Top Collegiate Computer Programmers Set to Compete at RIT Nov. 6

Northeast colleges and universities vie for a spot in world finals




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A. Sue Weisler

RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences will play host to the regional finals of the 2010 Association for Computing Machinery International Collegiate Programming Contest on Nov. 6.

Computer programming students from prestigious colleges and universities across the northeast region of the United States will gather at Rochester Institute of Technology Nov. 6. And they’ll be battling for the right to represent their school at the Association for Computing Machinery International Collegiate Programming Contest’s World Finals in Egypt.

Twelve universities will compete in the 2010 Northeast North America Regional Final, which is hosted by RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences. The competition kicks off at 9:45 a.m. in the Golisano Hall auditorium.

Each team will be asked to solve a list of complex real-world problems within a fixed time frame. Programming skills alone won’t be enough—the winner may be the team that can work together the best while facing adversity. The organizers design problems that force teams to work cohesively. The competition’s champion will automatically advance to the world finals. The second-place team potentially could qualify as a wildcard, depending on results from other regions across the country.

RIT and the University of Rochester join teams from Harvard, MIT, Acadia, Dalhousie, McGill, Middlebury, Saint Mary’s, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, University of Maine and the University of New Brunswick.

RIT comes into the competition with momentum, having defeated the University of Rochester and teams from Clarkson University, SUNY Brockport and SUNY Oswego in an earlier round of the competition.

201011/gccisweb.jpg

A. Sue Weisler

RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences will play host to the regional finals of the 2010 Association for Computing Machinery International Collegiate Programming Contest on Nov. 6.