Michael Schertzer Headshot

Michael Schertzer

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-5715
Office Location

Michael Schertzer

Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

B.Eng.Mgt., M.A.Sc, McMaster University (Canada); Ph.D., University of Toronto (Canada)

Bio

Dr. Schertzer is primarily interested in droplet based microfluidic technologies for applications in point of care medical diagnostics, multiphase heat transfer and energy generation. His contributions to these areas have focused on developing a deeper fundamental and practical understanding of fluid mechanics and heat transfer as well as the development of novel techniques for sensing and control in microfluidic devices. As a result of this work he is also developed a practical understanding of several microfabrication techniques.

Dr. Schertzer received the Bachelor of Engineering and Management (a double major in Mechanical and Commerce) from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. He also received a Master of Applied Science from McMaster University for his work examining the heat transfer performance of capillary pumped loops in terrestrial and extra-terrestrial applications. He earned his Doctorate in the Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering from the University of Toronto for his work characterizing the motion and mixing of droplets in Digital Microfluidic Devices. He continued this work as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Toronto where he focused on the design and commercialization of a point of care Digital Microfluidic device. Dr. Schertzer has published his research in high impact journals including Langmuir, Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, the Journal of Microelectromechanical Systems, and the International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. In addition to academic research, Dr. Schertzer has had the opportunity to consult and collaborate with industrial partners in the areas of point of care medical diagnostics, public health and power generation.

To learn more about Dr. Schertzer, see his personal website and visit his lab website.

585-475-5715

Currently Teaching

MECE-110
3 Credits
A basic course introducing the classical theory of thermodynamics. Applications of the first law of thermodynamics are used to introduce the student to thermodynamic processes for closed and open systems. The Clausius and Kelvin-Planck statements of the second law are then correlated with the concept of entropy and enthalpy to investigate both real and reversible processes and the thermodynamic properties of pure substances. These techniques are then used to evaluate thermodynamic cycles for a variety of applications in power generation and refrigeration. Students are then introduced to techniques to imporove thermal efficiency of these cycles such as reheat, regeneration, and co-generation.
MECE-795
0 - 2 Credits
This seminar course presents topics of contemporary interest to graduate students enrolled in the program. Presentations include off campus speakers, and assistance with progressing on your research. Selected students and faculty may make presentations on current research under way in the department. All graduate students enrolled full time (whether dual degree or single degree) are required to attend a designated number of seminars.
MECE-310
3 Credits
A first course in the fundamentals of heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, together with applications to typical engineering systems. Topics include one- and two-dimensional steady state and transient heat conduction, radiation exchange between black and gray surfaces, correlation equations for laminar/turbulent internal and external convection, and an introduction to heat exchangers analysis and design by LMTD and NTU methods.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Bernetski, Kimberly A., et al. "Characterization of Electrowetting, Contact Angle Hysteresis, and Adhesion on Digital Microfluidic Devices with Inkjet-printed Electrodes." Microfluidics and Nanofluidics 22. 96 (2018): https://doi.org/10.1007/s10404-018-2119-4. Print.
Schertzer, Michael J. and Patricia Iglesias. "Meta-Analysis ComparingWettability Parameters and the Effect ofWettability on Friction Coefficient in Lubrication." Lubricants 6. 3 (2018): 1-10. Web.
Kudtarkar, Kaushik, et al. "Effect of Metallization on the Electromechanical Properties of Microfluidically Synthesized Hydrogel Beads." ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering 141. 3 (2018): 1-6. Print.
Matczak, Lea, et al. "Effect of Cation Nature on the Lubricating and Physicochemical Properties of Three Ionic Liquids." Tribology International 124. (2018): 23-33. Print.
Kudtarkar, Kaushik, et al. "Effects of Chemical Composition on the Electromechanical Properties of Microfluidically Synthesized Hydrogel Beads." ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering 140. 10 (2018): 1-6. Print.
Published Conference Proceedings
Li, Xi, Kara L. Maki, and Michael J. Schertzer. "Preliminary Investigation of the Effect Of Dielectrophoresis on Colloidal Transport and Deposition in Evaporating Droplets." Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference & Exposition. Ed. ASME. Pittsburgh, PA: n.p., 2018. Web.
Schertzer, Michael J., et al. "Characterization of Bead Based Chemical Reactions and Supernatant Dillution in Digital Microfluidic Devices." Proceedings of the 2nd Middle East Conference on Biomedical Engineering. Ed. Reza Tafreshi, Texas A&M University at Qatar. Doha, Qatar, NA: n.p., 2014. Web.
Schertzer, Michael J., et al. "Enhancement of the Engineering Measurements Laboratory for Semester Conversion." Proceedings of the ASEE National Conference 2014. Ed. Mark Matthews. Indianapolis, IN: n.p., 2014. Web.
Robinson, Risa, et al. "Understanding The Causes For Low Student Office Hour Attendance." Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition. Ed. Assimina Pelegri. Montreal, QC: n.p., 2014. Web.
Schertzer, Michael J., et al. "Effect of Office Hour Participation on Student Performance." Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition. Ed. Assimina Pelegri. Montreal, QC: n.p., 2014. Web.
Blume, Steffen, et al. "Analytical Models to Determine the Electric Field Characteristic of a Multi-Electrode Impedimetric Immunosensor in a Digital Microfluidic Device." Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition. Ed. Assimina Pelegri. Montreal, QC: n.p., 2014. Web.
Dunning, Peter D., Pierre E. Sullivan, and Michael J. Schertzer. "Method for Characterization of Passive Mechanical Filtration of Particles in Digital Microfluidic Devices." Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition. Ed. Assimina Pelegri. Montreal, QC: n.p., 2014. Web.
Schertzer, Michael J., et al. "Effect of surface modification on protein deposition in desiccated droplets." Proceedings of the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition. Ed. Assimina Pelegri. Montreal, QC: n.p., 2014. Web.
Schertzer, Michael J., et al. "Method for Individual Control of Multiplexed Droplet Generation in Digital Microfluidic Devices." Proceedings of the International Mechanical Engineering Conference and Exposition, 2013 San Diego, CA. Ed. Mina Pelegri and George Kardomateas. San Diego, CA: ASME, 2013. Print.