Tamas Wiandt Headshot

Tamas Wiandt

Professor

School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Undergraduate Program Coordinator

585-475-5767
Office Hours
2221: MWF 2-2:50pm
Office Location

Tamas Wiandt

Professor

School of Mathematical Sciences
College of Science
Undergraduate Program Coordinator

Education

BS, Jozsef Attila University (Hungary); Ph.D., University of Minnesota

585-475-5767

Areas of Expertise

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Barbosu, M. and T. Wiandt. "On a New Inequality in the Planar Three-body Problem." Astrophysics and Space Science 361. 6 (2016): 1-5. Print.
Wiandt, T. "Intensity of Attractors for Closed Relations on Compact Hausdorff Spaces." International Journal of Difference Equations 11. 2 (2016): 215-223. Print.

Currently Teaching

MATH-108
3 Credits
This course introduces a rich variety of geometry topics beyond those studied at the high school level. Each topic is augmented with connections to the arts, sciences, engineering, and other everyday applications. Course activities will emphasize problem solving in geometry and communicating mathematical arguments in the context of geometry. Geometric concepts will be explored using technology as well.
MATH-181
4 Credits
This is the first in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers functions, limits, continuity, the derivative, rules of differentiation, applications of the derivative, Riemann sums, definite integrals, and indefinite integrals.
MATH-182
4 Credits
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. It emphasizes the understanding of concepts, and using them to solve physical problems. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
MATH-182A
4 Credits
This is the second in a two-course sequence intended for students majoring in mathematics, science, or engineering. The course includes the same topics as MATH-182, but the focus of the workshop component is different. Whereas workshops attached to 182 emphasize concept development and real-world applications, the workshops of MATH-182A emphasize skill development and provide just-in-time review of precalculus material as needed. The course covers techniques of integration including integration by parts, partial fractions, improper integrals, applications of integration, representing functions by infinite series, convergence and divergence of series, parametric curves, and polar coordinates.
MATH-189
1 - 3 Credits
This is a course suitable for first-year students that covers topics not currently offered in the curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures.
MATH-219
3 Credits
This course is principally a study of the calculus of functions of two or more variables, but also includes the study of vectors, vector-valued functions and their derivatives. The course covers limits, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and includes applications in physics. Credit cannot be granted for both this course and MATH-221.
MATH-251
3 Credits
This course introduces sample spaces and events, axioms of probability, counting techniques, conditional probability and independence, distributions of discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions (discrete and continuous), the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimation, and applications of probability and statistics to real-world problems. A statistical package such as Minitab or R is used for data analysis and statistical applications.
MATH-261
3 Credits
This course examines concepts in finance from a mathematical viewpoint. It includes topics such as the Black-Scholes model, financial derivatives, the binomial model, and an introduction to stochastic calculus. Although the course is mathematical in nature, only a background in calculus (including Taylor series) and basic probability is assumed; other mathematical concepts and numerical methods are introduced as needed.
MATH-295
3 Credits
This course develops strategies for solving problems that are chosen from a wide variety of areas in mathematics. Students present solutions to the class or instructor.
MATH-326
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to boundary value problems. Topics include Fourier series, separation of variables, Laplace's equation, the heat equation, and the wave equation in Cartesian and polar coordinate systems.
MATH-341
3 Credits
This is a second course in linear algebra that provides an in-depth study of fundamental concepts of the subject. It focuses largely on the effect that a choice of basis has on our understanding of and ability to solve problems with linear operators. Topics include linear transformations, similarity, inner products and orthogonality, QR factorization, singular value decomposition, and the Spectral Theorem. The course includes both computational techniques and the further development of mathematical reasoning skills.
MATH-381
3 Credits
This course covers the algebra of complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy's integral theorem and integral formulas, Taylor and Laurent series, residues, and the calculation of real-valued integrals by complex-variable methods.
MATH-495
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed project that could be considered original in nature. The level of work is appropriate for students in their final two years of undergraduate study.
MATH-498
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-guided investigation into appropriate topics that are not part of the curriculum.
MATH-499
0 Credits
This course is a cooperative education experience for undergraduate students majoring in Applied Mathematics, Computational Mathematics or Statistics.
MATH-501
0 Credits
The experiential learning requirement in the Applied Mathematics and Computational Mathematics programs can be accomplished in various ways. This course exists to record the completion of experiential learning activities that have been pre-approved by the School of Mathematical Sciences. Such pre-approval is considered on a case-by-case basis.
MATH-731
3 Credits
This course covers an analysis of iterations of maps, symbolic dynamics, their uses, and fractals. It includes methods for simplifying dynamical systems (center manifolds and normal forms), Melnikov's method, and applications.