Brian Rice Headshot

Brian Rice

Associate Professor

Department of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology
College of Engineering Technology

585-475-5531
Office Location

Brian Rice

Associate Professor

Department of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology
College of Engineering Technology

Education

BS, University of Buffalo; MS, Ph.D., University of Rochester

Bio

Dr. Brian Rice joined the RIT faculty after spending over 25 years in applied research while working at University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Lockheed Martin Corporation, and Eastman Kodak Company.  At these companies he designed, analyzed and tested space-based optical satellites, robotically controlled manufacturing process for light-weight optics, elastohydrodynamic lubricated air bearings, control algorithms to maintain color-to-color registration for printing presses, light-weight mobile radar systems, and low-vibration mounts for hydrogen fuel pellets and methods to control the uniformity of the fuel’s ice-gas phase boundary for inertial confinement fusion experiments at cryogenic conditions. 

Since joining RIT, his research has focused on system dynamics and controls, solid mechanics, and heat transfer.  In particular the application of Finite Element Analysis to linear and nonlinear transient multi-physic problems using ANSYS, and the design of feedback control algorithms for dynamic systems represented by ordinary differential equations using Matlab/Simulink. He currently holds six patents and is lead author on four journal articles.

Dr. Rice has taught a variety of college courses including graduate level Finite Elements; senior level Dynamics and Control of Biomedical Systems, Mechanical Design; and freshman/sophomore level Fundamentals of Engineering, Statics, Dynamics, and Mechanics of Materials. His teaching draws on his industrial experience which helps students see how the theory they are learning, through hands-on exercises, applies to real world problems. 

585-475-5531

Select Scholarship

Externally Funded Grants

  • Joint Research Initiative between RIT's MMET Dept. and UofRs LLE, DOE funded. PI Brian Rice, 10/1/20-9/30/21, $50,393.
  • Joint Research Initiative between RIT's MMET Dept. and UofRs LLE, DOE funded. PI Brian Rice, 10/1/19-9/30/20, $50,196.
  • Joint Research Initiative between RIT's MMET Dept. and UofR's LLE, DOE funded. PI Brian Rice, 7/1/17-9/30/19, $100,015.
  • Filter Building Control Room Noise Reduction Investigation/MMET Enterprise Center, funded by Morton Salt Inc., PI Brian Rice, 5/20/19-12/20/19, $11,000.
  • Vacuum Chamber Design Investigation/MMET Enterprise Center, funded by Vacuum Innovations Inc., PI Brian Rice, 6/15/20-12/31/20, $10,123.
  • Pry Bar Stress Analysis/MMET Enterprise Center, funded by Global Defense Inc., PI Brian Rice, 9/15/20-12/31/20, $1,002.
  • Software grant-Simcenter TestLab, software provided by Siemens Inc., PI Brian Rice, 7/1/2021-6/30/22, $50,000.

 

Patents:

  • "Non-Marking Web Conveyance Roller and Method of Making Same," United States Patent number 6,884,205, April 2005. G. L. VanNoy, B. S. Rice, F. Ramos, D. C. Lioy at Eastman Kodak Company. 
  • "Corona Discharge Treatment Roller and Surface Finishing Process," United States Patent number 6,436,191, August 2002. A. M. Stewart and B. S. Rice at Eastman Kodak Company. 
  • "Process for Finishing the Surface of a Corona Discharge Treatment Roller," United States Patent number 6,423,259, July 2002. A. M. Stewart and B. S. Rice at Eastman Kodak Company. 
  • "Apparatus and Method for Aligning Webs," United States Patent number 6,192,955, February 2001. B. S. Rice at Eastman Kodak Company. 
  • "Corona Discharge Treatment Roller and Surface Finishing Process," United States Patent number 6,142,409, November 2000. A. M. Stewart and B. S. Rice at Eastman Kodak Company. 
  • "Apparatus and Method for Aligning Webs," United States Patent number 5,849,123, December 1998. B. S. Rice at Eastman Kodak Company.

Currently Teaching

ENGT-510
0 Credits
This faculty directed undergraduate research experience involves student(s) in a research project. Under the guidance of CET faculty and using one or a variety of methods, students will collect data and contribute to problem solving within a research environment. As an undergraduate research experience, emphasis is on the process of scientific research, including problem definition, formulating a research plan, data collection/analysis and interpretation based on existing research. Department permission is required.
MCET-220
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of structures and machines. Students learn to calculate unknown forces using the concept of equilibrium and free body diagrams and to calculate simple stresses and deflections for axially loaded members. Topics include forces, moments, free body diagrams, equilibrium, friction, stress, strain, and deflection. Examples are drawn from mechanical, manufacturing, and civil engineering technology.
MCET-221
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the analysis and design of structures and machines. Students learn to calculate stresses and deflections in axially loaded members, beams, shafts, and columns. Topics include statically indeterminate problems, thermal stress, stress concentration, combined stress by superposition, and Mohr’s Circle. Students also gain experience with teamwork, project management, and communications as they complete recitation and project assignments.
MCET-320
3 Credits
Principles of engineering dynamics and the solution of practical engineering problems using engineering dynamics are studied. The dynamic analysis of particles and rigid bodies are performed using the three fundamental analytical methods. These include Force-Acceleration, Work-Energy, and Impulse-Momentum methods. An emphasis is placed on the application of these methods to the solution of real engineering problems. In addition, this course introduces the study of vibration in a mass, spring, and damper system. Students will evaluate real problems experimentally, analytically and through computer simulation.
MCET-430
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the properties of pure substances, gas laws, first law of thermodynamics, along with an introduction to fluid mechanics are studied and applied. Students learn through an integrated presentation of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics how to approach and solve reasonable thermal-fluid problems. Topics include the first law of thermodynamics, specific heat, ideal gases, work, energy, lumped systems, fluid statics, conservation of mass/energy, laminar, and turbulent flow. Examples are drawn from mechanical, and electrical mechanical engineering technology.
MCET-595
3 Credits
This course focuses on using commercial finite element analysis (FEA) software to analyze linear and non-linear systems in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Students will utilize a wide variety of analysis techniques including deflection, stress, mode shapes, optimization, heat transfer, and thermal-stress. In addition, projects using FEA to solve problems of interest to the student are required. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken MCET-695.
MCET-695
3 Credits
This course focuses on using commercial finite element analysis (FEA) software to analyze complex linear and non-linear systems in the areas of structural mechanics and heat transfer. Students will utilize a wide variety of analysis techniques including deflection, stress, mode shapes, optimization, heat transfer, and thermal-stress. A semester long project using FEA to solve an advanced problem relevant to each student’s interest area is required. In addition, students will be given problems that extend beyond the material covered in class that will require independent investigation. Students may not take and receive credit for this course if they have already taken MCET-595 Students that do not have undergraduate background in FEA should not take this graduate course. It is recommended students discuss in advance with the instructor before registering to determine their level of experience.
MECA-290
3 Credits
Students will learn the applications of mechanics through the examination of mechatronic elements and systems. It is broken into two parts: Fundamentals of Mechanics of Materials (a.k.a. Strength of Materials) You will learn to calculate stresses and deflections in members loaded under axial, transverse, and torsional loads. Fundamentals of Dynamics You will learn to use kinematics (study of motion without regard to forces) and kinetics (study of forces required to cause motion, e.g., Newton’s Laws of Motion) to calculate the motion of particles and rigid bodies in motion. You will also gain experience with computational tools, laboratory equipment, experimental methods, teamwork, project management and communications as you complete project assignments.
RMET-788
3 Credits
Students will rigorously develop their thesis research ideas, conduct literature reviews, identify and plan methodologies, prepare schedules, and gain a clear understanding of the expectations of the faculty and the discipline. Each student will be required to prepare a committee approved thesis research proposal and may begin work on their thesis.
RMET-790
3 Credits
The MMSI thesis is based on thorough literature review and experimental substantiation of a problem, by the candidate, in an appropriate topic. A written proposal has to be defended and authorized by the faculty adviser/committee. The proposal defense is followed by experimental work, a formal written thesis, and oral presentation of findings. The candidate should have completed the requisite courses for the program before enrolling for the thesis.
RMET-797
3 Credits
This course provides the MMSI graduate students an opportunity to complete their degree requirements by addressing a practical real-world challenge using the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their studies. This course is not only the culmination of a student's course work but also an indicator of the student's ability to use diverse knowledge to provide a tangible solution to a problem. The capstone project topic can be in the areas of product development, manufacturing automation, management system, quality management or electronics packaging. The course requires a comprehensive project report and a final presentation.
RMET-798
0 Credits
Continuation of Capstone

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