Bob Carter Headshot

Bob Carter

Senior Lecturer

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-7098
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
76 Lomb Memorial Dr., bldg 17, rm 2507

Bob Carter

Senior Lecturer

Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, University of Maine; Ph.D., Cornell University

Bio

Dr. Robert Carter received his B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Maine and his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Cornell University. Following a two-year Post Doc at the University of Liverpool (UK), he worked for five years developing advanced catalytic reactor technology for gas turbine and automotive engine applications at Precision Combustion, Inc., a small R & D firm in Connecticut. While there, he also founded and managed the catalyst development group. He then worked at General Motors’ Fuel Cell Activities for 13 years where he developed technology in a wide range of areas including: hydrogen production from gasoline and natural gas, two-phase flow and liquid water management, spatially resolved membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) diagnostics, and fuel cell stack durability. Dr. Carter joined RIT early in 2013 and has been conducting research focused on electrokinetics and heterogeneous catalysis applications of inorganic nanomembranes. He is interested in applying fundamental principles and tools of materials science, transport phenomena, and chemical kinetics to develop new classes of catalytic membrane reactors and nanoparticle separators. Over his career, Dr. Carter has authored over 30 publications, given 20 conference presentations and invited talks, and holds several patents.

Selected Publications:

  • J.J. Miller, R.N. Carter, K.B. McNabb, J.D. Winans, J.-P.S. DesOrmeaux, C.C. Streimer, J.L. McGrath, and T.R. Gaborski, “Lift-off of Large-scale Ultrathin Nanomembranes,” Adv. Mater. (in review, 2014).
  • Z. Yu and R.N. Carter, “Measurement of Effective Oxygen Diffusivity in Electrodes for PEM Fuel Cells,” J. Power Sources, 195 (2010) 1079-1084.
  • W. Gu, P.T. Yu, R.N. Carter, R. Makharia, and H.A. Gasteiger, “Modeling of Membrane-Electrode Assembly Degradation in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells – Start-Stop and Local-H2-Starvation-Induced Carbon Support Corrosion,” in Modern Aspects of Electrochemistry: Modeling and Diagnostics of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells, Vol 49, U. Pasaogullari and C.-Y. Wang (eds.), Springer, New York, Chapter 2, pp 45-87, (2010).
  • R.N. Carter, W. Gu, B. Brady, K. Subramanian, and H.A. Gasteiger, “MEA Degradation Mechanisms Studies by Current Distribution Measurements,” in Handbook of Fuel Cells –Advances in Electrocatalysts, Materials, Diagnostics and Durability, Volumes 5 & 6, W. Vielstich, H. A. Gasteiger and H. Yokokawa (eds.), John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, Chapter 56 , pp 829-843 (2009).
  • B. Gao, T.S. Steenhuis, Y. Zevi, J.-Y. Parlange, R.N. Carter, and T.A. Trabold, “Visualization of Unstable Water Flow in a Fuel Cell Gas Diffusion Layer,” J. Power Sources, 190 (2009) 493.
  • Z.Y. Liu, B.K. Brady, R.N. Carter, B. Litteer, and M. Budinski, “Characterization of Carbon Corrosion-Induced Structural Damage of PEM Fuel Cell Cathode Electrodes,” J. Electrochem. Soc., 155 (2008) B979.
585-475-7098

Currently Teaching

EGEN-231
1 Credits
The second course in a series of three courses for engineering honors students focused on how innovative products are developed, designed and manufactured to effectively meet the expanding needs of a global economy. This course highlights key issues that decision-makers in industry need to understand as they shape their companies to be more competitive in a global context. Specific topics in the course include an in-depth discussion of the manufacturing supply chain and how active management of the supply chain can enhance profitability and customer satisfaction. Additionally, the course addresses issues such as the the impact of government policies and monetary issues on globalization and outsourcing.
MECE-102
3 Credits
This course examines classical Newtonian mechanics from a calculus-based fundamental perspective with close coupling to integrated laboratory experiences. Topics include kinematics; Newton's laws of motion; work-energy theorem, and power; systems of particles and linear momentum; circular motion and rotation; mechanical waves, and oscillations and gravitation within the context of mechanical engineering, using mechanical engineering conventions and nomenclature. Each topic is reviewed in lecture, and then thoroughly studied in an accompanying laboratory session. Students conduct experiments using modern data acquisition technology; and analyze, interpret, and present the results using modern computer software.
MECE-211
2 Credits
This course is focused on developing skills and knowledge in the areas of instrumentation, computer data acquisition (DAQ), measurement theory, uncertainty analysis, data analysis, and technical report writing. Specific topics that are covered include: • Physical dimension variability assessment • Centrifugal pump performance evaluation • Temperature, pressure, and flow instrumentation and measurements • LabVIEW programming and DAQ hardware application • Transient measurements including computer data acquisition • Digital signal input and output Each topic includes background theoretical content with some individual exercises and then a team-based lab with accompanying lab report. Reports are submitted first in draft form and are reviewed by peers in class before preparing them for final draft submission
MECE-305
3 Credits
This course provides the student with an overview of structure, properties, and processing of metals, polymers, and ceramics. Relevant basic manufacturing processes and materials selection is also discussed. There is a particular emphasis on steels, but significant attention is given to non-ferrous metals, ceramics, and polymers
MECE-550
3 Credits
The transportation sector represents nominally a third of the total energy consumption in the US, and presently, over 90% of this comes from petroleum sources. Transportation is responsible for about a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions and is a major source for several criteria pollutants. This course will introduce students to engineering practices used to evaluate transportation technologies from the standpoint of sustainability with an emphasis on light duty vehicles. Several emerging technologies including battery and hybrid electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, and bio-fuels will be considered. Particular attention will be devoted to the energy efficiency and emissions of the technology at the both vehicle and the fuel source levels. Additionally, the economic and social impacts will be examined. No text book will be assigned, and instead we will rely on open-access publications, journal articles, and electronic text available through the library. Approved as applied elective for the Energy & Environment Option and for the Automotive Option.
MECE-650
3 Credits
The transportation sector represents nominally a third of the total energy consumption in the US, and presently, over 90% of this comes from petroleum sources. Transportation is responsible for about a quarter of greenhouse gas emissions and is a major source for several criteria pollutants. This course will introduce students to engineering practices used to evaluate transportation technologies from the standpoint of sustainability with an emphasis on light duty vehicles. Several emerging technologies including battery and hybrid electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, and bio-fuels will be considered. Particular attention will be devoted to the energy efficiency and emissions of the technology at the both vehicle and the fuel source levels. Additionally, the economic and social impacts will be examined. No text book will be assigned, and instead we will rely on open-access publications, journal articles, and electronic text available through the library.