Edward Brown Headshot

Edward Brown

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-7043
Office Location

Edward Brown

Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, University of Pennsylvania; MS, Ph.D., Vanderbilt University

Bio

Dr. Edward E. Brown, Jr. received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering both from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Brown is an associate faculty member in the Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering at the Rochester Institute of Technology. He is also the director of the Biomechatronic Learning Laboratory. His area of research is in the field of Rehabilitation Robotics, which is the study of how robots can be used to assist individuals with physical disabilities. Specifically, Dr. Brown is interested in multi-modal human-robot interaction, interfacing, and integration (or HRI3) for rehabilitation applications. His research activities center on developing more intelligent orthotics and wearable robotic systems that utilize human physical and physiological information. The goal is to design systems that aid individuals with diseases and disabilities that specifically affect the skeletal musculature of their upper-limb extremities, and thus impair their dexterity and mobility during reaching and grasping motions. These diseases and disabilities include muscular atrophying diseases such as Muscular Dystrophy, Polio/Post Polio Syndrome, Multiple Sclerosis, and various Spinal Cord Injuries including Central Cord Syndrome.

Dr. Brown is also interested in engineering education and developing more effective teaching, research, and mentoring strategies to address the needs of an increasingly diverse student population with diverse learning styles. His goal is to make STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) related disciplines more accessible for all students regardless of background. His ultimate desire is to create a sustainable model for increasing the number of engineers graduating successfully from college and university engineering programs.

Selected Publications

1. Smith, A., and Brown, Jr., E. E., 'Myoelectric Control Techniques for a Rehabilitation Robot,” Applied Bionics and Biomechanics, Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 21-37, 2011.

2. Nanda, P., Smith, A., Gebregiorgis, A., and Brown, Jr., E. E., 'Design and Development of an Upper Extremity Motion Capture System,' 2009 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (IEEE EMBC09), Minneapolis, MN, September 1-6, 2009

3. Smith, A., Nanda, P., and Brown Jr., E. E., 'Development of a Myoelectric Control System Based on a Time Delayed Neural Network,' 2009 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Conference (IEEE EMBC09), Minneapolis, MN, September 1-6, 2009.

4. Brown, Jr., E. E., “The ST@R Project: An Initiative to Increase the Retention Rates of 1st and 2nd Year Underrepresented Students Enrolled in Electrical Engineering,” 2007 ASEE Annual Conference, Honolulu, HI, June 24-27, 2007.

585-475-7043

Currently Teaching

BIME-440
4 Credits
Introduction to and application of signal processing techniques to evaluate and manipulate continuous and discrete time signals presumed to originate from systems that may be either linear or non-linear, time invariant or varying and random or deterministic in nature. Representative data sets will be used to characterize and process signals from physiological systems and processes. A multi-week project will be assigned that will consist of processing and analysis of a typical biomedical signal source to provide a robust and consistent evaluation of some aspect associated with the signal source based on methods discussed both in class and reported on in the literature.
BIME-460
3 Credits
Application of engineering analysis, modeling, problem solving and design skills to characterize and manipulate the operation of biomedical systems for the purpose of remediating, supplanting, replacing or enhancing the function of physiological processes. This presumes that those same tools and skills can be used to model the observed and/or known function of the physiological systems and processes under consideration. In addition to lectures, homework and examinations, the course will a project oriented assignment to design and evaluate a model that faithfully duplicates and predicts the operation of that process or system.