Dan Phillips Headshot

Dan Phillips

Associate Professor

Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering
Effective Access Technology

585-475-2309
Office Location

Dan Phillips

Associate Professor

Department of Electrical and Microelectronic Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering
Effective Access Technology

Education

BS, State University of New York at Buffalo; MS, Ph.D., University of Rochester

585-475-2309

Personal Links

Currently Teaching

EEEE-105
1 Credits
EE Practicum provides an introduction to the practice of electrical engineering including understanding laboratory practice, identifying electronic components, operating electronic test and measurement instruments, prototyping electronic circuits, and generating and analyzing waveforms. Laboratory exercises introduce the student to new devices or technologies and an associated application or measurement technique. This hands-on lab course emphasizes experiential learning to introduce the student to electrical engineering design practices and tools used throughout the undergraduate electrical engineering program and their professional career. Laboratory exercises are conducted individually by students using their own breadboard and components in a test and measurement laboratory setting. Measurements and observations from the laboratory exercises are recorded and presented by the student to a lab instructor or teaching assistant. Documented results are uploaded for assessment.
EEEE-531
3 Credits
Biological entities represent one of the most difficult environments in which to obtain or generate accurate and reliable signals. This course will discuss the techniques, mechanisms and methods necessary to transfer accurate and reliable information or signals with a biological target. Various biomedical sensor and transducer types including their characteristics, advantages, disadvantages and signal conditioning will be covered. Discussions will include the challenges associated with providing a reliable and reproducible interface to a biological entity, the nature and characteristics of the associated signals, the types of applicable sensors and transducers and the circuitry necessary to drive them.
EEEE-631
3 Credits
Biological entities represent one of the most difficult environments in which to obtain or generate accurate and reliable signals. This course will discuss the techniques, mechanisms and methods necessary to transfer accurate and reliable information or signals with a biological target. Various biomedical sensor and transducer types including their characteristics, advantages, disadvantages and signal conditioning will be covered. Discussions will include the challenges associated with providing a reliable and reproducible interface to a biological entity, the nature and characteristics of the associated signals, the types of applicable sensors and transducers and the circuitry necessary to drive them.
EEEE-533
3 Credits
Discussion and study of the methods and techniques that may be optimally employed for the fixed and adaptive processing of information with biological and physiological origin. The challenges and unique features of these types of signals will be discussed and application of known signal processing techniques that accommodate linear, non-linear and stochastic signals for the purpose of analysis, detection and estimation, monitoring and control will be studied. Successful participation in the course will entail completion of a project involving incorporation of these techniques in a biomedical application.

In the News

  • March 18, 2020

    students demonstrating accessible, modular kitchen design.

    Students combine technology and design to help others

    The LiveAbility Lab is a partnership between RIT and the Al Sigl Community of Agencies, a collaborative network of organizations in Rochester that serves children and adults with special needs. The lab, which is located on Al Sigl’s Wolk Campus, opened in 2018. The goal is to develop a pipeline of accessible technology projects that are conceived at RIT and take root at the LiveAbility Lab on their way to development in the marketplace. 

  • February 25, 2020

    students demonstrating mobile kitchen project.

    POSTPONED: RIT hosts Conference on Effective Access Technology March 17

    From furniture and toys that assist children with special needs to car seats that help people with mobility issues enter and exit vehicles safely, cutting-edge technologies designed to enhance accessibility for individuals across a wide range of physical and cognitive challenges will be on display March 17 at the fifth Conference on Effective Access Technology.