Larry Kiser Headshot

Larry Kiser

Senior Lecturer
Department of Software Engineering
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

585-230-4400
Office Location
Office Mailing Address
1 Lomb Memorial Drive

Larry Kiser

Senior Lecturer
Department of Software Engineering
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Education

BS, Roberts Wesleyan College; MS, Rochester Institute of Technology

Bio

I am a Lecturer in the Software Engineering department with well over 30 years of software development experience with an emphasis in real-time and embedded systems. I particularly enjoy working on projects that include science, hardware, and software.

585-230-4400

Personal Links

Currently Teaching

SWEN-340
3 Credits
To design and develop high quality products software engineers need to understand the physical components and systems that are an integral part of these products. This understanding is critical in the fulfillment of non-functional requirements such as performance, reliability and security. This course will provide software engineering students with hardware, computer architecture, and networking domain specific knowledge. Course programming assignments will provide practical experience developing software that interfaces with hardware components and systems.
SWEN-565
3 Credits
This course discusses issues of performance in real-time and embedded systems. Techniques for profiling the resource usage of a system and for measuring the effect of increasing system requirements will be covered. The control of physical systems will motivate the need for performance tuning of a real-time system. Students will write programs running under a real-time operating system that can maintain control of a physical system. The course will discuss and experiment with performance trade-offs that can be made using hardware-software co-design.
SWEN-444
3 Credits
This course introduces quantitative models and techniques of human-computer interface analysis, design and evaluation, which are relevant to the software engineering approach of software development. User-focused requirements engineering topics are also covered. Contemporary human computer interaction (HCI) techniques are surveyed, with a focus on when and where they are applicable in the software development process. Students will deliver usable software systems derived from an engineering approach to the application of scientific theory and modeling. Other topics may include usability evaluation design, methods of evaluation, data analysis, social and ethical impacts of usability, prototyping and tools.
SWEN-561
3 Credits
The first course in a two-course, senior-level, capstone project experience. Students work as part of a team to develop solutions to problems posed by either internal or external customers. Problems may require considerable software development or evolution and maintenance of existing software products. Culminates with the completion and presentation of the first major increment of the project solution. Students must have co-op completed to enroll.
SWEN-563
3 Credits
This course provides a general introduction to real-time and embedded systems. It will introduce a representative family of microcontrollers and require students to program on these devices. Fundamental material on real-time operating systems, such as requirements specification, scheduling algorithms and priority inversion avoidance will be presented. The features of a commercial real-time operating system will be discussed and used for course projects.
SWEN-261
3 Credits
An introductory course in software engineering, emphasizing the organizational aspects of software development and software design and implementation by individuals and small teams within a process/product framework. Topics include the software lifecycle, software design, user interface issues, specification and implementation of components, assessing design quality, design reviews and code inspections, software testing, basic support tools, technical communications and system documentation, team-based development. A term-long, team-based project done in a studio format is used to reinforce concepts presented in class.
SWEN-562
3 Credits
This is the second course in a two-course, senior-level capstone project experience. Students submit one or more additional increments that build upon the solution submitted at the end of the first course. Students make major presentations for both customers as well as technical-oriented audiences, turn over a complete portfolio of project-related artifacts and offer an evaluation of the project and team experience.
SWEN-799
3 - 6 Credits
This course provides the graduate student an opportunity to explore an aspect of software engineering in depth, under the direction of an adviser. The student selects a topic, conducts background research, develops the system, analyses results, and disseminates the project work. The report explains the topic/problem, the student's approach and the results. (Completion of 9 semester hours is needed for enrollment)
SWEN-564
3 Credits
This course introduces the modeling of real-time software systems.? It takes an engineering approach to the design of these systems by analyzing system models before beginning implementation.? UML will be the primary modeling methodology. Non-UML methodologies will also be discussed.? Implementations of real-time systems will be developed manually from the models and using automated tools to generate the code.
EEEE-664
3 Credits
This course discusses issues of performance in real-time and embedded systems. Techniques for profiling the resource usage of a system and for measuring the effect of increasing system requirements will be covered. The control of physical systems will motivate the need for performance tuning of a real-time system. Students will write programs running under a real-time operating system that can maintain control of a physical system. The course will discuss and experiment with performance trade-offs that can be made using hardware-software co-design.
EEEE-665
3 Credits
This course introduces the modeling of real-time software systems. It takes an engineering approach to the design of these systems by analyzing system models before beginning implementation. UML will be the primary modeling methodology. Non-UML methodologies will also be discussed. Implementations of real-time systems will be developed manually from the models and using automated tools to generate the code.
ISTE-222
3 Credits
The third course in the programming sequence expanding the student’s knowledge base of higher level programming concepts including data structures, algorithm development and analysis, Big-O notation, directed graphs, priority queues, performance, and a greater understanding of how complex software can more easily be designed. Programming assignments are required.
CMPE-664
3 Credits
This course introduces the modeling of real-time software systems. It takes an engineering approach to the design of these systems by analyzing system models before beginning implementation. UML will be the primary modeling methodology. Non-UML methodologies will also be discussed. Implementations of real-time systems will be developed manually from the models and using automated tools to generate the code.
CMPE-240
4 Credits
This course introduces the computer engineering fundamentals upon which current computer systems are based. Discussion of the machine-level representation of data, Boolean algebra and simple logic circuits describes the hardware foundations for modern computer systems. An introduction to instruction set design and assembly language provides the student with an understanding of the interface between hardware and software. The course concludes by discussing high-level architectural design and networking emphasizing its effect on program performance.
CMPE-665
3 Credits
This course discusses issues of performance in real-time and embedded systems. Techniques for profiling the resource usage of a system and for measuring the effect of increasing system requirements will be covered. The control of physical systems will motivate the need for performance tuning of a real-time system. Students will write programs running under a real-time operating system that can maintain control of a physical system. The course will discuss and experiment with performance trade-offs that can be made using hardware-software co-design.
SWEN-440
3 Credits
Principles and practices related to identifying software system stakeholders, eliciting functional and quality requirements, translating requirements into architectural structures, and analyzing candidate architectures with respect to the requirements.
CMPE-663
3 Credits
This first course in a graduate elective sequence will begin by presenting a general road map of real-time and embedded systems. The course will be conducted in a studio class/lab format with lecture material interspersed with laboratory work. This course will introduce a representative family of microcontrollers that will exemplify unique positive features as well as limitations of microcontrollers in embedded and real-time systems. These microcontrollers will then be used as external, independent performance monitors of more complex real-time systems. The majority of the course will present material on a commercial real-time operating system and using it for programming projects on development systems and embedded target systems. Some fundamental material on real-time operating systems and multiprocessor considerations for real-time systems will also be presented. Examples include scheduling algorithms, priority inversion, and hardware-software co-design.
EEEE-663
3 Credits
This first course in a graduate elective sequence will begin by presenting a general road map of real-time and embedded systems. The course will be conducted in a studio class/lab format with lecture material interspersed with laboratory work. This course will introduce a representative family of microcontrollers that will exemplify unique positive features as well as limitations of microcontrollers in embedded and real-time systems. These microcontrollers will then be used as external, independent performance monitors of more complex real-time systems. The majority of the course will present material on a commercial real-time operating system and using it for programming projects on development systems and embedded target systems. Some fundamental material on real-time operating systems and multiprocessor considerations for real-time systems will also be presented. Examples include scheduling algorithms, priority inversion, and hardware-software co-design.
SWEN-250
3 Credits
This is a project-based course to enhance individual, technical engineering knowledge and skills as preparation for upper-division team-based coursework. Topics include adapting to new languages, tools and technologies; developing and analyzing models as a prelude to implementation; software construction concepts (proper documentation, implementing to standards etc.); unit and integration testing; component-level estimation; and software engineering professionalism.