Michael Richards Headshot

Michael Richards

Assistant Professor

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

585-475-4397
Office Location

Michael Richards

Assistant Professor

Department of Biomedical Engineering
Kate Gleason College of Engineering

Education

BS, University of Rochester; Ph.D., Boston University

Bio

<p>Dr. Richards received his Bachelor of Science with in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Rochester followed by a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Boston University. His postdoctoral&nbsp;training was completed in the Department of Radiology, Basic Radiological Sciences Division at the University of Michigan and at the University of Rochester, Department of Electrical and Computer&nbsp;Engineering. Currently, he is an Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology and an Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Surgery the University of&nbsp;Rochester Medical Center. His research interests focus on the biomechanics of soft tissues and measuring the changes in mechanical properties of diseased tissues using clinical imaging modalities. His research is focused on the development, validation and implementation of elasticity imaging, or elastography, for applications to a wide variety of pathologies, including the diagnosis and monitoring of vascular diseases, assessment of musculoskeletal disorder severity and guiding strategies for physical therapy and breast cancer diagnosis. Elasticity imaging is a technique that&nbsp;offers the ability to provide physicians with entirely new, noninvasive diagnostic information (e.g.&nbsp;tissue mechanical properties and states) using established medical imaging techniques such as clinical ultrasound.&nbsp;</p>

585-475-4397

Personal Links

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Jadamba, Baasansuren, et al. "A Convex Inversion Framework for Identifying Parameters in Saddle Point Problems with Applications to Inverse Incompressible Elasticity." Inverse Problems 36. 7 (2020): 74003. Print.
Jadamba, Baasansuren, et al. "Analyzing the Role of the Inf-Sup Condition for Parameter Identification in Saddle Point problems with Application in Elasticity Imaging." Optimization 69. 12 (2020): 2577-2610. Print.
Kotelsky, Alexander, et al. "Evidence that Reduction in Volume Protects in Situ Articular Chondrocytes from Mechanical Impact." Connective Tissue Research. (2020): 1-15. Print.
Ackerman, Jessica E., et al. "Nonā€Invasive Ultrasound Quantification of Scar Tissue Volume Identifies Early Functional Changes During Tendon Healing." Journal of Orthopaedic Research 11. (2019): 2476-2485. Print.
Mix, Doran, et al. "Manufacturing Abdominal Aorta Hydrogel Tissue-Mimicking Phantoms for Ultrasound Elastography Validation." Journal of Visualized Experiements. 139 (2018): NA. Web.
Invited Keynote/Presentation
Mix, Doran, et al. "Comparison of Elastic Modulus Inverse Estimation and the Pulse Wave Velocity Estimation for Monitoring Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms." 177th Meeting: Acoustical Society of America. Acoustical Society of America. Louisville, KY. 16 May 2019. Conference Presentation.
Chimenti, Ruth, et al. "Ultrasound Strain Mapping For Measuring Tendon Compression in Patients with Tendinopathy." 16th International Symposium on Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering. Columbia University. New York, NY. 14 Aug. 2019. Conference Presentation.
Myers, Marlin, Alayna Loiselle, and Michael Richards. "Longitudinal Non-Invasive Ultrasonography to Measure Tensile Mechanical Properties in Tendon Healing." Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Biomedical Engineering Society. Philadelphia, PA. 6 Oct. 2019. Conference Presentation.
Aggouras, Anthony, et al. "Tendon Thickness and Impingement in Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy and the Influence of Exercise." Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting. Biomedical Engineering Society. Philadelphia, PA. 6 Oct. 2019. Conference Presentation.
Published Conference Proceedings
Jalalahmadi, Golnaz, et al. "(Peak) Wall Stress As An Indicator Of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Severity." Proceedings of the IEEE Western New York Image and Signal Processing Workshop. Ed. . Rochester, New York: n.p., 2018. Print.
Kelly, Meghan, et al. "Novel Physical Therapy Protocol Targeting Insertional Achilles Tendinopathy Improves Patient Reported Outcomes that Persist For 1 Year." Proceedings of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society Annual Meeting. Ed. . Rosemont, IL: n.p., 2018. Print.

Currently Teaching

BIME-499
0 Credits
One semester of paid work experience in biomedical engineering.
BIME-491
1 Credits
Laboratory experiments are conducted to explore and reinforce fundamental principles and concepts introduced in BIME-410 (Systems Physiology I) and BIME-440 (Biomedical Signals and Analysis). The experimental procedures involve measuring results, analyzing and interpreting data and drawing objective conclusions. Emphasis is also placed on proper documentation and effective presentation of findings and results. Laboratory experiments will be conducted to investigate pressure, volume and flow relationships of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems including the inherent variability and dynamic response to perturbations. Signal processing methods will be utilized to address ubiquitous artifacts found in measured physiological signals.
BIME-560
3 Credits
This introductory course is aimed to cover the physics and math underlying the main medical imaging systems: computed tomography (CT) X-Ray, Ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Nuclear Medicine both positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The course will cover how signals from these systems are formed and then used to create images of various organs/tissues in vivo. Through examples of biomedical applications, students will learn how images from each modality are used for diagnostic and research purposes. Concepts, such as Fourier Transform, Convolution, Smoothing, Signal-to-noise (SNR), spatial and temporal resolution, will be covered in the context of biomedical applications. While various organs will be covered, the main focus of the course will be neuroscience applications, particularly brain imaging and human brain mapping.
BIME-410
3 Credits
This course begins a two-course sequence designed to provide students with a broad foundational understanding of physiological mechanisms from a systems perspective. This first course in the sequence is concerned with the fundamental aspects of cellular function including maintenance of homeostasis, molecular transport, and cellular signaling. The course covers the basics of electrophysiology, electrically excitable cells and tissue, the operation of the nervous system including the central, peripheral, somatic and autonomic systems, the special senses and the connection between the nervous system and the endocrine system. Differences and relationships between speed, specificity and sensitivity of signaling mechanism of the nervous system and the endocrine system will be discussed. Students will also be introduced to the basic principles of biomedical instrumentation used in cellular physiology research.