Karl Korfmacher Headshot

Karl Korfmacher

Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

585-475-5554
Office Location

Karl Korfmacher

Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences
College of Science

Education

MS, Ph.D. in Environmental Management, Duke University

Bio

Co-director of the Laboratory for Environmental Computing and Decision Making (LECDM) -, pollution modelling of freight transport, GIS-based habitat monitoring and measurement, hydrologic and water quality modelling, place based environmental education, service learning

585-475-5554

Areas of Expertise
Environmental and ecological modelling
Spatial analyses
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications

Currently Teaching

ENVS-489
1 - 4 Credits
This is an advanced course on a topic that is not part of the formal curriculum. This course is structured as an ordinary course and has specific prerequisites, contact hours, and examination procedures.
ENVS-650
4 Credits
Aerial photography, satellite imagery, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are extremely useful tools in hydrologic modeling and environmental applications such as rainfall runoff modeling, pollution loading, landscape change analyses, and terrain modeling. This course will: 1) introduce students to spatial analysis theories, techniques and issues associated with hydrologic and environmental applications; 2) provide hands-on training in the use of these spatial tools and models while addressing a real problem; 3) provide experience linking GIS and model results to field assessments and monitoring activities; 4) enable students to solve a variety of spatial and temporal hydrologic and environmental problems; and 5) provide tools useful for addressing environmental problems related to the graduate thesis or project.
ENVS-450
4 Credits
Aerial photography, satellite imagery, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are extremely useful tools in hydrologic modeling and environmental applications such as rainfall runoff modeling, pollution loading, landscape change analyses, and terrain modeling. This course will: 1) introduce students to spatial analysis theories, techniques and issues associated with hydrologic and environmental applications; 2) provide hands-on training in the use of these spatial tools and models while addressing a real problem; 3) provide experience linking GIS and model results to field assessments and monitoring activities; and 4) enable students to solve a variety of spatial and temporal hydrologic and environmental problems.
ENVS-791
0 Credits
Continuation of Thesis
ENVS-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in the Environmental Science graduate program.
ENVS-795
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a graduate level, faculty-directed, student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in Environmental Science graduate program.
ENVS-790
1 - 4 Credits
The thesis option will be available to environmental science graduate students only with prior written approval of program faculty. Students will submit a proposal to a faculty member who agrees to serve as the student's thesis committee chair. The proposal will describe the basic research question to be investigated and the experimental protocols to be employed. Proposals will be reviewed by the program faculty who will give permission to register for thesis credit. This course may be taken several times over the course of a student's graduate program, for variable credits. A written thesis and oral defense are required at the completion of the thesis research.
ENVS-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
ENVS-111
4 Credits
This is an introductory course on soil science, covering concepts such as soil taxonomy, soil ecology, physical soil properties, soil formation and geomorphology, and soil conservation. The lecture portion of the course will consist of in-class demonstrations and exercises, discussion groups, and traditional lecture materials. Lab exercises will focus on field sampling techniques and bench analyses, soil texture and partial size analyses, basic soil chemistry properties, land use planning, and spatial analyses.
ENVS-250
4 Credits
Through hands-on projects and case studies, this course illustrates concepts and applications of raster and vector geographic information systems (GIS) in a variety of disciplines, such as environmental science, biology, geology, geography, sociology, and economics. Students will learn how to use GIS software and spatial analyses, plan a project, create a database, and conduct an independent project. Students should have completed a foundational course in their major and be comfortable working with computers. Experience with programming is also useful. (Foundational course in student's major field of study or permission of instructor).
BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-798
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed, graduate level tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum.
BIOL-498
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their final two years of study.
BIOL-301
1 - 4 Credits
This course allows students to assist in a class or laboratory for which they have previously earned credit. The student will assist the instructor in the operation of the course. Assistance by the student may include fielding questions, helping in workshops, and assisting in review sessions. In the case of labs, students may also be asked to help with supervising safety practices, waste manifestation, and instrumentation.
BIOL-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
BIOL-295
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their first three years of study.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Hellman, Kelly, et al. "Estimating the Economic Impact of Stormwater Runoff in the Allen Creek Watershed." Ecological Economics 145. (2018): 420-429. Web.
Korfmacher, Karl, J. Scott Hawker, and James Winebrake. "Transportation Activities Associated with High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Operations in the Marcellus Shale Formation." Transportation Research Record 2503. (2015): 70-80. Print.
Brister, Evelyn, Elizabeth Hane, and Karl Korfmacher. "Visualizing Plant Community Change Using Historical Records." International Journal of Applied Geospatial Research 2. 4 (2011): 1-18. Print.
Published Conference Proceedings
Korfmacher, Karl, Scott Hawker, and James Winebrake. "Analysis of Environmental and Infrastructure Impacts of Transportation Activities Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Operations in the Marcellus Shale Formation." Proceedings of the Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, January 13, 2015, Washington DC. Ed. National Academy of Sciences. Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences, Web.
Published Article
Comer, B., J.J. Corbett, J.S. Hawker, K. Korfmacher, E.E. Lee, C. Prokop, et al. “Marine Vessels as Substitutesfor Heavy-Duty Trucks in Great Lakes Freight Transportation.” Journal of the Airand Waste Management Association, 60.7 (2010): 7. Print. † ≠ ^
Formal Presentation
Hawker, J. S., B. Comer, J.J. Corbett, A. Ghosh, K. Korfmacher,E. E. Lee, et al. “An Integrated Model toStudy Environmental, Economic, and Energy Trade-Offs in Intermodal FreightTransportation.” International EnvironmentalModelling and Software Society (iEMSs) International Congress. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. 5-8 July 2010. Presentation. †