Heidi Nickisher Headshot

Heidi Nickisher

Principal Lecturer

School of Art
College of Art and Design

585-475-4996
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
7A-3412

Heidi Nickisher

Principal Lecturer

School of Art
College of Art and Design

Education

BA, University of California at Santa Barbara; MA, California State University, Fullerton; Ph.D., University of Buffalo

585-475-4996

Areas of Expertise

Select Scholarship

Invited Keynote/Presentation
Nickisher, Heidi C. "18th C. Saxon Consorts and their Personal Relationships with Porcelain Manufactories in Europe." Annual Conference. College Art Association. Chicago, IL. 15 Feb. 2020. Conference Presentation.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "Fretting the Popular: A Design Story." Popular Culture/American Culture Association 2018 National Conference. PCA/ACA. Indianapolis, IN. 31 Mar. 2018. Conference Presentation.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "The Passion for Porcelain." New York Conference on Asian Studies (NYCAS): Innovation and Invention. NYCAS. Rochester, NY. 21 Sep. 2018. Conference Presentation.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "Capodimonte: Out of the Ruins and Into the Fire." Popular Culture/American Culture Association 2017 National Conference. PCA/ACA. San Diego, CA. 15 Apr. 2017. Conference Presentation.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "Maria Amalia and the Capodimonte Porcelain Manufactory." Viva l'Italia! Viva l'Italia Concert and Lecture Series, College of Liberal Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology. Rochester, NY. 24 Mar. 2017. Guest Lecture.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "The Visual Culture of Global Trade: Interactions with Asia and the Pacific." Popular Culture/American Culture Association 2016 National Conference. PCA/ACA. Seattle, WA. 22 Mar. 2016. Conference Presentation.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "Italian Ceramics in Cultural Perspective." Viva l'Italia! Viva l'Italia Concert and Lecture Series, College of Liberal Arts, Rochester Institute of Technology. Rochester, NY. 17 Mar. 2016. Guest Lecture.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "Spinning Old Yarn Into New Tales." Popular Culture/America Culture Association 2015 National Conference. PCA/ACA. New Orleans, LA. 2 Apr. 2015. Conference Presentation.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "The Other Tea Party: Material Desire and the Materiality of Identity." Popular Culture/American Culture Association 2012 National Conference. PCA/ACA. Boston, MA. 14 Apr. 2012. Conference Presentation.
Nickisher, Heidi C. "Tomato Tomahto, Disegno Design: Sixteenth-Century Italian Maiolica." Popular Culture/American Culture Association 2011 National Conference. PCA/ACA. San Antonio, TX. 22 Apr. 2011. Conference Presentation.

Currently Teaching

ARTH-135
3 Credits
In this course students will examine the forms, styles, functions, and meanings of important objects and monuments dating from prehistory through the Middle Ages, and consider these works of art in their social, historical and cultural contexts. The primary goals of this course are to learn how to look, how to describe and analyze what we see, and how to use these skills to understand and explain how art visually expresses meaning. At the end of the term, students will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of the discipline of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
ARTH-366
3 Credits
This course will examine Western art in the period leading up to the French Revolution and the early “Modern” period – generally, the mid-19th century. This process will include a close examination of the works and careers of individual artists who have been considered some of the best-known representatives of the most significant art movements of the era, such as Rococo, Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism. Students will learn a new vocabulary for discussing visual representations and will situate issues within political, religious, literary, and historical contexts. Throughout the course, a series of questions about art will be presented and students will assess how the nature of those questions affects the way they see images.
ARTH-136
3 Credits
In this course students will examine the forms, styles, functions, and meanings of important objects and monuments dating from the European Renaissance through the beginning of the twentieth century, and consider these works of art in their social, historical and cultural contexts. The primary goals of this course are to learn how to look and how to describe and analyze what we see, and to use these skills to understand and explain how art visually expresses meaning. At the end of the term, students will have gained a foundational knowledge of the object, scope and methods of the discipline of art history. The knowledge obtained in this introductory course will also guide students in their own creative endeavors.
ARTH-572
3 Credits
This is a survey course of native north and South American visual arts within an historical and anthropological framework. Included will be an examination of the development of principal styles of Ancient American architecture, sculpture, painting, and ceramics up to the 16th century when the Spanish conquistadors defeated the Aztec and Inca empires and imposed colonial rule. Consideration is also given to materials used, techniques of construction, individual and tribal styles, as well as to the meaning and function of various art forms within Native American societies.
ARTH-672
3 Credits
This is a survey course of native north and South American visual arts within an historical and anthropological framework. Included will be an examination of the development of principal styles of Ancient American architecture, sculpture, painting, and ceramics up to the sixteenth century when the Spanish conquistadores defeated the Aztec and Inca empires and imposed colonial rule. Consideration is also given to materials used, techniques of construction, individual and tribal styles, as well as to the meaning and function of various art forms within Native American societies.