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Tiger Talks Faculty Showcase

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

We are excited to bring you this year’s Tiger Talks Faculty Showcase during Destination Intersession on Wednesday, January 14, 2015!

Registration for the 2015 Tiger Talks Faculty Showcase is now open! Use printable Showcase Schedule PDF form to select the presentations you would like to attend, and register online.

8:30 – 9:00 a.m.

Continental Breakfast
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), 2230-2220 Hallway


9:00 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions

A Garden of One’s Own: Nurturing Pedagogical Practice Outside of the University Classroom
Carole Woodlock, CIAS
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2240

Abstract
For the past several years, the understanding of artistic processes and creativity has been central to my teaching and research practice. In the fall of 2013 while working on some new curriculum ideas, I distracted myself by deciding that I would embark on an adventure of becoming a gardener. This presentation shares the journey I took this past year in planning, creating, and observing my first ever garden. As fall took its hold on the grounds of my first creations, I realized that the experience of gardening parallels my pedagogical interests, and in fact has helped me to generate new ideas and innovate new approaches. My diversion, it turns out, was energizing and nurturing to my teaching and research practice.

Mad Scholar at #madstudies: Working at the Intersection of Mental Health, Professional Scholarship and Social Movements
Lisa Hermsen, CLA
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2230

Abstract
The term “high-knowledge crazies” was coined by David Reville (Ryerson University) to describe those who have used their academic credentials to speak publicly about their diagnostic label, adding formal knowledge to their first-hand understanding about life with mental illness. Geoffrey Reaume, now at York University after earning his PhD, developed one of the first courses in the History of Madness––after he was diagnosed at 14 with paranoid schizophrenia, twice admitted to psychiatric facilities, and dropped out of high school. The new "mad studies," encourage us to make explicit connections from "madhouses" to ongoing problems of stigma and discrimination, [un]employment, human rights violations, and [de]institutionalization. As someone who would like to identify as a "high-knowledge crazy," I will discuss my approach to my own "History of Madness" course and give an overview of the teaching practices I use to bring "mad studies" into a traditional classroom.

Take Me To The River: Rowing, Racing, Middle Age, Love, Friendship and Rock & Roll
Elizabeth Perry, CHST
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2220

Abstract
A follow up talk to last year’s Showcase presentation on returning to a favorite sport—this presentation goes on to describe the fun, triumphs and utter failures of a first season/year of serious competitive Masters racing across the United States and Canada. Beginning with the purchase of a high tech single racing shell in April 2014 (christened as “Wing” from a favorite Patti Smith song), this is a story of one person’s response to life, aging, and a life-long love affair with water and motion—and presents an alternative model of “work/love/life balance” at 50. It will (hopefully!) include some live-action footage and will draw heavily from clichéd Rock & Roll lyrics from 1960 to present.

10:00 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions

Frank Netter and Me: Following in the Footsteps of the World's Greatest Medical Illustrator
Jim Perkins, CHST
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2240

Abstract

Ask any healthcare professional to name a medical illustrator and they’ll say “Frank Netter.” Already a successful artist in the 1920s, Netter heeded his mother’s wish to “get a real job” and studied medicine at NYU. Graduating during the Great Depression, he found he could make a better living illustrating the human body than treating it. In the 1930s he began a relationship with CIBA Pharmaceuticals that lasted the rest of his life. Hailed by many as the greatest medical illustrator of the 20th century, Netter’s legacy lives on long past his death.

For the past 13 years I have been part of a team of medical illustrators who carry on the Netter tradition. This presentation will discuss Dr. Netter’s life and his approach to illustrating medicine, my own artwork and the challenge of integrating it with the “Netter” style.


Fat Stem Cells: The Future of Tissue Engineering?
Tom Gaborski, KGCOE
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2230

Abstract
The goal of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is to repair or replace tissues and organs that were damaged as a result of injury or disease. This requires the precise use of many types of cells, support scaffolds and biochemical factors to create replacement tissue. It is important to design these structures with the proper mechanical and physiological requirements in mind. One of the major challenges in creating replacement organs is producing a functional vascular network within the engineered tissue. This network is needed to bring blood, oxygen and nutrients from the patient’s circulatory system into the new tissue. Our laboratory is looking at ways to use adult stem cells to create and nurture these engineered vascular networks. We are using nanomembranes to create microenvironments that help support and differentiate stem cells. The cells we use are adipose-derived stem cells that come from fat tissue. Creating engineered tissues from one’s own stem cells not only helps address the critical shortage of donor organs, but also potentially solves many aspects of organ rejection by the immune system. We hope to create the toolbox and methodologies that will enable future tissue engineers to create blood vessels for a variety of replacement organs from anyone’s own fat tissue.

Turning Evil Into Good
Clyde Eiríkur Hull, SCB
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2220

Abstract
If corporations are evil, can they still do good? Can they, in fact, become good? How would this work? Based on research conducted over the last decade with Saunders College of Business Professors Stephen Luxmore and Zhi Tang and with RIT’s Chair of Public Policy, Dr. Sandra Rothenberg, I will present empirical data to address the question of good and evil in the corporation. The audience should take away an understanding of what makes corporations be good (and evil), and of how companies can be turned from evil to good.

11:00 a.m.

Concurrent Sessions

Bridging the Creative-Critical Divide through Collaborative Worldbuilding
Trent Hergenrader, CLA
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2240

Abstract
In this presentation I will discuss how research in creative writing studies, digital pedagogy, and game-based learning has developed into an extended classroom exercise called “critical worldbuilding,” where students co-create a sprawling fictional world through an ongoing process of discussion, debate and collaborative writing. This shared world becomes the backdrop for students’ short fiction, where their characters must contend with the various economic, political, and cultural forces at play in their daily lives. This methodology requires students to think critically about how societies operate, both in fictional worlds as well as our own, while allowing them to express themselves creatively through writing. Though originally designed to teach aspects of fiction, this flexible methodology can be modified to suit a number of other disciplines seeking to blend critical thinking with creative production.

Mixing it up! Sustainability, Engineering and Design
Callie Babbitt, GIS / Alex Lobos, CIAS
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2230

Abstract
This hands-on session discusses strategies used in a cross-disciplinary studio developed and offered as a collaboration between Sustainability and Industrial Design at RIT. Most of the session will have participants exploring how people develop emotional attachment to products; unraveling the complexity of electronic products; and brainstorming strategies for creating sustainable consumer electronic products. This will serve as a case study to illustrate the need for multiple disciplinary perspectives to solve sustainability challenges. Participants are asked to bring in broken or unused small electronics to investigate during the activity. The session will also provide useful tips and ideas for setting up inter-disciplinary collaborations and share exciting student projects that have come out of this popular course.

The Role of Discipline-based Education Research in Promoting Diversity in STEM
Geraldine Cochran, Multicultural Center for Academic Success
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2220

Abstract
Recent results in discipline-based education research (DBER) have advanced our understanding of how to promote gender and ethnic diversity in STEM fields. This has included investigating the role of self-efficacy and identity, the impact of community building and classroom dynamics, and the effectiveness of classroom interventions. Research design in these areas has relied on a variety of methodologies and novel statistical applications. Implications of this research reach all levels of education and can be beneficial to both faculty and administrators. In this presentation I will discuss some of the findings within physics education research and the larger field of DBER that I have found beneficial to understanding how to support underrepresented students both inside and outside of the classroom, as well as how to assess these initiatives. I will also discuss my current collaborations with faculty at RIT and other institutions and my hopes for future collaboration with RIT faculty.

Noon-12:45 p.m.

Join your colleagues for lunch!
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2210


1:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions

Zen Tao Color
Mark Fairchild, COS
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2240

Abstract
Color Science is one of RIT’s seven Ph.D. programs (with graduate studies dating back to the 1980s and research to the 1960s) and there is even a Color Science Hall, literally a hall, on campus. Yet the program remains, to paraphrase Churchill, a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma. This presentation aims to give a light-hearted and visually interesting introduction to some fundamental concepts of color science and our mathematical description of what we see (my career). This journey will follow a path that draws parallels between our quest to scientifically study our perception of color and the sometimes equally mysterious principles of zen (thoughtful introspection and meditation) and tao (the way of nature), which represent one of my more personal interests. As Thoreau wrote, “How much of beauty—of color, as well as form—on which our eyes daily rest goes unperceived by us?”

Mobilizing America: World War I Posters and the Construction of American Identity
Tina Olsin Lent, CLS
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2230

Abstract
As part of the international World War I centennial that began this year, RIT’s University Gallery held an exhibition of vintage American war posters from the collection of the Rochester Historical Society titled, “Mobilizing America: Fighting WWI on the Homefront and the Battlefront.” Developed from the exhibition, this talk focuses on (a) how the posters became a part of Woodrow Wilson’s successful campaign to forge unified national support for America’s entry into the war, (b) how the posters tapped into pre-existing advertising imagery, and (c) how they reworked the depiction of gender in those images to reconcile a crisis in American gender identity while constructing a new national identity. Particular attention will be paid to the work of commercial illustrators Howard Chandler Christy, J.C. Leyendecker and James Montgomery Flagg, whose work dominated contemporary popular media, but are best known today for the iconic posters they produced between 1917 and 1918.

Thinking about Thinking: Metacognition and Modern Teaching
Kirsten Condry, CLA
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2220

Abstract
How much students understand about their own skills in studying and learning can greatly influence their motivation and success, but students vary widely in their ability to accurately assess themselves. The goal of this workshop is to discuss how to enhance “thinking about learning” among students by explicitly focusing on their metacognition in the teaching of courses. Two techniques will be presented for improving students’ metacognitive awareness using in-class exercises and assignments. The techniques focus on exam taking skills (with the use of an “exam wrapper”) and writing assignments (with the use of “peer review”). For each technique we will discuss how and why to employ it, when it is useful, and what benefits to expect for faculty and students. Participants will take home examples of each technique for possible adaptation to their own courses.

2:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions

Accessible Presentations for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students
Raja Kushalnagar, NTID
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2240

Abstract
Deaf, hard-of-hearing and low vision students often encounter “visual noise” such as large viewing distances, line of sight interference or obstruction, or poor lighting or viewing angles. This visual noise in the classroom can significantly interfere with the visual perception and learning process for these students. I will illustrate how each factor impacts visual learning, and demonstrate steps to mitigate these factors.

Three Thousand Pounds of Impression: A Printing Press in Scholarly Inquiry
Steven Galbraith and Amelia Hugill-Fontanel, TWC
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2230

Abstract

The Cary Graphic Arts Collection has been growing dynamically over 45 years at RIT, acquiring rare books and artifacts about the history of printing, design, and the book arts. These items are used daily for teaching and research in our community and by scholars from afar. The Cary’s most recent major acquisition of a celebrated nineteenth-century iron printing press owned by William Morris and other printing luminaries has created unique opportunities for interdisciplinary instruction and scholarship. Join Cary curators to hear how this analog machine remains surprisingly relevant.


There and Back Again: More than Creating Sculpture in China
Elizabeth Kronfield, CIAS
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2220

Abstract
During the summer of 2014, I received a grant to travel to Jingdezhen, China, to participate in an Artist Residency program at San Bao Ceramics Art Institute. While in China, I was exposed to new materials, processes, techniques, artists and culture. All of these things I fully expected to influence my work; however, I did not expect how those influences would tie back into the artwork I have been producing the past 15 years. I will share my experiences, a glimpse into my creative process, concepts, and the collaborations with Jingdezhen master craftsmen and industry.

3:00 p.m.

Concurrent Sessions

Creation and Collaboration in Concert
Grant Cos, CLA / Babak Elahi, CLA
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2240

Abstract
Academic collaboration can be fed and nurtured by collaborative efforts in non-academic settings. Social, avocational, and personal collaboration attunes colleagues to each other's rhythms of work and cadence of thought. In fact, these musical metaphors are particularly apropos of our subject. As a musical duo, we have found that the process of listening to each other, of improvising based on that listening, and of fine-tuning a song that we play and sing together can translate into a good collaborative relationship in our scholarly work. As colleagues who have taught together and published together, our musical collaboration has deepened our academic partnership. We believe that this sort of personal teamwork can sustain our academic, scholarly, and professional work.

The ICE FOLEYS!: Passion, Profession, Animation and a Wellness Course
Dave Sluberski, CIAS
Location: Gannett Hall/GAN07B, Room A070

Abstract
Fellow faculty member Brian Larson, an animator, came to me for help with sound in a short animation entitled “Life Lines” of a figurine with pencil legs creating lines on a canvas. He had used some pencil sounds as a scratch track. My first impression was that of an Ice Follies dancer. I’ve been ice skating at RIT for the past two years as part of a wellness course, so I experimented with some innovative microphone techniques to create Foley sounds (the reproduction of everyday sound effects that are added to film, video, and other media in post-production to enhance audio quality), and secured use of the Frank Ritter Ice Arena, with the support of the Ritter staff. What resulted from this collaboration is a unique celebration of the animation and sound design arts. Can you tell the difference between the sounds of a pencil and the ice skates? Can you hear the difference “between the lines”?

Non-tasters vs. Super-tasters: The Chemistry and Biology of Your Favorite Foods!
Sandi Connelly, COS / Jeff Mills, COS
Location:  Louise Slaughter Hall/SL 078 (CIMS), Room 2220

Abstract

Where: Your kitchen.
Who: You, in your favorite apron.

What: Your taste buds don’t wear capes – but they are super heroes! How do they help you create the “perfect dish” for a fancy dinner party or a lazy Sunday morning breakfast in bed? The answer isn’t as simple as you might think. Start with three parts chemistry, stir in two parts biology, sprinkle with a dash of memories, and serve on Grandma’s hand-me-down plates! Only then can you create the “perfect dish”!

How and Why: Let’s explore how chemistry and biology meld to form the world of taste. All tasters are invited to join us as we explore what you like, what you don’t, and why! We will conduct some simple experiments that you can repeat at home and give you hints for how to get the most out of your next “perfect dish”!


Questions: Anne.Marie.Canale@rit.edu or Cheryl.Herdklotz@rit.edu