Dr. James E. Moon Headshot

Dr. James E. Moon

Professor
Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-7927
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
09-3061 Department of Electrical Engineering Kate Gleason College of Engineering 79 Lomb Memorial Drive Rochester, NY 14623-5603

Dr. James E. Moon

Professor
Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, Carnegie Mellon University; MBA, University of Rochester; MS, Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Dr. James E. Moon received a B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University; an M.B.A. with concentrations in finance and applied economics from the University of Rochester; an M.S. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (solid-state device physics) from the University of California at Berkeley; and a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (solid-state device physics, with minors in materials science and statistics) from the University of California at Berkeley. His thesis research was focused on device design for high-speed deep-submicrometer MOS technology.

Dr. Moon was with the Eastman Kodak Company over 20 years, holding a range of technical and managerial positions that included Director of New Business Opportunities, Senior Engineer, and Manager of Process Engineering. He left Kodak in 1998 to join start-up Kionix, Inc., where he served as Senior Engineer and Fabrication Manager for all MEMS products, as well as Project Leader for microfluidic products. He retired from Kionix in 2002 and joined the Rochester Institute of Technology as part of the full-time faculty in the Department of Electrical Engineering.

At RIT, Dr. Moon teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in semiconductor device physics, solid-state physics, communications, and electronics. He was the recipient of the 2009 Eisenhart Award for Excellence in Teaching. Dr. Moon is the holder of twenty-six issued U.S. patents; and has authored eight journal papers and fourteen conference papers. He is a member of Tau Beta Pi (engineering), Beta Gamma Sigma (business), and Phi Kappa Phi (academic) honorary societies. He is a member of ASEE and a Senior Member of IEEE.

585-475-7927

Currently Teaching

EEEE-711
3 Credits
A graduate course in the fundamental principles and operating characteristics of carrier-injection-based semiconductor devices. Advanced treatments of pn junction diodes, metal-semiconductor contacts, and bipolar junction transistors form the basis for subsequent examination of more complex carrier-injection devices, including tunnel devices, transferred-electron devices, thyristors and power devices, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), and photodetectors. Topics include heterojunction physics and heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBT).
EEEE-499
0 Credits
One semester of paid work experience in electrical engineering.
EEEE-353
4 Credits
Linear Systems provides the foundations of continuous and discrete signal and system analysis and modeling. Topics include a description of continuous linear systems via differential equations, a description of discrete systems via difference equations, input-output relationship of continuous and discrete linear systems, the continuous time convolution integral, the discrete time convolution sum, application of convolution principles to system response calculations, exponential and trigonometric forms of Fourier series and their properties, Fourier transforms including energy spectrum and energy spectral density. Sampling of continuous time signals and the sampling theorem, the Laplace, Z and DTFT. The solution of differential equations and circuit analysis problems using Laplace transforms, transfer functions of physical systems, block diagram algebra and transfer function realization is also covered. A comprehensive study of the z transform and its inverse, which includes system transfer function concepts, system frequency response and its interpretation, and the relationship of the z transform to the Fourier and Laplace transform is also covered. Finally, an introduction to the design of digital filters, which includes filter block diagrams for Finite Impulse Response (FIR) and Infinite Impulse Response (IIR) filters is introduced.
EEEE-380
3 Credits
This is an introductory course in digital MOS circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) MOSFET I-V behavior in aggressively scaled devices; (2) Static and dynamic characteristics of NMOS and CMOS inverters; (3) Combinational and sequential logic networks using CMOS technology; (4) Dynamic CMOS logic networks, including precharge-evaluate, domino and transmission gate circuits; (5) Special topics, including static and dynamic MOS memory, and interconnect RLC behavior.
EEEE-712
3 Credits
An advanced-level course on MOSFETs and submicron MOS devices. Topics include MOS capacitors, gated diodes, long-channel MOSFETs, subthreshold conduction and off-state leakage, short-channel effects, hot-carrier effects, MOS scaling and advanced MOS technologies.
EEEE-482
4 Credits
This is the second course in a two-course sequence in analog and digital electronic circuit analysis and design. The analog portion of the course covers the following topics: (1) DC and small signal analysis and design of bipolar junction transistor (BJT) circuits; (2) BJT DC biasing circuits; (3) Simple and compound BJT amplifier stages; (4) Analysis and design of BJT multi-stage amplifiers and op-amps; (5) Frequency response of BJT-based single and multi-stage amplifiers; (6) Feedback and stability in BJT and MOSFET amplifiers. The digital portion of the course covers the essential concepts and applications of digital electronic circuits implemented ins NMOS and CMOS technologies. Topics include the following: (7) static and dynamic behavior of NMOS and CMOS inverters; (8) combinational and sequential CMOS logic networks; (9) dynamic CMOS logic networks, including precharge-evaluate, domino and transmission gate techniques; (10) special topics, including static and dynamic MOS memory and low-power logic.