Beth Carle Headshot

Beth Carle

Professor
Department of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology
College of Engineering Technology

585-475-6752
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
70-1309

Beth Carle

Professor
Department of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering Technology
College of Engineering Technology

Education

BSE, University of Pittsburgh; MS, Ph.D., University of Illinois; EIT Professional Certification

585-475-6752

Personal Links

Currently Teaching

MCET-111
1 Credits
This lab class accompanies MCET-110 Foundations of Materials. An emphasis is placed on determining material, primarily metals, properties though experimentation and references, and analyzing why a particular material was selected for an application based on the materials properties. Differentiation of materials families is made based on properties. A variety of discovery activities are used to explore the world of metals, including labs of various types, materials selection software, and internet resources.
MCET-499
0 Credits
One semester of appropriate work experience in industry. Department permission is required.
MFET-499
0 Credits
One semester of experience in a job related to the student's major. Completion of Co-op Orientation required before registering for co-op. Department permission is required.
MCET-550
3 Credits
All machines are comprised of individual components (springs, gears, fasteners, etc.) working together as a system to accomplish a goal. This course integrates the components into the bigger picture of the system. The course culminates in the design and production of a machine.
EMET-499
0 Credits
EMET Co-op. Department permission is required.
MFET-797
3 Credits
This course provides the MMSI graduate students an opportunity to complete their degree requirements by addressing a practical real-world challenge using the knowledge and skills acquired throughout their studies. This course is not only the culmination of a student's course work but also an indicator of the student's ability to use diverse knowledge to provide a tangible solution to a problem. The capstone project topic can be in the areas of product development, manufacturing automation, management system, quality management or electronics packaging. The course requires a comprehensive project report and a final presentation.
MCET-450
3 Credits
In this course students will investigate how mechanical parts fail through static, fatigue, and surface modes. Students will analyze the stresses, apply failure theories, and design mechanical components to last. The fatigue characteristics for given metal samples will be investigated through experimentation, analysis, and deduction of experimental results. The computer is used extensively in analysis, FEA, and design process.
MFET-790
3 Credits
The MMSI thesis is based on thorough literature review and experimental substantiation of a problem, by the candidate, in an appropriate topic. A written proposal has to be defended and authorized by the faculty adviser/committee. The proposal defense is followed by experimental work, a formal written thesis, and oral presentation of findings. The candidate should have completed the requisite courses for the program before enrolling for the thesis.
MCET-551
1 Credits
This course will allow students to demonstrate and develop the skills and knowledge gained in the MCET-550 Mechanical Analysis and Design II course. This will be done through the integration of course topics into lab projects. These labs will allow students to analyze and design mechanical systems that include gears, springs, shafts, bearings, and other forms of power transmission. The lab will be split between in class discussions and hands-on learning opportunities. In class discussions will outline lab requirements and relate the lab-to-course material. Lab reports are generated through the integration of word processing and presentation software. The application of software tools and the engineering design process will be emphasized throughout.

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Carle, Beth. "Nuclear Meltdown in Fukushima: Human Accident or Natural Disaster?" National Center for Case Study Teaching in Science. (2015): 1-21. Web.