Site-wide links

Microelectronics Manufacturing Engineering ME

Semester Requirements

Robert Pearson, Program Director
(585) 475-2923, repemc@rit.edu

http://www.rit.edu/kgcoe/program/microelectronic-engineering-1

Program overview

The master of engineering degree in microelectronics manufacturing engineering provides a broad-based education to students with a bachelor’s degree in traditional engineering or science disciplines who are interested in a career in the semiconductor industry.

The ME degree is a 30 semester credit hour program and is awarded upon the successful completion of six core courses, two elective courses, research methods, and an internship. Under certain circumstances, a student may be required to complete more than the minimum number of credits.

Microelectronics

The microelectronics courses cover major aspects of integrated circuit manufacturing technology, such as oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, metalization, plasma etching, etc. These courses emphasize modeling and simulation techniques as well as hands-on laboratory verification of these processes. Students use special software tools for these processes. In the laboratory, students design and fabricate silicon MOS and bipolar integrated circuits, learn how to utilize most of the semiconductor processing equipment, develop and create a process, and manufacture and test their own integrated circuits.

Microlithography

The microlithography courses are advanced courses in the chemistry, physics, and processing involved in microlithography. Optical lithography will be studied through diffraction, Fourier, and image-assessment techniques. Scalar diffraction models will be utilized to simulate aerial image formation and influences of imaging parameters. Positive and negative resist systems as well as processes for IC application will be studied. Advanced topics will include chemically amplified resists; multiple-layer resist systems; phase-shift masks; and electron beam, X-ray, and deep UV lithography.

Laboratory exercises include projection-system design, resist-materials characterization, process optimization, and  electron-beam lithography.

Manufacturing

The manufacturing courses include topics such as scheduling, work-in-progress tracking, costing, inventory control, capital budgeting, productivity measures, and personnel management. Concepts of quality and statistical process control are introduced. The laboratory for this course is the student-run factory functioning within the department. Important issues such as measurement of yield, defect density, wafer mapping, control charts, and other manufacturing measurement tools are examined in lectures and through laboratory work. Computer-integrated manufacturing also is studied in detail. Process modeling, simulation, direct control, computer networking, database systems, linking application programs, facility monitoring, expert systems applications for diagnosis and training, and robotics are supported by laboratory experiences in the integrated circuit factory. An online version of this program exists for engineers employed in the semiconductor industry. Please refer to RIT’s Online Guide for details.

Internship

The program requires students to complete an internship. This requirement provides a structured and supervised work experience that enables students to gain job-related skills that assist them in achieving their desired career goals.

Students with prior engineering-related job experience may submit a request for credit by experience with the department head. Supported by a letter from the appropriate authority substantiating the student’s job responsibility, duration, and performance quality, a student may be able to waive the internship if a previous work experience fulfills this requirement.

For students who are not working in the semiconductor industry while enrolled in this program, the internship can be completed at RIT. It involves an investigation or study of a subject or process directly related to microelectronic engineering under the supervision of a faculty adviser. An internship may be taken any time after the completion of the first semester, and may be designed in a number of ways.  At the conclusion of the internship, submission of a final internship report to the faculty adviser and program director is required.

Program outcomes

After completing the program, students will be able to:

  • Design and understand a sequence of processing steps to fabricate a solid state device to meet a set of geometric, electrical and/or processing parameters.
  • Analyze experimental electrical data from a solid state device to extract performance parameters for comparison to modeling parameters used in the device design.
  • Understand current lithographic materials, processes, and systems to meet imaging and/or device patterning requirements.
  • Understand the relevance of a process or device, either proposed or existing, to current manufacturing practices.
  • Perform in a microelectronic engineering environment, as evidenced by an internship.
  • Appreciate the areas of specialty in the field of microelectronics, such as device engineering, circuit design, lithography, materials and processes, and yield and manufacturing.

Curriculum

Microelectronics manufacturing engineering, ME degree, typical course sequence (semesters), effective fall 2013

Course Sem. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
MCEE-601 Microelectronic Fabrication 3
MCEE-605 Lithography Materials and Processes 3
MCEE -603 Thin Films 3
  Graduate Electives 6
MCEE-795 Microelectronics Research Methods 1
MCEE -732 Evaluation of Microelectronic Manufacturing 3
MCEE-602 VLS Process Modeling 3
MCEE-615 Nanolithography Systems 3
MCEE-795 Microelectronics Research Methods 1
MCEE-777 Microelectronic Engineering Internship 4
Total Semester Credit Hours 30

[arrow] Click to view program requirements in the Quarter Calendar

Quarter Curriculum - For Reference Only

Effective fall 2013, RIT will convert its academic calendar from quarters to semesters. The following content has been made available as reference only. Currently matriculated students who began their academic programs in quarters should consult their academic adviser for guidance and course selection.

Program overview

The master of engineering degree in microelectronics manufacturing engineering provides a broad-based education to students with a bachelor’s degree in traditional engineering or science disciplines who are interested in a career in the semiconductor industry.

The ME degree is awarded upon successful completion of an approved graduate program consisting of a minimum of 45 quarter credit hours. The program consists of one transition course, seven core courses, two approved elective courses, and a minimum of 5 quarter credit hours of internship. Under certain circumstances, a student may be required to complete more than the minimum number of credits. The transition course is in an area other than that in which the BS degree was earned.

Program outcomes

After completion of the program, a student will be able to:

  • Design and understand a sequence of processing steps to fabricate a solid state device to meet a set of geometric, electrical and/or processing parameters.
  • Analyze experimental electrical data from a solid state device to extract performance parameters for comparison to modeling parameters used in the device design.
  • Understand current lithographic materials, processes, and systems to meet imaging and/or device patterning requirements.
  • Understand the relevance of a process or device, either proposed or existing, to current manufacturing practices.
  • Perform in a microelectronic engineering environment, as evidenced by a three-month internship.
  • Appreciate the areas of specialty in the field of microelectronics, such as device engineering, circuit design, lithography, materials and processes, and yield and manufacturing.

Curriculum

Microelectronics manufacturing engineering, MS degree, typical course sequence (quarters)

CourseQtr. Cr. Hrs.
First Year
0305-701 Microelectronics I, Lab 4
0305-721 Microlithography Materials and Processes, Lab 4
  Transition Course 4
0305-702 Microelectronics II, Lab 4
0305-731 Microelectronics Manufacturing I, Lab 4
  Elective 1, 2 8
0305-703 Microelectronics III, Lab 4
0305-722 Microlithography Systems, Lab 4
0305-732 Microelectronics Manufacturing II, Lab 4
  Internship 5
Total Quarter Credit Hours 45

Microelectronics

The Microelectronics I, II, and III course sequence (0305-701, 702, 703) covers major aspects of integrated circuit manufacturing technology, such as oxidation, diffusion, ion implantation, chemical vapor deposition, metalization, plasma etching, etc. These courses emphasize modeling and simulation techniques as well as hands-on laboratory verification of these processes. Students use special software tools for these processes. In the laboratory, students design and fabricate silicon MOS and bipolar integrated circuits, learn how to utilize most of the semiconductor processing equipment, develop and create a process, and manufacture and test their own integrated circuits.

Microlithography

The microlithography courses are advanced courses in the chemistry, physics, and processing involved in microlithography. Optical lithography will be studied through diffraction, Fourier, and image-assessment techniques. Scalar diffraction models will be utilized to simulate aerial image formation and influences of imaging parameters. Positive and negative resist systems as well as processes for IC application will be studied. Advanced topics will include chemically amplified resists; multiple-layer resist systems; phase-shift masks; and electron beam, X-ray, and deep UV lithography.

Laboratory exercises include projection-system design, resist-materials characterization, process optimization, and  electron-beam lithography.

Manufacturing

The manufacturing courses include topics such as scheduling, work-in-progress tracking, costing, inventory control, capital budgeting, productivity measures, and personnel management. Concepts of quality and statistical process control are introduced. The laboratory for this course is the student-run factory functioning within the department. Important issues such as measurement of yield, defect density, wafer mapping, control charts, and other manufacturing measurement tools are examined in lectures and through laboratory work. Computer-integrated manufacturing also is studied in detail. Process modeling, simulation, direct control, computer networking, database systems, linking application programs, facility monitoring, expert systems applications for diagnosis and training, and robotics are supported by laboratory experiences in the integrated circuit factory. An online version of this program exists for engineers employed in the semiconductor industry. Please refer to RIT’s Online Guide for details.

Internship

The program requires a 5 quarter credit hour internship, which is equivalent to at least three months of full-time, successful employment in the semiconductor industry. The internship provides a structured and supervised work experience that enables students to gain job-related skills that assist them in achieving their desired career goals.

Students with prior engineering-related job experience may request “credit by experience.” This request must be made with the department head and supported by a letter from the appropriate authority substantiating the student’s job responsibility, duration, and performance quality.

For students who are not working in the semiconductor industry while enrolled in this program, the internship can be completed at RIT. It involves an investigation or study of a subject or process directly related to microelectronic engineering under the supervision of a faculty adviser. An internship may be taken any time after the completion of the first quarter, must total at least 5 quarter credit hours, and may be designed in a number of ways. For example, one 5 quarter credit hour internship (typically a three-month, full-time work experience), five 1 quarter credit hour experiences, or any combination of separate credits interspersed throughout the graduate program may be used, as long as the total is the equivalent of three months of work. In these cases, full graduate tuition is charged. At the conclusion of the internship, submission of a final internship report to the faculty adviser and program director is required.