Elizabeth Hane Headshot

Elizabeth Hane

Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-4362
Office Location

Elizabeth Hane

Associate Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

BA, Rice University; MA, University of Kansas; Ph.D., Brown University

585-475-4362

Currently Teaching

ENVS-489
1 - 4 Credits
This is an advanced course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures.
ENVS-790
1 - 4 Credits
The thesis option will be available to environmental science graduate students only with prior written approval of program faculty. Students will submit a proposal to a faculty member who agrees to serve as the student's thesis committee chair. The proposal will describe the basic research question to be investigated and the experimental protocols to be employed. Proposals will be reviewed by the program faculty who will give permission to register for thesis credit. This course may be taken several times over the course of a student's graduate program, for variable credits. A written thesis and oral defense are required at the completion of the thesis research.
ENVS-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in the Environmental Science graduate program.
ENVS-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
BIOL-675
3 Credits
This course focuses on the application of ecological principles to conservation issues. Human impact on species diversity will be emphasized as it relates to agricultural, forest, coastal and wetland ecosystems. Case studies of management practices used to manage and restore disturbed ecosystems will be included. Students will explore a topic in depth through writing a review paper of published literature.
ENVS-791
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
ENVS-795
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a graduate level, faculty-directed, student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in Environmental Science graduate program.
BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed, graduate level tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
BIOL-301
1 - 4 Credits
This course allows students to assist in a class or laboratory for which they have previously earned credit. The student will assist the instructor in the operation of the course. Assistance by the student may include fielding questions, helping in workshops, and assisting in review sessions. In the case of labs, students may also be asked to help with supervising safety practices, waste manifestation, and instrumentation.
BIOL-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
ITDS-150
3 Credits
This course serves two purposes. One is to introduce students to metacognition, reflective practice and self-assessment. Students will explore how the continual assessment of one's own knowledge guides scientific progress in the development of both research and theoretical practice. The second is to apply metacognitive techniques to exploring scientific investigation from a combination of scientific, ethical and societal standpoints. Examples will be drawn from student interest, and may include topics such as: Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear disasters, genetically modified organisms, indoor air quality, invasive species, forensic science. Metacognitive issues such as learning theory, stereotype threat and self-assessment will be explored for their role in the acquisition of scientific knowledge.
BIOL-295
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their first three years of study.
BIOL-240
4 Credits
This course is an introduction to population, community and ecosystem ecology, stressing the dynamic interrelationships of plant and animal communities with their environments. The course includes such ecological concepts as energy flow and trophic levels in natural communities, population and community dynamics, biogeography and ecosystem ecology.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Franklin, Scott V., et al. "Improving Retention Through Metacognition: A Program for Deaf/Hard-of-Hearing and First Generation STEM College Students." Journal of College Science Teaching 48. 2 (2018): 21-27. Print.
Brister, E., E. Hane, and K. Korfmacher. "Visualizing Plant Community Change Using Historical Records." International Journal of Applied Geospatial Research 2. 4 (2011): 1-18. Print.
Published Conference Proceedings
Hane, Elizabeth N. and Scott V. Franklin. "A Metacognitive Toolkit to Improve Retention of STEM Students from Excluded Identities." Proceedings of the AAC&U Transforming STEM Education Conference, November, 2018, Atlanta, GA. Ed. AAC&U. Washington, DC: n.p., Web.
Matheson, Amanda, et al. "Guided and Unguided Student Reflections." Proceedings of the Physics Education Research Conference. Ed. H. Vincent Kuo. Cincinnati, Ohio: PER-Central, 2017. Print.
Hane, Elizabeth and Karl Korfmacher. "From Rochester to Malmo: An International Cross-Institutional Study Abroad Course." Proceedings of the Ecological Society of America. Ed. ESA Editorial Board. Portland, Oregon: Ecological Society of America, 2017. Web.
Hane, Elizabeth and Evelyn Brister. "An Intervention to Reduce Confirmation Bias in First-Year STEM Students." Proceedings of the AAC&U STEM Education Conference. Ed. AAC&U. San Francisco, CA: AAC&U, 2017. Web.