Divya Ramjee Headshot

Divya Ramjee

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

Office Location

Divya Ramjee

Assistant Professor

Department of Public Policy
College of Liberal Arts

Currently Teaching

CRIM-110
3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to criminal justice. One of the primary goals of this course is to provide a general understanding of how the criminal justice system responds to crime in society. The main component parts of the criminal justice system (i.e., police, courts, and corrections) will be examined with a particular emphasis on developing an understanding of the behavior and interactions among the main actors in the criminal justice system. To accomplish this goal, we will examine how criminal cases are processed in the criminal justice system. We will also consider how external forces, such as political decisions, public opinion, and the media influence criminal justice decision-making. Students will also formulate, argue, and evaluate ethical perspectives regarding criminal justice systems, individual-level decisions, and recognize relationships with other ethical problems in society. Finally, throughout the course we will emphasize how the societal response to crime has evolved over time.
CRIM-210
3 Credits
Develops understanding of theories, management processes, organizational capabilities and social implications of criminal justice technologies. Many categories of technology are considered, ranging from communications and records management, to special assault and protection tactics. Students consider the role of industry, government, and user groups in the historical development and legal/ethical use of specific technologies.
CRIM-290
3 Credits
This course provides definitional, theoretical, and operational context for understanding computer-based competition, conflict and crime in the information age. Students study the history, nature and extent of computer-related crime, as well as differing types of computer criminals, their motivations and the methods they use to threaten, attack, compromise or damage physical, and cyber assets. The course considers legal and regulatory environments and the impact these have on policies and practices related to ethics in the management of information security, data encryption, privacy, and numerous other special topics.
CRIM-489
3 Credits
Focuses on contemporary issues and topics not otherwise distinctly incorporated in established criminal justice courses. Concentrates on student discussion and interaction surrounding required readings on topics such as crime prevention and issues in the prosecution/court system. Recent examples include cyberlaw, prisoner re-entry restorative justice, wrongful convictions, crime mapping, crime analysis, non-traditional courts, legal controversies in the law, substance abuse, and legal research.