-a-virus:Monitor.OSX.LogKext.c) file

As mentioned above, the kext.tar archive is downloaded to the infected computer if Trojan-Dropper.OSX.Ventir has successfully got root access. The archive contains three files:

  • updated.kext
  • EventMonitor
  • Keymap.plist

The updated.kext software package is an open-source kernel extension (kext) designed to intercept keystrokes. This extension has long been detected by Kaspersky Lab products as not-a-virus:Monitor.OSX.LogKext.c and the source code (as it mentioned earlier) is currently available to the general public.

The file Keymap.plist is a map which matches the codes of keys pressed to their values. The file EventMonitor uses it to determine key values based on the codes provided to it by the file updated.kext.

The file EventMonitor is an agent file that receives data from the updated.kext kernel extension, processes it and records it in the /Library/.local/.logfile log file. Below is a fragment of the log that contains a login and password intercepted by the Trojan

As the screenshot demonstrates, as soon as a victim enters the username and password to his or her email account on yandex.ru, the data is immediately logged and falls into the cybercriminals' hands.

This threat is especially significant in view of the recent leaks of login and password databases from Yandex, Mail.ru and Gmail. It is quite possible that malware from the Ventir family was used to supply data to the databases published by cybercriminals.

In conclusion, it should be noted that Trojan-Dropper.OSX.Ventir.a with its modular structure is similar to the infamous Trojan.OSX.Morcut (aka OSX/Crisis), which had approximately the same number of modules with similar functionality. Using open-source software makes it much easier for cybercriminals to create new malware. This means we can safely assume that the number of Trojan-Spy programs will only grow in the future.

Microsoft Security Updates October 2014

Malware Alerts - Tue, 10/14/2014 - 18:23

This morning was possibly one of the most information rich in the history of Microsoft's patch Tuesdays. Last month, we pointed out the Aurora Panda/DeputyDog actor was losing an IE 0day being patched, and that seemed unusual. This month, several vulnerabilities abused with 0day exploits by known APT actors are being patched and the actors are being publicly noted. So today Microsoft pushes out eight security bulletins MS14-056 through MS14-063, including three rated critical.

The most interesting of today's vulnerabilities are two that are enabled by Windows functionality, but are useful for spearphishing targets with Office-type data file attachments - an Excel file, PowerPoint Show, Word document, and so on. The first of the two remind us of the Duqu attacksMS14-058 patches yet another kernel level font handling flaw CVE-2014-4148, the same kind of issue seen in the Duqu spearphish exploits. This one is rated critical by Microsoft. No one particular actor has been associated with this attack or exploit just yet.

The Windows OLE vulnerability patched with MS14-060 is surprisingly rated "Important" by Microsoft. The APT known as the "Sandworm team" deployed CVE-2014-4114 in incidents against targets alongside other known exploits. The group was known for deploying new variants of the BlackEnergy bot in cyber-espionage campaigns, hitting geopolitical and military targets. In one incident, the team sent spearphish as a PowerPoint slide deck containing the 0day OLE exploit to Ukrainian government and US academic organizations. When opened, the slides dropped newer variants of BlackEnergy to the victim systems. These newer variants of BlackEnergy maintain functionality dedicated to cyber espionage tasks.The most interesting characteristics of these BlackEnergy trojans are the custom plugins or modules, but that's for a different blog post.

Another group known as Hurricane Panda attempted to exploit CVE-2014-4113 in targeted environments. This escalation of privilege issue can present a real problem in situations where an attacker has gotten in to a network and is attempting to burrow in further. This bug also exists in Windows kernel code, and is patched by the same MS14-058 bulletin mentioned above.

The Internet Explorer update addresses fourteen vulnerabilities, rated critical for IE6 through IE11. They do not affect Server Core installations.

More can be read about October 2014 Microsoft Security Bulletins here.

Tic Tac Toe with a twist

Malware Alerts - Fri, 10/10/2014 - 05:00

Attempts by cybercriminals to disguise malware as useful applications are common to the point of being commonplace. However, the developers of Gomal, a new mobile Trojan, not only achieved a new level of camouflage by adding Tic Tac Toe game to their malicious program, but also implemented interesting techniques which are new to this kind of malware.

It all started with a Tic Tac Toe game being sent to us for analysis. At first glance, the app looked quite harmless:

However, the list of permissions requested by the game made us wonder. Why would it need to access the Internet, the user's contacts and the SMS archive or to be able to process calls and record sound? We analyzed the 'game' and it turned out to be a piece of multi-purpose spyware. The malicious app is now detected by Kaspersky Lab products as Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Gomal.a.

A thorough analysis of the malicious program showed that the game code accounts for less than 30% of the executable file's size. The rest is functionality for spying on the user and stealing personal data.

Game code is marked in green, malicious functionality – in red

What does this functionality include? First and foremost, the malware has sound recording functions, which are now standard for mobile spyware:

It also has SMS-stealing functionality:

In addition, the Trojan collects information about the device and sends all the data collected to its masters' server. But Trojan-Spy.AndroidOS.Gomal.a has something really curious up its sleeve – a package of interesting libraries distributed with it.

The package includes an exploit used to obtain root privileges on the Android device. The extended privileges give the app access to various services provided by Linux (the operating system on which Android is based), including the ability to read process memory and /maps.

After obtaining root access, the Trojan gets down to work. For example, it steals emails from Good for Enterprise, if the app is installed on the smartphone. The application is positioned as a secure email client for corporate use, so the theft of data from it can mean serious problems for the company where the owner of the device works. In order to attack Good for Enterprise, the Trojan uses the console to get the ID of the relevant process (ps command) and reads virtual file /proc/ /maps. The file contains information about memory blocks allocated to the application.

After getting the list of memory blocks, the malware finds the block [heap] containing the application's string data and creates its dump using one more library from its package. Next, the dump file created is searched for signatures characteristic of emails and the messages found are sent to the cybercriminals' server.

Gomal also steals data from logcat – the logging service built into Android that is used for application debugging. Developers very often have their applications outputting critically important data to Logcat even after the apps have been released. This enables the Trojan to steal even more confidential data from other programs.

As a result, the seemingly harmless game of Tic Tac Toe gives cybercriminals access to an enormous amount of the user's personal data and corporate data belonging to his employer. The techniques used by Gomal were originally implemented in Windows Trojans, but now, as we can see, they have moved on to Android malware. And, most dangerously, the principles upon which this technique is based can be used to steal data from applications other than Good for Enterprise – it is likely that a range of mobile malware designed to attack popular email clients, messengers and other programs will appear in the near future.

To reduce the risk of infection by mobile malware we recommend that users:
  • Do not activate the "Install applications from third-party sources" option
  • Only install applications from official channels (Google Play, Amazon Store, etc.)
  • When installing new apps, carefully study which rights they request
  • If the requested rights do not correspond with the app's intended functions, do not install the app
  • Use protection software

Pages

Subscribe to RIT Information Security aggregator