Kaitlin Stack Whitney Headshot

Kaitlin Stack Whitney

Assistant Professor
Department of Science, Technology, and Society
College of Liberal Arts
Extended Faculty Member

585-475-6604
Office Hours
Fall 2019 Wednesdays 1-3pm
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
Eastman 1354, 7 Lomb Memorial Drive Rochester, NY 14623

Kaitlin Stack Whitney

Assistant Professor
Department of Science, Technology, and Society
College of Liberal Arts
Extended Faculty Member

Education

BS, Cornell University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison

Bio

Dr. Stack Whitney (she/her) is an assistant professor in the Science & Technology Studies department in the College of Liberal Arts. She leads the SWEET Collaborative (the Stack / Whitney Col(lab)orative of Entomology, Environment, and Technology), working with RIT undergraduate and graduate student collaborators, RIT faculty, as well as faculty and students at other universities and non-academics across North America. She is committed to participatory, intersectional, and feminist approaches to pressing environmental questions.

Her research is at the intersection of policy, animal studies, and ecosystem services - often, but not always, with insects as focal organisms. She uses a range of tools, ranging from museum specimens to observational fieldwork to coding big data. These approaches include methods from science (ecology and ecoinformatics) and science studies (feminist biology and modern environmental history).

Before coming to RIT, Dr. Stack Whitney worked for the nonprofit CNFA on the US Department of Agriculture's Farmer to Farmer Program in Eastern Europe and Washington DC, as well as the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of International & Tribal Affairs and Office of Pesticide Programs.

Dr. Stack Whitney has a professional and personal commitment to inclusive and accessible pedagogy, research, and outreach for learners of all ages. She works on issues of "open" scholarship - including researching and writing on ethical and institutional barriers to openness. She lives in a bilingual ASL/English household and continues to take ASL courses through NTID. 

585-475-6604

Personal Links
Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

ENVS-201
3 Credits
This workshop serves as the second core course for the Environmental Science major. Through in-class exercises, outside labs, and field trips, students will begin to learn problem solving and analytical skills needed to investigate and address environmental issues. Topics may include assessing campus biodiversity and ecosystems, calculating personal and campus ecological footprints and sustainability indexes, environmental modeling, and campus sustainability projects. To demonstrate the interdisciplinary methodology of environmental science, elements of government/political science/policy, ethics, economics, sociology, and history are embedded in the scientific matrix used to present this course.
ENVS-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
BIOL-495
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed student project or research involving laboratory or field work, computer modeling, or theoretical calculations that could be considered of an original nature. The level of study is appropriate for students in their final two years of study.
STSO-421
3 Credits
This course introduces students to federal, state, and local environmental policies and the various policy paths leading to their establishment. Students will understand how societal values inform the content of environmental policies and the impacts, in turn, of these policies on society. In addition, the class will explore how environmental economics informs the new tools of environmental policy. The course covers a range of environmental policies at the U.S. and international levels addressing problems such as air and water pollution, climate change, energy use, and community sustainability.
BIOL-675
3 Credits
This course focuses on the application of ecological principles to conservation issues. Human impact on species diversity will be emphasized as it relates to agricultural, forest, coastal and wetland ecosystems. Case studies of management practices used to manage and restore disturbed ecosystems will be included. Students will explore a topic in depth through writing a review paper of published literature.
STSO-220
3 Credits
This course introduces the interdisciplinary foundations of environmental science via an analysis of sustainability within a socio-cultural context. This is a required course for the environmental science degree program.
STSO-521
3 Credits
This course explores the problems, issues, and values stemming from the current massive loss of biodiversity. Various justifications for preserving or conserving biodiversity will be examined. Although principals of conservation biology are presented, the social/cultural dimensions of the issue will be emphasized.
BIOL-475
3 Credits
This course focuses on the application of ecological principles to conservation issues. Human impact on species diversity is emphasized as it relates to agricultural, forest, coastal and wetland ecosystems. Case studies of management practices used to manage and restore disturbed ecosystems are included.
ENVS-298
1 - 4 Credits
This course is a faculty-directed tutorial of appropriate topics that are not part of the formal curriculum. The level of study is appropriate for student in their first three years of study.
STSO-422
3 Credits
This course utilizes the Great Lakes Basin as an integrating context for understanding global environmental issues. Examining the basin through an interdisciplinary environmental lens the class applies social science approaches to environmental problem solving. Students assess the local, regional, national and international scope of Great Lakes environmental issues through lecture, role-play, and field experiences and consider the importance of government action, public policy, ethics, economics, sociology, history, and engineering while applying social science analysis skills such as surveys, interviews, and content analysis to better understand the depth of local environmental problems and their potential solutions. Environmental science majors prepare a proposal for an environmental consulting project.
ENVS-790
1 - 4 Credits
The thesis option will be available to environmental science graduate students only with prior written approval of program faculty. Students will submit a proposal to a faculty member who agrees to serve as the student's thesis committee chair. The proposal will describe the basic research question to be investigated and the experimental protocols to be employed. Proposals will be reviewed by the program faculty who will give permission to register for thesis credit. This course may be taken several times over the course of a student's graduate program, for variable credits. A written thesis and oral defense are required at the completion of the thesis research.

Latest News

Select Scholarship

Invited Article/Publication
Whitney, Christie A Bahlai, Lewis J Bartlett, Kevin R Burgio, Auriel MV Fournier, Carl N Keiser, Timothee Poisot, Kaitlin Stack. "Open Science Isn't Always Open to All Scientists: Current efforts to make research more accessible and transparent can reinforce inequality within STEM professions." American Scientist. (2019). Print.
Journal Paper
Schlager, Samuel C Zipper, Kaitlin Stack Whitney, Jillian M Deines, Kevin M Befus, Udit Bhatia, Sam J Albers, Janice Beecher, Christa Brelsford, Margaret Garcia, Tom Gleeson, Frances O’Donnell, David Resnik, Edella. "Balancing Open Science and Data Privacy in the Water Sciences." Water Resources Research 55. 7 (2019): 5202-5211. Print.
Whitney, Evan Morrison, Alexandra Shipman, Shradha Shrestha, Evan Squier, Kaitlin Stack. "Evaluating The Ocean Cleanup, a Marine Debris Removal Project in the North Pacific Gyre, Using SWOT Analysis." Case Studies in the Environment. (2019): N/A. Web.
Karp, Daniel S, et al. "Crop Pests and Predators Exhibit Inconsistent responses to Surrounding Landscape Composition." Proceeedings of the National Academy of Sciences 115. 33 (2018): E7863-E7870. Web.
Whitney, Kaitlin Stack and Kristoffer Whitney. "John Anthony Allan’s “Virtual Water”: Natural Resources Management in the Wake of Neoliberalism." Arcadia 11. (2018): doi.org/10.5282/rcc/8316. Web.
Whitney, Kaitlin Stack, Simon J Goring, and Aerin Jacob. "Accessibility is Imperative for Inclusion." Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 16. 2 (2018): 63-63. Print.
Whitney, Kaitlin Stack, Simon J Goring, and Aerin Jacob. "Making Scientific Content More Accessible." Authorea. (2018): doi.org/10.22541/au.150844289.92609826. Web.
Book Chapter
Nelson, Nicole and Kaitlin Stack Whitney. "Becoming a Research Rodent." Living with Animals: Bonds Across Species. Ed. Ilana Gershon and Natalie Porter. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2018. 199-208. Print.