Beth VanWinkle Headshot

Beth VanWinkle

Visiting Lecturer
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-2070
Office Location

Beth VanWinkle

Visiting Lecturer
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

BS, Rochester Institute of Technology; Ph.D., University of Rochester

585-475-2070

Currently Teaching

BIOL-301
1 - 4 Credits
This course allows students to assist in a class or laboratory for which they have previously earned credit. The student will assist the instructor in the operation of the course. Assistance by the student may include fielding questions, helping in workshops, and assisting in review sessions. In the case of labs, students may also be asked to help with supervising safety practices, waste manifestation, and instrumentation.
BIOG-141
3 Credits
This is the second of a two-course sequence designed to introduce biomedical engineering students to the molecular and cellular basis of life with a particular emphasis on the integration of molecular systems in human physiology. This course will continue exploring sub-cellular systems by touring the function of each cellular organelle and describing the pathologic consequences that result from interruption of its normal function. Major topics will include: cellular energy production; the cytoskeleton; the lysosome; the plasma membrane; vesicle transport; cell-cell communication; signaling pathways; the cell cycle; and cell division.
BIOG-142
3 Credits
This course combines a traditional basic immunology course with an introduction to principles of the human tissue response to biomaterial implantation. Information is presented in the context of common immune system pathologies to emphasize the relevance of immunology to biomedical engineering and human physiology. Major topics include the organization of the immune system and its myriad cells and cytokines, a review of bacterial and viral lifecycles, antibody/antigen specificity, inflammation, bacterial adhesion, biomaterial surface characterization and sterilization. Students explore biocompatibility testing, and learn the molecular basis for surface recognition and masking in implanted materials. The course emphasizes the interaction of various immune system components with engineered biological devices, implants, cells and tissues, and explores strategies and solutions for maximizing biocompatibility of engineered biomaterials with the immune system.
BIOG-140
3 Credits
This is the first course of a two-course sequence designed to introduce biomedical engineering students to the molecular and cellular basis of life with a particular emphasis on the integration of molecular systems that underscore human physiology. This course will start with the basic chemistry of biological macromolecules and then explore the cell starting from the nucleus and moving outward. Major topics will include: DNA replication; molecular basis of inheritance; the biology of RNA; gene expression; protein synthesis; the secretory pathways; and enzyme kinetics.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
BIOL-303
3 Credits
This course is a study of functional eukaryotic cellular physiology with an emphasis on the role of global gene expression in cellular function and disease. Nuclear and cytoplasmic regulation of macromolecular synthesis, regulation of cellular metabolism, control of cell growth, and the changes in cell physiology in disease are covered. This course also covers the technology used for studying changes in gene expression associated with cell differentiation and disease. The associated laboratory covers microarray techniques. This includes design and implementation of an experiment to acquire gene expression data, analyzing the acquired data using simple computer programs, such as MAGIC, and writing a research paper explaining findings.
BIOL-189
1 - 4 Credits
This is an introductory course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures. (Permission of instructor)