Andrew Perry Headshot

Andrew Perry

Senior Lecturer

University Writing Program
Academic Affairs

585-475-6945
Office Location

Andrew Perry

Senior Lecturer

University Writing Program
Academic Affairs

Education

BA, State University College at Oswego; MA, State University College at Brockport

Bio

Bio data: Andrew Perry is a Senior Lecturer in the University Writing Program at Rochester Institute of Technology where he is actively engaged in research and scholarship in the fields of Comics Studies, Visual Literacy, and Multimodal approaches to Composition.

His recent publications include “Encrumbed by the Signifying Monkey: Con Men, Cackling Clowns and the Exigencies of Desire in the Comics of Robert Crumb.”

He has also written a children’s middle grade novel entitled Gargle the Goose which was profiled in the Reporter article, “Outside of the Classroom.” 

He has given multiple lectures on Comics Studies, including a Rochester TEDx Talk on visual literacy entitled, “Reinventions: Visual Literacy and Graphic Narratives” in 2011  and a featured lecture at the Toronto Comics Arts Festival (TCAF) in 2012.

585-475-6945

Personal Links

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Perry, Andrew. "Encrumbed by the Signifying Monkey: Con Men, Cackling Clowns and the Exigencies of Desire in the Comics of Robert Crumb." International Journal of Comic Art 21. 2 (2019): 4-46. Print.

Currently Teaching

SOIS-344
3 Credits
This course focuses on a popular genre in the comics medium. The history of the genre is explored as it developed in cartooning and comics, as well as in related media such as animation, film, games, prose, television, and toys. Genres may include Comedy, Crime, Fantasy, Funny Animals, Horror, Mystery, Romance, Science Fiction, Superhero, or Western. Check course schedule for the specific topic during any semester.
UWRT-150
3 Credits
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.