Gerald Takacs Headshot

Gerald Takacs

Professor

School of Chemistry and Materials Science
College of Science

585-475-2047
Office Location

Gerald Takacs

Professor

School of Chemistry and Materials Science
College of Science

Education

B.S. (Honors), University of Alberta (Edmonton); Ph.D., University of Wisconsin (Madison); Post Doc, Rice University; Teaching Intern/Research Associate, University of Alabama (Huntsville); National Research Council Senior Research Associate, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Bio

My research is currently investigating the surface modification of materials as a function of treatment time using techniques including: (1) UV photons; (2) vacuum UV (VUV) photons produced downstream from low-pressure microwave plasmas of rare gases; (3) VUV radiation from inert gas excimers formed in high pressure DC arc experiments; and (4) reactive neutral gaseous particles, such as O atoms and ozone. Surface modification is a key technology for the processing and manufacture of many materials by altering the chemical and physical properties of the surface (as often detected by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurements, and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)) without changing the bulk properties. Recent projects have involved the surface modification of polymers and carbon nanotubes important in fuel cell, water purification, aerospace, microelectronics, and nanotechnology industries.

585-475-2047

Areas of Expertise

Select Scholarship

Gerald A. Takacs, Massoud J. Miri, and Timothy Kovach*, “Vacuum UV Surface Photo-oxidation of Polymeric and Other Materials for Improving Adhesion: A Critical Review”, Progress in Adhesion and Adhesives, 6, 559-585 (2021). DOI:10.1002/9781119846703

Ibrahim Cisse*, Sarah Oakes*, Shreen Sachdev*, Marc Toro*, Shin Lutondo*, Devon Shedden*, Kristen Margaret Atkinson*, Joel Shertok, Michael Mehan,Surendra K. Gupta, and Gerald A. Takacs, “Surface Modification of Polyethersulfone (PES) with UV Photo-Oxidation”, Technologies, 9(2), 36 (2021). DOI:10.3390/technologies9020036

Timothy Kovach*, Samuel Boyd*, Anthony Garcia*, Andrew Fleischer*, Katerine Vega*, Regina Hilfiker*, Joel Shertok, Michael Mehan, Surendra K. Gupta, and Gerald A., “Surface Modification of Polybenzimidazole (PBI) with Microwave Generated Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) Photo-oxidation”, Current Microwave Chemistry, (2021). DOI:10.2174/2213335608666210908123730

*RIT Students

Currently Teaching

CHMG-131
3 Credits
This rigorous course is primarily for, but not limited to, engineering students. Topics include an introduction to some basic concepts in chemistry, stoichiometry, First Law of Thermodynamics, thermochemistry, electronic theory of composition and structure, and chemical bonding. The lecture is supported by workshop-style problem sessions. Offered in traditional and online format.
CHEM-781
0 Credits
This course is a graduate course for students enrolled in the Project track of the MS Chemistry Program. (Enrollment in this course requires permission from the School of Chemistry and Materials Science offering the course.)
CHMB-493
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research in biochemistry that could be considered of an original nature.
CHMB-495
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
MTSE-777
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a capstone project using research facilities available inside or outside of RIT.
CHEM-493
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research in chemistry that could be considered of an original nature.
CHEM-799
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for a masters-level student.
CHEM-495
1 - 3 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
CHMP-441
3 Credits
This course provides fundamental concepts, and organizing principles, applied in all aspects of chemistry and related fields. A rigorous and detailed explanation of central, unifying concepts in thermodynamics and chemical kinetics will be developed. Mathematical models that provide quantitative predictions will be described for thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. These contain the mathematical underpinnings to concepts applied in analytical, inorganic, organic, and biochemistry courses, as well as more advanced topics in chemistry. The course will cover: gases, temperature, energy and the First Law of Thermodynamics, entropy and the Second and Third laws, Helmholtz and Gibbs free energies, criteria for equilibrium and spontaneity, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetic molecular theory and chemical kinetics.
CHEM-780
1 - 4 Credits
Chemistry project accomplished by the MS student for an appropriate topic as arranged between the candidate and the project advisor.
MTSE-799
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for a masters-level student.

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