Research News

  • August 28, 2020

    world map showing where gas hydrates have been discovered.

    Team develops model to determine stability of gas hydrates

    Natural gas-hydrates—crystalline compounds of gas molecules—are found in permafrost and marine sediments. While these gas hydrates can be used as alternative energy resources, they also pose a danger in terms of global warming. RIT researchers Patricia Taboada-Serrano and Yali Zhang developed a comprehensive model to better validate location of gas-hydrate deposits in marine sediments.

  • July 23, 2020

    researcher wearing face mask in lab.

    Working together, but safely distant, in RIT’s research labs

    Several RIT research labs are ramping up work after several months of down time due to COVID-19. With the approval to reopen and prepare for fall classes, faculty-researchers have put in place some of the recommended guidelines for lab usage—from occupancy to cleaning protocols.

  • July 16, 2020

    two students looking at specimen.

    The advantages of working differently

    RIT Ph.D. candidate Mehdi (Aslan) Dehghani secured an internship at bio-device company after his team's research paper was published nationally.

  • May 28, 2020

    Nathaniel Barlow and Steve Weinstein.

    RIT scientists develop method to help epidemiologists map spread of COVID-19

    Nathaniel Barlow, associate professor in RIT’s School of Mathematical Sciences, and Steven Weinstein, head of RIT’s Department of Chemical Engineering, outline a solution to the SIR epidemic model, which is commonly used to predict how many people are susceptible to, infected by, and recovered from viral epidemics, in a study published in Physica D: Nonlinear Phenomena.

  • May 26, 2020

    four researchers collecting sediment samples from a lake.

    RIT researchers receive grant to study microplastic pollution in Lake Ontario

    A team of RIT researchers will explore how tiny particles of plastic pollution are impacting Lake Ontario thanks to new funding from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The multidisciplinary group will examine how microplastics are transported and transformed in the lake, where they ultimately end up and what effects they have on the ecosystem.

  • May 8, 2020

    Manuela Campanelli, Satish Kandlikar, and James Perkins

    RIT Honors Distinguished Faculty Awardees for 2020

    RIT honored its 2020 class of Distinguished Faculty—Manuela Campanelli, Satish Kandlikar and James Perkins. The Distinguished Professor designation is given to tenured faculty who have shown continued excellence over their careers in teaching, scholarly contributions, lasting contributions in creative and professional work and service to both the university and community.

  • May 4, 2020

    four female engineering Ph.D. students.

    RIT doctoral students set to contribute to health care, imaging and space fields

    Alyssa Owens is contributing new ways to diagnose breast cancer and Poornima Kalyanram has discovered how fluorescent molecules might help to identify diseased cells. Karen Soule and Fatemeh Shah-Mohammadi are part of breakthrough work in developing carbon nanotubes and cognitive radio networks—advances in technology that will power tomorrow’s electronic devices. All four are on track to graduate with a Ph.D. in engineering.

  • April 15, 2020

    An enlarged image of the different bioparticles found in a specimen.

    RIT researchers build micro-device to detect bacteria, viruses

    Ke Du and Blanca Lapizco-Encinas, both faculty-researchers in RIT’s Kate Gleason College of Engineering, worked with an international team to collaborate on the design of a next-generation miniature lab device that uses magnetic nano-beads to isolate minute bacterial particles that cause diseases. This new technology improves how clinicians isolate drug-resistant strains of bacterial infections and difficult-to-detect micro-particles such as those making up Ebola and coronaviruses.

  • March 31, 2020

    four researchers looking at computer that's analyzing a quantum photonics wafer.

    Making a quantum leap

    Researchers from RIT’s Future Photon Initiative, in collaboration with the Air Force Research Laboratory, have produced the Department of Defense’s first-ever fully integrated quantum photonics wafer.