Christopher Hoople Headshot

Christopher Hoople

Senior Lecturer
Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-7117
Office Location

Christopher Hoople

Senior Lecturer
Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, Union College; Ph.D., Cornell University

Bio

Dr. Christopher R. Hoople earned a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Union College in Schenectady, NY and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell. He worked for Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester until 2001 and joined the faculty at RIT in the fall of 2001.

At Kodak, Dr. Hoople was involved in process development for Charge Coupled Device Image Sensors. He was in charge of the Platinum Silicide process for Infra-red Detectors, and was involved in the development of Indium Tin Oxide, a transparent conductor. He was also involved in investigations of materials for light-shields and for novel doping techniques.

At RIT, Dr. Hoople has focused primarily on undergraduate education. He believes in the importance of getting the students a strong foundation to their education, and among his favorite courses to teach are Circuits I, Circuits II and Electronics. He has developed a professional elective course on Power Electronics.

Publications and Patents:

  • C.R. Hoople, J.P. Krusius “Characteristics of Submicrometer Gaps in Buried Channel Charge Coupled Device Structures” IEEE Transactions on Electron Devices vol. 38, no. 5, pp 1175-1181, 1991.
  • T.P.Chow, and C. Hoople “The Effect of Oxygen Addition on Reactive-Ion-Etched Silicon Damage in CHF3 Plasmas” Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 138, 1399-1402 (1991).
  • T.N. Blanton, C.R.Hoople “X-ray Diffraction Analysis of Ultrathin Platinum Silicide Films Deposited on (100) Silicon” Powder Diffraction vol. 17, no. 1, pp 7-9, March 2002
  1. G.A. Hawkins, E.T. Nelson, C.R. Hoople U.S. Patent # 5,241,199 “Charge coupled device (CCD) having high transfer efficiency at low temperature operation” 1993
  2. W.G. America, C.R. Hoople, L.R. Fendrock, S.L. Kosman U.S. Patent # 6,489,642 “Image sensor having improved spectral response uniformity”, December 3, 2002
585-475-7117

Currently Teaching

EEEE-221
3 Credits
This course covers the first principles and fundamentals of clean and renewable energy systems and sources. Various quantum-mechanical and electromagnetic devices and systems will be analyzed, designed and examined using software and CAD tools. Topics include: geothermal, hydro, nuclear, solar, wind, and other energy sources. Societal, ethical, economical, and environmental aspects of nanotechnology-enabled clean energy and power are also discussed.
EEEE-499
0 Credits
One semester of paid work experience in electrical engineering.
EEEE-282
3 Credits
This course covers the fundamentals of AC circuit analysis starting with the study of sinusoidal steady-state solutions for circuits in the time domain. The complex plane is introduced along with the concepts of complex exponential functions, phasors, impedances and admittances. Nodal, loop and mesh methods of analysis as well as Thevenin and related theorems are applied to the complex plane. The concept of complex power is developed. The analysis of mutual induction as applied to coupled-coils. Linear, ideal and non-ideal transformers are introduced. Complex frequency analysis is introduced to enable discussion of transfer functions, frequency dependent behavior, Bode plots, resonance phenomenon and simple filter circuits. Two-port network theory is developed and applied to circuits and interconnections.
EEEE-321
3 Credits
This course covers: 1) the first principles and fundamentals of energy conversion: 2) The fundamentals of electromechanical, related electromagnetic topics, electric variables and electromagnetic forces. The basic concepts of energy conversion systems, DC electric machines, induction & synchronous electric machines (motors & generators) used in power systems, automotive, industrial, robotics and other applications are presented. The theory of energy conversion and electromechanical motion devices are covered.
EEEE-546
3 Credits
The course involves the study of the circuits and devices used in the control and conversion of power. Devices include diodes, BJTs, power MOSFETS, IGBTs and thyristors. Power conversion includes rectifiers (ac-dc) , dc-dc, ac-ac and inverters (dc-ac). DC circuit topologies include Buck Converter, Boost Converter, Buck-Boost Converter, and the Cuk converter.
EEEE-646
3 Credits
The course involves the study of the circuits and devices used in the control and conversion of power. Devices include diodes, BJTs, power MOSFETS, IGBTs and thyristors. Power conversion includes rectifiers (ac-dc), dc-dc, ac-ac and inverters (dc-ac). DC circuit topologies include Buck Converter, Boost Converter, Buck-Boost Converter, and the Cuk converter.