Robin Borkholder Headshot

Robin Borkholder

Senior Lecturer

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering
Engineering Management

585-475-2990
Office Location

Robin Borkholder

Senior Lecturer

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering
Engineering Management

Education

BS, MS, State University of New York at Buffalo

Bio

Robin Borkholder received her B.S. and M.S. in Industrial Engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Her primary teaching responsibilities are in Project Management and Production Control.

Ms. Borkholder joined the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at RIT in 2006. She teaches courses in project management, production control, and optimization. Prior to joining RIT, she worked in the semiconductor manufacturing equipment and medical devices industries. At Applied Materials, Inc. Ms. Borkholder worked as an Operations and Engineering Director supporting new product developments in Santa Clara California. At Stryker Endoscopy, she supported manufacturing and planning operations in San Jose, California.

Ms. Borkholder serves as the faculty guide for the department’s Capstone projects. She works with companies to identify problems and establish engineering projects for the students to integrate the knowledge and skills developed in their course of study and apply them in a “real world” setting in a way that helps a company improve business performance.

585-475-2990

Currently Teaching

ISEE-120
3 Credits
This course introduces students to industrial engineering and provides students with foundational tools used in the profession. The course is intended to prepare students for their first co-op experience in industrial engineering by exposing them to tools and concepts that are often encountered during early co-op assignments. The course covers specific tools and their applications, including systems design and the integration. The course uses a combination of lecture and laboratory activities. Projects and group exercises will be used to cover hands-on applications and problem-solving related to topics covered in lectures.
ISEE-420
3 Credits
A first course in mathematical modeling of production-inventory systems. Topics included: Inventory; Deterministic Models, Inventory: Stochastic Models, Push v. Pull Production Control Systems, Factory Physics, and Operations Scheduling. Modern aspects such as lean manufacturing are included in the context of the course.
ISEE-750
3 Credits
Systems and Project Management ensures progress toward objectives, proper deployment and conservation of human and financial resources, and achievement of cost and schedule targets. The focus of the course is on the utilization of a diverse set of project management methods and tools. Topics include strategic project management, project and organization learning, cost, schedule planning and control, structuring of performance measures and metrics, technical teams and project management, information technology support of teams, risk management, and process control. Course delivery consists of lectures, speakers, case studies, and experience sharing, and reinforces collaborative project-based learning and continuous improvement.
ISEE-350
3 Credits
Development of the fundamental engineering management principles of industrial enterprise, including an introduction to project management. Emphasis is on project management and the development of the project management plan. At least one term of previous co-op experience is required.
ISEE-703
3 Credits
Supply chain management is unique in that it is one of the oldest business activities and yet has been recently discovered as a potentially powerful source of competitive advantage. Supply chain system activities planning production levels, forecasting demand, managing inventory, warehousing, transportation, and locating facilities have been performed since the start of commercial activity. It is difficult to visualize any product that could reach a customer without a consciously designed supply chain. Yet it is only recently that many firms have started focusing on supply chain management. There is a realization that no company can do any better than its supply chain and logistics systems. This becomes even more important given that product life cycles are shrinking and competition is intense. Logistics and supply chain management today represents a great challenge as well as a tremendous opportunity for most firms.