Carmody McCalley Headshot

Carmody McCalley

Assistant Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-6258
Office Location

Carmody McCalley

Assistant Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

BA, Middlebury College; Ph.D., Cornell University

585-475-6258

Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

ENVS-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in the Environmental Science graduate program.
ENVS-301
4 Credits
Environmental Science Field Skills presents an integrated approach to the interrelated, interdisciplinary principles of environmental science through case studies, site visits and field work. In this course, the focus will be on learning methods for environmental analysis, including experimental design, water and soil quality, primary production and biodiversity, land use/land cover change and ecosystem restoration. The course will culminate in a stressed stream analysis of a local watershed. Additional topics may include geographic information systems, wetlands, environmental education and sustainable food production. The interdisciplinary nature of environmental science will be illustrated through elements of government/political science/policy, ethics, economics, sociology, history and engineering.
ENVS-791
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
ENVS-795
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a graduate level, faculty-directed, student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in Environmental Science graduate program.
ENVS-790
1 - 4 Credits
The thesis option will be available to environmental science graduate students only with prior written approval of program faculty. Students will submit a proposal to a faculty member who agrees to serve as the student's thesis committee chair. The proposal will describe the basic research question to be investigated and the experimental protocols to be employed. Proposals will be reviewed by the program faculty who will give permission to register for thesis credit. This course may be taken several times over the course of a student's graduate program, for variable credits. A written thesis and oral defense are required at the completion of the thesis research.
ENVS-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
ENVS-101
3 Credits
This course is the foundation course for the Environmental Science major and presents an integrated approach to the interrelated, interdisciplinary principles of environmental science through lecture, case studies and active participation. In this course, the focus will be on sustainability as the foundation for problem solving while investigating a number of environmental issues and establishing environmental literacy. Topics may include biodiversity, ecosystems, pollution, energy, and global climate change. To demonstrate the interdisciplinary methodology of environmental science, elements of government/political science/policy, ethics, economics, sociology, history and engineering are embedded in the scientific matrix used to present this course.
ENVS-201
3 Credits
This workshop serves as the second core course for the Environmental Science major. Through in-class exercises, outside labs, and field trips, students will begin to learn problem solving and analytical skills needed to investigate and address environmental issues. Topics may include assessing campus biodiversity and ecosystems, calculating personal and campus ecological footprints and sustainability indexes, environmental modeling, and campus sustainability projects. To demonstrate the interdisciplinary methodology of environmental science, elements of government/political science/policy, ethics, economics, sociology, and history are embedded in the scientific matrix used to present this course.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Singleton, C. M., et al. "Methanotrophy across a natural permafrost thaw environment." The ISME Journal. (2018): doi:0.1038/s41396-018-0065-5. Web.
Hodgekins, Suzanne B, et al. "Elemental Composition and Optical Properties Reveal Changes in Dissolved Organic Matter Along a Permafrost Thaw Chronosequence in a Subarctic Peatland." Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 187. (2016): 123-140. Print.
Hodgekins, Suzanne B., et al. "Soil Incubations Reproduce Field Methane Dynamics in a Subarctic Wetland." Biogeochemistry 126. (2015): 241-249. Print.