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RIT Nanoimaging Labratory

Facilities

JEOL 2010 Transmission Electron Microscope
JEOL 2010 Transmission Electron Microscope

This microscope is used as a materials science characterization tool and operates between 80 and 200 kV. It is optimized for inorganic materials and has a LaB6 filament. This microscope requires thin specimens (usually less than 100 nm) and has a point resolution of 0.23 nm. Besides imaging and selected-area electron diffraction, it also has operating modes for spot analysis (down to 0.5 nm) of elemental composition by x-ray energy analysis, convergent beam electron diffraction, nanobeam (down to 0.5 nm) electron diffraction, and hollow-cone electron diffraction. Imaging is done digitally with an AMT XR80 bottom mount camera. Using the attached Thermo Scientific x-ray detector, quantitative analysis of thin specimens can be done. Finally, in phase contrast mode, imaging of lattice planes of crystalline materials can be done. Both single-tilt and double-tilt holders are available.

JEOL 100CX II Transmission Electron Microscope
JEOL 100CX II Transmission Electron Microscope

This microscope is optimized for soft materials – biological samples, organic and polymer films. It operates between 20 and 100 kV and has a point resolution of 0.3 nm, using a tungsten filament. Specimen thickness can be up to about 200 nm with this microscope. It has the usual operating modes of imaging and selected-area electron diffraction. A variety of specimen holders are available – single-tilt, double-tilt, low temperature, and high temperature.

Tescan Mira3 Scanning Electron Microscope
Tescan Mira3 Scanning Electron Microscope

This new microscope was installed in late 2015. It uses a field-emission electron gun to achieve 2-nm resolution at 30 kV. The chamber can accommodate specimens with a maximum diameter of 100 mm and about 30-mm thick.  It operates between 0.5 and 30 kV, and has beam deceleration technology to enhance resolution at low operating voltages. Magnification is continuously variable up to 1 million. The microscope is fully digitally controlled for easy and dependable performance. It has both secondary and back-scattered electron detectors. Attached to the microscope is a Bruker energy dispersive spectrometer. This allows for compositional analysis in field-of-view, spot or small area, linescan, and mapping modes. Using the latter mode, the user can determine the spatial distributions of the elements in the sample. Quantify options are available in all modes for the quantification of elements present.

Zeiss Supra 40 VP Scanning Electron Microscope
Zeiss Supra 40 VP Scanning Electron Microscope

This microscope uses a field-emission electron gun and operates between 1 and 30 kV. Specimens of maximum diameter of 100 mm and up to 45-mm thick can be used. The SEM has a variable-pressure (VP) mode which allows non-conductive samples to be imaged without additional conductive coating. There are five detectors available: secondary electron, in-lens secondary electron, VP, backscattered electron, and STEM for imaging transmitted electrons.

Specimen Preparation
Specimen Preparation

A Leica Ultracut E ultramicrotome is available to prepare thin specimens for TEM imaging and analysis. An Allied High Technology polisher is also available for preparing embedded specimens for SEM imaging and analysis.