Christopher Thorstenson Headshot

Christopher Thorstenson

Assistant Professor

Color Science Program
College of Science

585-475-7189
Office Location

Christopher Thorstenson

Assistant Professor

Color Science Program
College of Science

Bio

Chris studies how we perceive and evaluate color appearance of human faces. 

His research primarily investigates how the visual system perceives even subtle variations in face and skin color (e.g., visual detection, discrimination), and how facial color can influence judgments about the person (e.g., preference, emotion)

This research focuses not only on real human faces, but also includes artificial social agents (e.g., social robots, avatars, emojis), as well as perceiving faces in virtual- and augmented- reality environments.

Chris is also broadly interested in color-emotion associations, measurement of skin color, and appearance of skin tones in art.

585-475-7189

Personal Links

Currently Teaching

CGNS-451
1 Credits
Cognitive Neuroscience Seminar A is a weekly forum in which students will learn about and discuss historical and current topics in cognitive neuroscience. The course focuses on journal club discussions of papers selected by the students and faculty. It also includes oral presentations from students and faculty as well as visiting speakers from within and external to RIT. Students will prepare their own oral presentations and written assignments based on the course readings and independent research. Students will develop professional skills required for formal scientific presentations and writing.
CLRS-689
1 - 4 Credits
This is an introductory graduate course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures.
CLRS-720
3 Credits
Computational Vision Science This course provides an introduction to modern computer-based methods for the measurement and modeling of human vision. Lectures will introduce the experimental techniques of visual psychophysics including threshold measurement, psychometric functions, signal detection theory, and indirect, direct, and multidimensional scaling. Lectures will also introduce the MATLAB technical computing environment and will teach how to use MATLAB to run computer-based psychophysical experiments and to analyze experimental data and visualize results. Laboratory exercises will provide practical experience in using computer-based tools to conduct psychophysical experiments and to develop computational models of the results. Prior experience in vision science and/or scientific computing will be helpful but is not required.
CLRS-751
2 Credits
Color Science Seminar II is a weekly forum in which students will learn about current research topics in color science. The course focuses on journal club discussions of papers selected by the students and faculty. It also includes oral presentations from students, laboratory staff, and faculty as well as visiting speakers from within and external to RIT. Students will prepare their own oral presentations and written assignments based on the course readings and independent research. Students will further develop professional skills required for formal scientific presentations and writing. A draft thesis or dissertation proposal will also be prepared.
CLRS-790
1 - 6 Credits
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.
CLRS-890
1 - 6 Credits
Masters-level research by the candidate on an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the research advisor.

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