J Scott Hawker Headshot

J Scott Hawker

Associate Professor
Department of Software Engineering
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences
Graduate Program Director, Software Engineering

585-475-2705
Office Location

J Scott Hawker

Associate Professor
Department of Software Engineering
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences
Graduate Program Director, Software Engineering

Education

BS, MS, Texas Technical University; Ph.D., Lehigh University

Currently Teaching

SWEN-781
0 Credits
This course provides the student with an opportunity to complete their capstone project, if extra time if needed after enrollment in SWEN-790. The student continues to work closely with his/her adviser.
SWEN-791
0 Credits
This course provides the student with an opportunity to complete their thesis project once having enrolled in both thesis courses (SWEN-794, SWEN-795) if extra time is needed. The student continues to work closely with his/her adviser and thesis committee.
SWEN-790
6 Credits
This course provides the student with an opportunity to execute a thesis project, analyze and document the project in thesis document form. An in-depth study of a software engineering topic will be research focused, having built upon the thesis proposal developed prior to this course. The student is advised by their primary faculty adviser and committee. The thesis and thesis defense is presented for approval by the thesis adviser and committee.
SWEN-780
3 - 6 Credits
This course provides the student with an opportunity to explore a project-based research experience that advances knowledge in that area. The student selects a research problem, conducts background research, develops the system, analyses the results, and builds a professional document and presentation that disseminates the project. The report must include an in-depth research report on a topic selected by the student and in agreement with the student's adviser. The report must be structured as a conference paper, and must be submitted to a conference selected by the student and his/her adviser.
SWEN-746
3 Credits
Software models help the software engineer to understand, specify, and analyze software requirements, designs, and implementations (code components, databases, support files, etc.). Model-driven development is a software engineering practice that uses tool-enabled transformation of requirements models to design models and then to code and associated implementation artifacts. Students will use the Unified Modeling Language (UML) and other modeling techniques to capture software requirements, designs, and implementations. Students will also use formal modeling methods to semi-automatically transform among the various models and to study the quality attributes of the modeled software, such as performance, reliability, security, and other qualities.
SWEN-699
0 Credits
One block of full-time, paid employment in software engineering. See the software engineering graduate program coordinator or RIT's Office of Career Services and Cooperative Education for further details. Completion of all bridge courses and 17 semester hours of graduate courses are required for enrollment.
SWEN-444
3 Credits
This course introduces quantitative models and techniques of human-computer interface analysis, design and evaluation, which are relevant to the software engineering approach of software development. User-focused requirements engineering topics are also covered. Contemporary human computer interaction (HCI) techniques are surveyed, with a focus on when and where they are applicable in the software development process. Students will deliver usable software systems derived from an engineering approach to the application of scientific theory and modeling. Other topics may include usability evaluation design, methods of evaluation, data analysis, social and ethical impacts of usability, prototyping and tools.
SWEN-561
3 Credits
The first course in a two-course, senior-level, capstone project experience. Students work as part of a team to develop solutions to problems posed by either internal or external customers. Problems may require considerable software development or evolution and maintenance of existing software products. Culminates with the completion and presentation of the first major increment of the project solution. Students must have co-op completed to enroll.
SWEN-799
3 - 6 Credits
This course provides the graduate student an opportunity to explore an aspect of software engineering in depth, under the direction of an adviser. The student selects a topic, conducts background research, develops the system, analyses results, and disseminates the project work. The report explains the topic/problem, the student's approach and the results. (Completion of 9 semester hours is needed for enrollment)
SWEN-562
3 Credits
This is the second course in a two-course, senior-level capstone project experience. Students submit one or more additional increments that build upon the solution submitted at the end of the first course. Students make major presentations for both customers as well as technical-oriented audiences, turn over a complete portfolio of project-related artifacts and offer an evaluation of the project and team experience.
SWEN-722
3 Credits
In this course, students will study various lifecycle models for developing software systems. They will study the Software Process Engineering Metamodel (SPEM) standard as a tool for modeling and analyzing engineering processes. Students will use SPEM to characterize various process and organization models and patterns, and they will align these process characteristics to categories of needs for various organizations and projects. The students will study process engineering frameworks and the configuration and assembly of reusable process components into processes. Students will also study how tools and methods support the process. Students will also study software process assessment models, including the Capability Maturity Models, and learn how to identify specific recommendations for an organization to improve their processes. Students will apply their learning to engineer software engineering processes, tools, and methods appropriate for their graduate projects, course projects, and projects for organizations they have worked for.
SWEN-772
3 Credits
This course begins with an exploration of the concepts underlying quality systems and the use of metrics. Students are encouraged to discuss the advantages as well as the limitations of systems and quantitative approaches, with a view to understanding the 40 importance of interpretation in metrics usage and of matching quality systems choices to organizational objectives and culture. They learn the use of modern metrics such as DRE, PCE, COQ/COPQ, reliability objectives and SUMI scores through exercises in analyzing and interpreting charts. This is complemented with a project where they work in teams to design an appropriate quality system for a specific project/organizational situation, and discuss the application and analysis of its evaluation experimentation as a means of improving the quality aspects of subject project/organizational situation.
SWEN-262
3 Credits
An introduction to the principles of the foundations of contemporary software design. Topics include software subsystem modeling, design patterns, design tradeoffs, and component-based software development, with a focus on application of these concepts to concrete design problems. The relationship between design and related process issues such as testing, estimation, and maintenance are also discussed.
SWEN-745
3 Credits
Modeling plays a pivotal role during the software lifecycle during the pre-construction and post-construction activities of the software lifecycle. During the pre-construction stage, models help software engineers understand, specify, and analyze software requirements and designs. During the post-construction stage, models can be used to analyze software systems while in operation. This kind of analysis includes reliability and safety issues as well as timing constraint analysis. (Department approval)
SWEN-383
3 Credits
Quality software designs and architectures reflect software engineering principles that represent best contemporary practice. This course focuses on explicating these fundamental principles, examining a set of design and architecture patterns that embody the principles, and applying patterns appropriate to a design problem in a given context. Restricted to IST majors only.

Select Scholarship

Published Conference Proceedings
Hawker, Scott and E.S. Mesh. "Scientific Software Process Improvement Decisions: A Proposed Research Strategy." Proceedings of the 2013 5th International Workshop on Software Engineering for Computational Science and Engineering. n.p., 2013. Print.
Mesh, Erika S. and J. Scott Hawker. "Scientific Software Process Improvement Decisions: A Proposed Research Strategy." Proceedings of the 2013 Fifth International Workshop on Software Engineering for Computational Science and Engineering. Ed. Jeffrey Carver. San Francisco, CA: IEEE, 2013. Print.
Published Article
Hawker, J. Scott et al. “An Integrated Model to Study Environmental, Economic, and Energy Trade-Offs in Intermodal Freight Transportation,” iEMSs International Congress on Environmental Modelingand Software. 2010. n.p. Web. † ≠ *