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Time Commitment

One of the most commonly asked questions we receive from EMBA prospects concerns the workload involved in our EMBA program.  This isn’t surprising given that most EMBA students are juggling full-time jobs, families, and other commitments.  

This is a legitimate concern.  We offer a comprehensive curriculum in a shorter-than-normal MBA timeframe.   As a result, RIT’s Executive MBA program is rigorous and challenging.  While the pace is fast, students quickly hone their time management and collaboration skills as they move through the program.

On average, students can expect to work approximately 20 hours per week outside of class.  Because nearly all courses involve a team deliverable, at least some of that time is spent collaborating each week with your team.  

    We understand that students can’t put their lives on hold while going through the program, and that competing demands can be stressful at times.   As we like to say, “You can have a bad week at work, a bad week at school, or a bad week at home… but try not to have those all in the same week.”  Needless to say, all students will occasionally experience that week.  This is when your team relationships really prove themselves. 

    Yes, RIT’s Executive MBA requires a real commitment, but like anything of real value, the reward is commensurate with the commitment.

    Students find the schedule that best fits their particular situation.  See how some of our students manage their workload:

    “I spent all day Sunday (8-10 hours) getting ahead and then I put in 1-2 hours per night (after the kids went to bed).  This schedule worked very well for me and meant the minimum impact on family and work.  It offered the additional benefit of a good night’s sleep, because I was usually ahead on the work.”

    “I went into the office early every day.  I would get in three hours of work from 6:00 – 9:00 am.  The office was quiet and with few distractions (TV, family).  I would then add a little work when necessary in the evenings or on the weekends.”