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Our Mission

We encourage our students to discover their potential while expanding fundamental scientific knowledge and developing new technologies. We prepare our graduates by providing academic programs in STEM disciplines to meet the challenges of a complex world.

Statistics

4

Ph.D. Programs

Programs include astrophysical sciences and technology, color science, imaging science, and mathematical modeling

11

Research Centers and Laboratories

College of Science boasts state-of-the-art facilities with specialized labs and equipment for conducting research

3rd

Largest Source of Undergraduate STEM Degrees

RIT is among the top producers of undergraduate STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) degrees among all private universities in the nation

4

Research Experiences for Undergraduates

REUs allow students to conduct research away from home universities

Discover Your Passion

Meet the Dean

Sophia Maggelakis

Scientists and mathematicians challenge accepted truths and seek new discoveries. The College of Science encourages students to leverage this passion and prepares world leaders who will expand the frontiers of science and mathematics and their application in making our communities and our world better.

Sophia Maggelakis
Dean College of Science
585-475-5127

Faces of RIT

Latest News

  • November 15, 2019

    panel of three female students sitting at a table

    What Students Wish Faculty Knew

    A voluntary panel of students facilitated a valuable discussion during the Inclusive Excellence event, "What Students Wish Faculty Knew."

  • November 8, 2019

    Simulation of an accretion disk surrounding a supermassive black hole.

    New study suggests ‘Pac-Man-like’ mergers could explain massive, spinning black holes

    Scientists have reported detecting gravitational waves from 10 black hole mergers to date, but they are still trying to explain the origins of those mergers. The largest merger detected so far seems to have defied previous models because it has a higher spin and mass than the range thought possible. A group of researchers, including RIT Assistant Professor Richard O’Shaughnessy, has created simulations that could explain how the merger happened.

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