RIT’s Rochester Science Café Welcomes Head of the International Astronomical Union

Robert Williams also to speak to Osher Lifelong Learning Institute




Follow Susan Gawlowicz on Twitter
Follow RITNEWS on Twitter

201004/hubble.jpg

Space Telescope Science Institute

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope sweeps around the Earth once every 97 minutes. This picture shows Hubble floating above Earth during a servicing mission 3B, March 2002.

Rochester’s Science Café will take an insider’s look through the Hubble Space Telescope during a talk by Robert Williams, head of the International Astronomical Union, the association that reclassified Pluto as a “dwarf planet” in 2006.

Williams, a distinguished research scholar and a former director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, will present “Our Spectacular Cosmos: How a Hubble Astronomer Looks at the Universe,” at 7 p.m. April 22 at the Pittsford Plaza Barnes & Noble’s Community Room. Rochester Science Café—sponsored by Rochester Institute of Technology and University of Rochester—is a series of free talks and discussions intended for a general audience.

While serving as director of the Space Telescope Science Institute, Williams influenced the science program and operation of the Hubble Space Telescope. The institute and Goddard Space Flight Center operate the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope for NASA.

In 1999, NASA awarded Williams the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal for his leadership of the Hubble Deep Field project. The two-week project, involving more than 50 scientists, revealed thousands of galaxies. Williams other research interests include novae, or exploding stars, spectroscopy and nebular gas clouds.

Williams will also present “The New Universe Revealed by the Hubble Space Telescope” at 2 p.m. April 23 at the RIT Inn & Conference Center as part of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute’s Arts and Letters program.

Scientist Robert Williams, head of the International Astronomical Union, will present:
• “Our Spectacular Cosmos: How a Hubble Astronomer Looks at the Universe,” 7 p.m. April 22 at the Pittsford Plaza Barnes and Noble’s Community Room, as part of the Rochester’s Science Café, sponsored by RIT;
• “The New Universe Revealed by the Hubble Space Telescope,” 2 p.m. April 23 at the RIT Inn & Conference Center, sponsored by the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute.

For more information, contact Josh Faber, coordinator of the Rochester’s Science Café, at jafsma@rit.edu or 475-5115.

201004/hubble.jpg

Space Telescope Science Institute

NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope sweeps around the Earth once every 97 minutes. This picture shows Hubble floating above Earth during a servicing mission 3B, March 2002.