Georgia Gosnell Seminar Series

The Georgia Gosnell Seminar Series showcases speakers with broad expertise across the life sciences. Presentations feature ongoing research at the forefront of academia, industry, and government. Topics include ecological sustainability, education, evolution, genomics, pathogenesis, proteomics, and viral therapeutics.

Join us Wednesdays from 1-1:50 pm in GOS A-300. All are welcome! 

This seminar series honors the legacy of Georgia Potter Gosnell (1930-2014), a generous supporter of the school and influential environmental activist of Rochester.

Upcoming Seminar

September 21: Stefan Schulze, Assistant Professor

Time: 1:00 - 1:50 PM Eastern
Location: GOS A-300

Comprehensive prokaryotic glycoproteomics: challenges, solutions, and their application to pathogenic bacteria

headshot of Stefan Schulze

Speaker: Stefan Schulze, Assistant Professor
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, RIT

Abstract:
Protein glycosylation, one of the most complex post-translational modifications, plays central roles in a variety of cellular processes in prokaryotes. Therefore, system-wide analyses of glycoproteins are crucial to gain a molecular understanding of biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, and pathogenicity mechanisms. Yet the challenges posed by the complexity and variability of glycoproteins have prevented their large-scale analyses in most prokaryotes so far. Here, I will present an interdisciplinary approach that combines bioinformatics, comprehensive glycoproteomics, and cell biological characterizations for the functional analysis of prokaryotic glycosylation. For the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii, this approach led to the identification of the largest archaeal glycoproteome described as yet, revealed the concurrence of two independent N-glycosylation pathways that can modify the same glycosylation sites, and indicated the involvement of glycosylation in crucial cellular processes such as cell shape determination. The universal applicability of the developed methods and bioinformatic tools now sets the stage for functional glycoproteomics in bacteria. The first results highlight the importance of glycosylation for biofilm formation in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In summary, comprehensive prokaryotic glycoproteomics provides new insights into prokaryotic cell biology and, in turn, opens new avenues for developing novel therapeutics.

To request an interpreter, visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Future Seminars - Fall 2022

Time: 1:00 - 1:50 PM Eastern
Location: GOS A-300

headshots of six faculty members

Speaker: GSoLS Faculty Slide Slam
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, RIT

Abstract:
Join the Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences community to learn about faculty research and the opportunities for student research. Faculty will be presenting 5-minute summaries of their research.

To request an interpreter, visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Time: 1:00 - 1:50 PM Eastern
Location: GOS A-300

Trafficking of viral ribonucleoproteins in the cytoplasm of host cells

headshot of Douglas Lyles

Speaker: Douglas Lyles, Professor of Biochemistry
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Abstract:
The ribonucleoprotein (RNP) cores of RNA viruses are too large to diffuse through the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. Nonetheless, they migrate extensively post-infection to form inclusion bodies and migrate to the plasma membrane for virus assembly. We have shown that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) RNPs move through the cytoplasm primarily by rapidly bouncing back and forth within traps and hopping from trap to trap in random directions.

To request an interpreter, visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Time: 1:00 - 1:50 PM Eastern
Location: GOS A-300

Speaker: Dan Grunspan
The University of Guelph

Abstract:
More information to come!

To request an interpreter, visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Time: 1:00 - 1:50 PM Eastern
Location: GOS A-300

Speaker: Robert Gallagher
Prometheus Farms

Abstract:
More information to come!

To request an interpreter, visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Time: 1:00 - 1:50 PM Eastern
Location: Will be held on Zoom

Speaker: Shawn Fahl
Vice President of Lab Operations, Cell Services, and R&D, Discovery Life Sciences (2005 RIT Biotechnology Graduate)
2005 RIT Biotechnology Graduate

Abstract:
More information to come!

To request an interpreter, visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Time: 1:00 - 1:50 PM Eastern
Location: Will be held on Zoom

Speaker: Erik Dopman, Tufts University

Abstract:
More information to come!

To request an interpreter, visit myaccess.rit.edu.

Past Seminars - Fall 2022

Representations and Visualizations in Molecular Biology

headshot of Leslie Kate Wright

Speaker: Dr. Leslie Kate Wright
Professor and Interim Head of Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences

Abstract:
The field of Molecular Biology relies heavily on visual representations to communicate ideas about unobservable biological processes and molecules. Visual representations are simplified models that appear in biology textbooks, teaching materials, and even as quickly created drawings on paper or whiteboards during discussion. Much evidence suggests, however, that biology learners and experts do not necessarily “see” the same things when deciphering or creating visual representations. This seminar will highlight two recent projects from our laboratory; how visual representations are used to illustrate Molecular Biology concepts and how student-generated drawings can be a window into mental models of Molecular concepts and processes.

Impact of extraction methods, filter pore sizes, and primers on eDNA metabarcoding results

headshot of Dr. Girish Kumar

Speaker: Dr. Girish Kumar, Genomics Research Associate
Thomas H. Gosnell School of Life Sciences, RIT

Abstract:
Findings from environmental DNA (eDNA) metabarcoding are strongly influenced by the experimental approach. Yet, the effect of pre-PCR sample processing on taxon detection and estimates of biodiversity across different water types is still poorly resolved. In this presentation, I will discuss the impact of sampling effort, extraction method, filter pore size, and primers on metabarcoding results for fish in water samples.