Gregory Howland Headshot

Gregory Howland

Assistant Professor
School of Physics and Astronomy
College of Science

Gregory Howland

Assistant Professor
School of Physics and Astronomy
College of Science


Areas of Expertise

Currently Teaching

PHYS-414
3 Credits
This course is a study of the concepts and mathematical structure of non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Topics for the course include wave functions and the Schrodinger equation, solutions to the one-dimensional and three-dimensional time-independent Schrodinger equation, stationary states and their superposition to produce time-dependent states, quantum-mechanical operators, commutators, and uncertainty principles, solutions to general central potential problems and the hydrogen atom, and the quantum theory of angular momentum.
PHYS-415
3 Credits
This course is a continued study of the concepts and mathematical structure of quantum mechanics presented in Quantum Mechanics (PHYS-414), with an emphasis on applications to real physical systems. Topics covered include the quantum theory of spin, effect of magnetic fields on spin-1/2 particles, many-particle systems, variational principle, time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, absorption and emission of radiation by atoms, quantum theory of scattering, and interpretations and paradoxes of quantum mechanics.

Latest News

  • August 27, 2019

    Structure of balls and pins.

    A practical method to measure quantum entanglement

    Tech Explorist reports on a new technique by RIT researchers for quantifying entanglement that has major implications for developing the next generation of technology in computing, simulation, secure communication and other fields.

  • August 23, 2019

    Three researchers discuss quantum entanglement.

    RIT researchers help develop practical new method for measuring quantum entanglement

    Researchers have helped develop a new technique for quantifying entanglement that has major implications for developing the next generation of technology in computing, simulation, secure communication and other fields. The researchers outlined their new method for measuring entanglement in a recent Nature Communications article.