Travis Meyer Headshot

Travis Meyer

Lecturer

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-7407
Office Location

Travis Meyer

Lecturer

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-7407

Currently Teaching

BIME-200
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics in the context of biomechanics. The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how the musculoskeletal system reacts to various mechanical forces applied to it in both static and dynamic conditions. Sporting examples are used to illustrate how classical Newtonian mechanics is applied in human locomotion externally, in interactions with the environment. The course describes how basics of kinetics and kinematics are used to analyze the mechanics of human movement and inanimate objects. The main areas addressed are static equilibrium, mechanical stability, linear and angular kinematics, motion with constant and non-constant acceleration, collision and conservation of momentum, work, energy, and power. The course develops an awareness and appreciation of both qualitative and quantitative data collection methods within the field of biomechanics. In addition to rigid body mechanics, the course also introduces students to the concepts of stress and strain and how they affect muscle tissue and bones. Mechanical properties such as stiffness, strength, toughness, and fatigue resistance are considered in the context of bone structures and loading.
BIME-407
3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the biodesign process used for innovating medical technologies. Student teams will apply a needs-based assessment strategy to identify opportunities in a biomedical related field such as assistive technologies and rehabilitation engineering. Incorporating CAD will culminate in a virtual medical device prototype. Concepts of intellectual property, regulatory considerations, and reimbursement and business models will be introduced.
BIME-411
3 Credits
The focus of this course will be on the interaction between organ systems for the purpose of maintaining overall homeostasis. Attention will be paid to feedback mechanisms that involve electrical and chemical feedback and control systems. The interactions between systems (cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal) and how they affect fluid and electrolyte balance, material exchange and disease processes will be discussed. Throughout the course, diseases and disorders of the various systems will be discussed. Students will learn to analyze the systems in a quantitative manner based on engineering analysis.
BIME-470
3 Credits
This hands-on course gives engineering students experience with different culture platforms and analysis techniques. Students will be given experiments relating to current literature and state of the art techniques in the area of Tissue Engineering. In a project-based course style, individual experiments require multiple weeks and students will be expected to maintain their own cultures.