Nathan Eddingsaas Headshot

Nathan Eddingsaas

Associate Professor

School of Chemistry and Materials Science
College of Science
Director of Chemistry MS Program

585-475-4605
Office Location

Nathan Eddingsaas

Associate Professor

School of Chemistry and Materials Science
College of Science
Director of Chemistry MS Program

Education

B.Sc., University of Wisconsin, Stevens Point; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

585-475-4605

Personal Links
Areas of Expertise

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Eddingsaas, Nathan, et al. "Qualitative Analysis of E-Liquid Emissions as a Function of Flavor Additives Using Two Aerosol Capture Methods." International Journal of Environmental Research and Publick Health 15. (2018): 323. Print.
Robinson, Risa J., et al. "A Framework to Investigate the Impact of Topography and Product Characteristics on Electronic Cigarette Emissions." PLOS One 13. 11 (2018): e0206341. Web.
Suslick, Kenneth S, et al. "The Chemical History of a Bubble." Accounts of Chemical Research 51. 9 (2018): 2169-2178. Print.
Eddingsaas, Nathan C., et al. "Variation in pH of Model Secondary Organic Aerosol during Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation." Journal of Physical Chemistry A. (2016): 1-9. Web.
Eddingsaas, Nathan C., et al. "Variation in pH of Model Secondary Organic Aerosol during Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation." Journal of Physical Chemistry A 120. 18 (2016): 2868--2876. Print.
Dodson, Leah G., et al. "VUV Photoionization Cross Sections of HO2, H2O2, and H2CO." Journal of Physical Chemistry A. (2014): Accepted. Print.
Peer Reviewed/Juried Poster Presentation
Wilcop, Mary, Jonathan Thornton, and Nathan Eddingsaas. "Cosmetics as Artifacts: The Analysis and Conservation of a 1930s Theatrical Makeup Kit." Proceedings of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works 46th Annual Meeting. Ed. American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works. Houston, Texas: n.p..
Book Chapter
Eddingsaas, Nathan C. "Mechanoluminescence Induced by Acoustic Cavitation." Triboluminescence - Theory, Synthesis, and Applications. Ed. David O. Olawale. : Springer, 2016. 1-454. Web.
Eddingsaas, Nathan C. "Mechanoluminescence Induced by Acoustic Cavitation." Triboluminescence - Theory, Synthesis, and Applications. Ed. David O. Olawale. : Springer, 2016. 237--271. Print.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Eddingsaas, Nathan C. "Acidic Atmospheric Aerosols: Chemical Composition and Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation." Seminar. Department of Chemistry, SUNY ESF. Syracuse, NY. 12 Sep. 2014. Guest Lecture.
Eddingsaas, Nathan C. "Formation of Low Vapor Pressure Compounds in Atmospheric Aerosols: Mechanism of Organosulfate Formation." 245th ACS National Meeting. American Chemical Society. New Orleans, LA. 7 Apr. 2013. Conference Presentation.

Currently Teaching

CHEM-493
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research in chemistry that could be considered of an original nature.
CHEM-495
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
CHEM-790
1 - 6 Credits
Dissertation research by the candidate for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
CHEM-772
1 Credits
Chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar II is the second in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires the students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries.
CHEM-774
1 Credits
Professional chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar IV is the fourth in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires the students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries. Additionally, each student will present a seminar summarizing their thesis research at RIT which serves as the public portion of their thesis defense.
CHMA-711
3 Credits
The theory, applications, and limitations of selected instrumental methods in qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis will be discussed. This course is also intended to give an opportunity to develop writing and revising abilities, as well as communication skills. Library, literature, and textbook research will be required.
CHEM-780
1 - 4 Credits
Chemistry project accomplished by the MS student for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the project advisor.
CHEM-771
1 Credits
Chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar I is the first in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires the students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries. Additionally, each student will present a seminar on their proposed research that also summarizes the scientific literature related to the research.
CHEM-773
1 Credits
Chemists are required to communicate information about their research, laboratory, and themselves orally. Graduate Chemistry Seminar III is the third in a series of four courses designed to develop the ability to assimilate useful information and organize a chemistry seminar while increasing a student's breadth and depth of knowledge of chemical research topics. This seminar requires students to attend weekly chemistry seminars and write seminar summaries throughout the four semesters. Additionally, each student must invite, organize, host, and introduce an external seminar speaker to participate in the Chemistry Seminar Series.
ENVS-670
3 Credits
This course will build on previous chemistry courses to expand knowledge of biogeochemical cycles, environmental toxicology and applied methods of environmental analysis. The course will be conducted in a workshop format at the graduate level.
CHMA-670
3 Credits
This course will build on previous chemistry courses to expand knowledge of biogeochemical cycles, environmental toxicology and applied methods of environmental analysis. The course will be conducted in a workshop format at the graduate level.
CHEM-799
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for a masters-level student.
CHMA-621
3 Credits
This is a capstone course requiring students to develop experimental protocols involving advanced techniques in instrumental analysis. This course is intended to give an opportunity to develop innovative skills and writing proficiency. Library, literature and textbook research will be required.
PUBL-531
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change.
PUBL-631
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem augmented by readings in the primary literature. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and interrelated nature of global climate change. The course will culminate in a project based on finding solutions to the real-world problem of climate change. Students will be required to take a leadership role in bridging the multiple disciplines presented.
ENVS-531
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change.
ENVS-631
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem augmented by readings in the primary literature. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change. The course will culminate in a project based on finding solutions to the real-world problem of climate change. Students will be required to take a leadership role in bridging the multiple disciplines presented
CHEM-531
3 Credits
This multidisciplinary course will provide students with diverse perspectives on global climate change issues, providing a survey of important aspects of the problem. Topics include atmospheric chemistry, climate modeling, ecological impacts and feedbacks, economics of climate change, international climate policies, and social and environmental justice. The course will include a variety of instructors and guest lecturers, providing an overview of the complex and inter-related nature of global climate change.