Sean Boyle Headshot

Sean Boyle

Senior Lecturer
School of Interactive Games and Media
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Office Location

Sean Boyle

Senior Lecturer
School of Interactive Games and Media
Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences

Education

BS, MS, Rochester Institute of Technology

Bio

Sean graduated with an MS in Information Technology in May of 2001, and started teaching Multimedia at RIT in the fall of 2001. In 2006, he began working at Element K as an instructional designer, involved in developing interactive courseware for online and in-class instruction, as well as business simulations and "serious games" in both tabletop and digital formats. At the same time, he founded Tremorworks, a small, independent publisher of tabletop board and role-playing games. In 2009 he returned to teaching at RIT full-time, and now teaches Web and game design in the School of Interactive Games and Media.

Currently Teaching

IGME-320
3 Credits
This course continues to examine the core theories of game design as they relate to the professional field. Beginning with a formalized pitch process, this course examines the design and development paradigm from story-boarding and pre-visualization through rapid iteration, refinement, and structured prototyping exercises to further examine the validity of a given design. Specific emphasis is placed on iterative prototyping models, and on methodologies for both informal and formal critique. This course also explores production techniques and life-cycle in the professional industry.
IGME-624
3 Credits
This course explores the concepts and mechanics of analog role-playing games, such as tabletop "pencil-and-paper" and live-action role-playing games, from a practical, hands-on perspective. In this project-based course, students will develop their own rule systems to facilitate various facets of role-playing and associated game mechanics, then playtest and publish their games. Students will also use desktop publishing tools to produce game rules and supplemental materials suitable for publication. Note that this course assumes that students have extensive experience in playing tabletop role-playing games.
IGME-220
3 Credits
This course examines the core process of game design, from ideation and structured brainstorming in an entertainment technology context through the examination of industry standard processes and techniques for documenting and managing the design process. This course specifically examines techniques for assessing and quantifying the validity of a given design, for managing innovation and creativity in a game development-specific context, and for world and character design. Specific emphasis is placed on both the examination and deconstruction of historical successes and failures, along with presentation of ethical and cultural issues related to the design and development of interactive software and the role of individuals in a team-oriented design methodology. Students in this class are expected to actively participate and engage in the culture of design and critique as it relates to the field.
IGME-421
3 Credits
This course explores issues pertaining to design, mechanics, development, and production of analog, tabletop hobby games, which include board games, card games, wargames, and other non-digital games catering to multiple players. Students will analyze and apply concepts and mechanics of modern tabletop game design, and build and test tabletop games. Students will work with development and prototyping tools, explore component design and art direction, and work with desktop publishing technologies. In addition, they will work directly with board game publishing and manufacturing technologies and services, and study factors pertaining to the business of tabletop games.
IGME-599
1 - 6 Credits
The student will work independently under the supervision of a faculty advisor on a topic not covered in other courses.
IGME-799
1 - 6 Credits
The student will work independently under the supervision of a faculty adviser on a topic not covered in other courses.
IGME-580
3 Credits
This course will allow students to work as domain specialists on teams completing one or more large projects over the course of the semester. The projects will be relevant to experiences of the interactive games and media programs, but will require expertise in a variety of sub-domains, including web design and development, social computing, computer game development, multi-user media, human-computer interaction and streaming media. Students will learn to apply concepts of project management and scheduling, production roles and responsibilities, and their domain skill sets to multidisciplinary projects. Students will complete design documents, progress reports and final assessments of themselves and their teammates in addition to completing their assigned responsibilities on the main projects.