News
Michael Zemcov

  • July 27, 2021

    students and professor working at a computer station.

    Student team designs imaging system for CIBER-2 launches

    Two electrical engineering students are refining an attitude control system and are seeking ways to reduce the impact of atmospheric heat that changes a spacecraft’s orientation during launch. Both students will share information about their work for CSTARS-2 during the 2021 Undergraduate Research Symposium.

  • June 17, 2021

    researcher making adjustments to a rocket.

    CIBER-2 experiment successfully completes first flight

    Led by principal investigator Michael Zemcov, an assistant professor in RIT’s School of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Detectors, the experiment aims to better understand extragalactic background light, which traces the history of galaxies back to the formation of the first stars in the universe.

  • January 6, 2021

    illustration of telescope in space.

    RIT’s Michael Zemcov helping to push new NASA space telescope toward launch

    Michael Zemcov, assistant professor in the School of Physics and Astronomy, is part of the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization and Ices Explorer (SPHEREx) mission, which will let scientists learn about the formation of galaxies and search for life-sustaining molecules in the clouds of material where stars and planets form.

  • November 18, 2019

    Two researchers wearing cleansuits work on detector equipment.

    Researchers prepare rocket for launch

    A team of RIT researchers is helping launch an experiment above the atmosphere to better understand extragalactic background light, which traces the history of galaxies back to the formation of the first stars in the universe.

  • September 12, 2019

    Quanta Image Sensor (QIS) semiconductor chip.

    Scientists developing single photon detector to help search for habitable exoplanets

    NASA is awarding a team of researchers from RIT and Dartmouth College a grant to develop a detector capable of sensing and counting single photons that could be crucial to future NASA astrophysics missions. The extremely sensitive detector would allow scientists to see the faintest observable objects in space, such as Earth-like planets around other stars.

  • April 23, 2019

    Researchers stand in front of gigantic observatory.

    RIT researchers help conduct experiment to study how the first stars and galaxies formed

    While many people flock to warm destinations for spring break, two RIT experimental cosmologists spent theirs 6,800 feet high on snow-covered Kitt Peak at the Arizona Radio Observatory. They were deploying an instrument to a 12-meter telescope for a project called the Tomographic Ionized-carbon Mapping Experiment (TIME), which aims to study the universe’s first stars and galaxies.