Jing Zhang Headshot

Jing Zhang

Associate Professor

Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering
Kate Gleason Professor

585-475-2173
Office Location

Jing Zhang

Associate Professor

Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering
Kate Gleason Professor

Education

B.S., Huazhong University of Science and Technology; Ph.D., Lehigh University

Bio

Dr. Jing Zhang is currently an Associate Professor in the Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology. Dr. Zhang’s research focuses on developing highly efficient III-Nitride and GaO semiconductor based photonic, optoelectronic, and electronic devices. Her research group is working on the development of novel quantum well active regions and substrates for enabling high-performance ultraviolet and visible LEDs/ lasers, as well as engineering of advanced device concepts for nanoelectronics. Dr. Zhang has published more than 35 refereed journal papers and 70 conference proceedings including invited talks. She is a recipient of Texas Instruments/Douglass Harvey Faculty Development Award, and National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award.

Dr. Zhang is currently looking for highly motivated B.S./M.S/Ph.D. students to join her research group.  

585-475-2173

Personal Links
Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

EEEE-499
0 Credits
One semester of paid work experience in electrical engineering.
EEEE-281
3 Credits
Covers basics of DC circuit analysis starting with the definition of voltage, current, resistance, power and energy. Linearity and superposition, together with Kirchhoff's laws, are applied to analysis of circuits having series, parallel and other combinations of circuit elements. Thevenin, Norton and maximum power transfer theorems are proved and applied. Circuits with ideal op-amps are introduced. Inductance and capacitance are introduced and the transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits to step inputs is established. Practical aspects of the properties of passive devices and batteries are discussed, as are the characteristics of battery-powered circuitry. The laboratory component incorporates use of both computer and manually controlled instrumentation including power supplies, signal generators and oscilloscopes to reinforce concepts discussed in class as well as circuit design and simulation software.
EEEE-789
3 Credits
Topics and subject areas that are not regularly offered are provided under this course. Such courses are offered in a normal format; that is, regularly scheduled class sessions with an instructor.
EEEE-480
4 Credits
This is an introductory course in analog electronic circuit analysis and design. The course covers the following topics: (1) Diode circuit DC and small-signal behavior, including rectifying as well as Zener-diode-based voltage regulation; (2) MOSFET current-voltage characteristics; (3) DC biasing of MOSFET circuits, including integrated-circuit current sources; (4) Small-signal analysis of single-transistor MOSFET amplifiers and differential amplifiers; (5) Multi-stage MOSFET amplifiers, such as cascade amplifiers, and operational amplifiers; (6) Frequency response of MOSFET-based single- and multi-stage amplifiers; (7) DC and small-signal analysis and design of bipolar junction transistor (BJT) devices and circuits; (8) Feedback and stability in MOSFET and BJT amplifiers.

In the News

  • May 11, 2021

    environmental portrait of student Joanna C. S. Santos.

    Ph.D. students take different career paths

    More than 50 students are expected to earn their Ph.D. degrees by the end of June. The hooding ceremony, which will also include Ph.D. recipients in the class of 2020, is May 15.