Clark Hochgraf Headshot

Clark Hochgraf

Associate Professor

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology
College of Engineering Technology

585-475-3167
Office Hours
Fall 2021 T-R 3:30-4:30 pm
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
78A Lomb Memorial Drive ENT2136\n Rochester, NY 14623

Clark Hochgraf

Associate Professor

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology
College of Engineering Technology

Education

BS, State University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison

585-475-3167

Select Scholarship

Published Conference Proceedings
Hochgraf, Clark, et al. "Providing First Responders with Real-time Status of Cellular Networks During a Disaster." Proceedings of the 2018 IEEE International Symposium on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST). Ed. IEEE. Woburn, MA: IEEE, 2018. Web.
Nygate, Joseph, et al. "Applying Machine Learning in Managing Deployable Systems." Proceedings of the 2018 IEEE International Symposium on Technologies for Homeland Security (HST). Ed. IEEE. Woburn, MA: IEEE, 2018. Web.
Journal Paper
Hochgraf, Clark G., et al. "Effect of Ultracapacitor-modified PHEV Protocol on Performance Degradation in Lithium-ion Cells." Journal of Power Sources. (2012): 5. Print.
Published Article
Hochgraf, C., R. Tripathi, and S. Herzberg. “Smart Grid Charger for Electric Vehicles Using ExistingCellular Networks and Sms Text Messages.”Smart Grid Communications (SmartGridComm), 2010 First IEEE International Conference, 4-6 Oct. 2010. n.p. Print. " «
Hochgraf, C. “What If the Prius Wasn’t a Hybrid? What If the Corolla Were? An Analysis Based on Vehicle Limited Fuel Consumption and Powertrain and Braking Efficiency.” 2010 World Congress & Exhibition. Society of Automotive Engineers, 2010. n.p. Print. É «
Bellinger, Scott, and Clark Hochgraf. “Using NationalCompetitions to Focus Student Clubs.” ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition, 2010. n.p. Web. «

Currently Teaching

EEET-427
4 Credits
Develops the knowledge of control system concepts and applies them to electromechanical systems. Systems are characterized and modeled using linear systems methods, focused with a controls perspective. Impulse responses, step responses, and transfer functions are reviewed. Principles of stability and damping are developed and applied to the specification and design of open and closed loop compensators to deliver specific input-output performance. Laboratory exercises are designed to illustrate concepts, reinforce analysis and design skills, and develop instrumentation techniques associated with the lecture topics. Student must register for BOTH the Lecture and Laboratory components of this course.
EEET-520
3 Credits
Machine learning has applications in a wide variety of fields ranging from medicine and finance to telecommunications and autonomous self-driving vehicles. This course introduces machine learning and gives you the knowledge to understand and apply machine learning to solve problems in a variety of application areas. The course covers neural net structures, deep learning, support vector machines, training and testing methods, clustering, classification, and prediction with applications across a variety of fields. The focus will be on developing a foundation from which a variety of machine learning methods can be applied. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken TCET-620.
TCET-620
3 Credits
Machine learning has applications in a wide variety of fields ranging from medicine and finance to telecommunications and autonomous self-driving vehicles. This course introduces machine learning and gives you the knowledge to understand and apply machine learning to solve problems in a variety of application areas. The course covers neural net structures, deep learning, support vector machines, training and testing methods, clustering, classification, and prediction with applications across a variety of fields. The focus will be on developing a foundation from which a variety of machine learning methods can be applied. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken EEET-520.
TCET-797
3 Credits
The MSTET graduate project describes and presents the results of scholarly research in the field of telecommunications. The results of a MSTET graduate project provide new knowledge, processes, software, or other assets that advance the state of the art of telecommunications or organize or implement existing knowledge in a unique and useful way. Department permission is required.
TCET-790
3 Credits
This course continues research work started in TCET-788 Thesis Planning after completion of that initial research and documentation. The MSTET graduate thesis is a document that describes and presents the results of scholarly research in the field of telecommunications. The results of a MSTET graduate thesis provide new knowledge, processes, software or other assets that advance the state of the art of telecommunications, even in a modest way. (Department consent required)
SOIS-299
1 - 4 Credits
Special topics are experimental courses offered per semester.

In the News

  • August 11, 2021

    graphic that reads What's Happening.

    Two RIT professors named 2021 KEEN Engineering Unleashed Fellows

    Sarah Brownell, senior lecturer in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering, and Clark Hochgraf, associate professor in RIT’s College of Engineering Technology, have been named 2021 KEEN Engineering Unleashed Fellows by the Kern Entrepreneurial Engineering Network (KEEN).