Cory Stiehl Headshot

Cory Stiehl

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-2723
Office Location

Cory Stiehl

Senior Lecturer

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, University of Rochester; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Bio

Cory Stiehl joined the biomedical engineering department as a senior lecturer in August 2016. She earned her BS in chemical engineering from the University of Rochester in 1985, and her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Massachusetts in 1990. Her graduate research was in the area of advanced process control.

After completing her doctoral degree, Cory spent over ten years at NASA Ames Research Center, where she developed and led research efforts in the area of system engineering of advanced life support systems for the manned space program. Her research focused on the study of system design and integration issues and control and operation strategies for regenerative life support systems, necessary for long-duration space missions. Cory also worked with Fisher Controls for several years, performing controls research in the advanced technology department.

Cory began her academic career as an adjunct professor at Buena Vista University, where she taught courses on artificial intelligence and simulation and modeling. She then joined the Chemical Engineering Department at Iowa State University, where she has been teaching a variety of core engineering courses in addition to the capstone design course.

585-475-2723

Currently Teaching

BIME-191
3 Credits
This course introduces basic computational problem solving techniques used in engineering. Topics include: 1) Use of common engineering tools (Excel, Matlab) to analyze data, 2) Development of algorithms and flowcharts to solve engineering problems, 3) Application of basic programming concepts (input/output methods, variable types, repetition structures, decision structures, and subprograms) to create user-friendly computer programs (VBA, Matlab) that perform complex engineering calculations.
BIME-450
3 Credits
Numerical techniques necessary for engineering analysis are introduced that build upon concepts from core mathematics and engineering courses. Mathematical problems naturally arising in biomedical engineering are used to motivate the course topics and techniques taught. Tools such as MATLAB and Excel spreadsheets are used to implement numerical methods and examine data results. Topics include root-finding techniques for nonlinear equations, curve fitting using linear regression techniques, methods for solving systems of linear equations, numerical differentiation and integration methods, optimization techniques, and methods for reducing numerical error.
BIME-492
1 Credits
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-411 (Systems Physiology II) and BIME-460 (Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Laboratory experiments and simulations will be conducted to enable the prediction, observation and characterization common physiological processes and systems.
BIME-497
3 Credits
This is the first in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. This first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. The second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design.
BIME-498
3 Credits
This is the second in a two-course sequence oriented to the solution of real-world engineering design problems. This is a capstone learning experience that integrates engineering theory, principles, and processes within a collaborative environment. Multidisciplinary student teams follow a systems engineering design process, which includes assessing customer needs, developing engineering specifications, generating and evaluating concepts, choosing an approach, developing the details of the design, and implementing the design to the extent feasible, for example by building and testing a prototype or implementing a chosen set of improvements to a process. The first course focuses primarily on defining the problem and developing the design, but may include elements of build/ implementation. This second course may include elements of design, but focuses on build/implementation and communicating information about the final design.
BIME-499
0 Credits
One semester of paid work experience in biomedical engineering.
BIME-689
3 Credits
Topics and subject areas that are not regularly offered are provided under this course. Such courses are offered in a normal format; that is, regularly scheduled class sessions with an instructor. The level of complexity is commensurate with a graduate technical course.