William Humphrey Headshot

William Humphrey

Senior Lecturer
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-5628
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
ENG(17)-2523

William Humphrey

Senior Lecturer
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, MS, Case Western Reserve University

Bio

Mr. William Humphrey is an accomplished mechanical engineer experienced in automotive product development testing and testing systems optimization as well as engineering education. He was a Ph.D. candidate in Mechanical Engineering at Carnegie Mellon University studying atomization and sprays, and earned his M.S. and B.S. degrees in Fluid, Thermal & Aerospace Engineering Science from Case Western Reserve University. Prior to joining the mechanical engineering faculty full-time as a Lecturer in 2009, he taught as an adjunct faculty member in mechanical engineering while working in the automotive industry for Delphi Corporation. Mr. Humphrey is committed to enabling students to develop intuitive understanding of fundamental concepts to maximize their ability to retain and successfully apply the concepts beyond the classroom.

In addition to his formal education in aerospace and mechanical engineering, Mr. Humphrey has nearly a decade of industrial work experience in the automotive industry with Delphi and Trialon Corporations. He has outstanding laboratory experience, and while working at Delphi, he specialized in testing of automotive fuel injector sprays. He received a “trade secret” award from Delphi for a testing and data analysis technique for synchronized high-speed video imaging and time-resolved droplet size measurements to explain seemingly anomalous results in the droplet size measurements of pulsing fuel injector sprays. Mr. Humphrey also automated test data analysis and test request processes to increase the efficiency of the fuel injector spray test lab, reducing processing time and rework by over 75%.

Select Publications

Chmiel, D., C. Ospina, W. Humphrey, L. Markle & F. Brado, “Quantification of Variation in Laser Diffraction Gasoline Fuel Injector Droplet Sizing”, Proceedings of the 21st Annual Conference, ILASS-Americas, Orlando, FL, 2008

Hung, D., W. Humphrey & L. Markle, “Transient Drop Size Characterization of Pulsing Sprays using a Technique Combining Laser Diffraction and Synchronized Imaging”, Proceedings of the 16th Annual Conference, ILASS-Americas, Monterey, CA, 2004

Hung, D., W. Humphrey, L. Markle, D. Chmiel, C. Ospina & F. Brado, “A Novel Transient Drop Sizing Technique for Investigating the Role of Gasoline Injector Sprays in Fuel Mixture Preparation”, Combustion and Flow Diagnostics (Special Publications Paper Collection SP-1831), SAE International, 2004

Corcoran, T., R. Hitron, W. Humphrey & N. Chigier, “Optical Measurement of Nebulizer Sprays: A quantitative comparison of diffraction, phase Doppler interferometry, and time of flight techniques”, Journal of Aerosol Science, Vol. 31, No. 1, 2000

585-475-5628

Currently Teaching

MECE-117
3 Credits
This course provides the student with an overview of the use of computer programming for solving problems encountered in engineering. Students will learn how to develop an algorithm for solving a problem and to translate that algorithm into computer code using fundamental structured programming techniques. The programming language(s) employed are selected to support computational problem-solving in higher-level mechanical engineering courses.
MECE-306
1 Credits
A required laboratory course taken concurrently with MECE-304 Fundamentals of Materials Science or MECE-305 Materials Science with Applications. Students investigate the effects of the structure, alloying, and processing of materials on their mechanical properties. Students are also introduced to standardized testing methods and effective, professional, report writing.
MECE-348
3 Credits
This course introduces students to contemporary technologies in a specific field of mechanical engineering. In the process of exploring these technologies, the course teaches and applies skills related to communication, economic analysis, ethical analysis, and explores the positive and negative effects of technologies on our society and environment. Specific attention is focused on current events both domestically and internationally.
MECE-524
3 Credits
The course focuses on the fundamentals of ground vehicle motion, control, and stability. The structure, stiffness, and mechanisms by which tires generate longitudinal and lateral forces and self-aligning moments are discussed. Steering geometry and steady-state and transient steering response for bicycle and four-wheel vehicle models are analyzed. The effect of suspension geometry and stiffness on stability and ride are discussed. Transmission system design to match engine characteristics and achieve required vehicle performance is discussed.
MECE-624
3 Credits
The course focuses on the fundamentals of ground vehicle motion, control, and stability. The structure, stiffnes, and mechanisms by which tires generate longitudinal and lateral forces and self-aligning moments are discussed. Steering geometry and steady-state and transient steering response for bicycle and four-wheel vehicle models are analyzed. The effect of suspension geometry and stiffness on stability and ride are discussed. Transmission system design to match engine characteristics and achieve required vehicle performance is discussed.