Evelina Miscin Headshot

Evelina Miscin

Professional studies professor-tenure

RIT Croatia

Evelina Miscin

Professional studies professor-tenure

RIT Croatia

Select Scholarship

Journal Paper
Miščin, Evelina. "Errors in Presentations of Medical English Students." Značenje u jeziku - od individualnoga do kolektivnoga. (2020): 195-210. Print.
Miščin, Evelina. "Using Video Clips from \'Real Doctor Reactions\' for Teaching Medical English." EALTHY. (2020): 23-25. Web.
Miščin, Evelina. "Collocational Errors of Financial Management Students." Zbornik radova s međunarodnoga znanstvenog skupa hrvatskog društva za primijenjenu lingvistiku. (2016): 221-235. Print.
Published Conference Proceedings
Miščin, Evelina. "Errors in Presentations of Medical English Students." Proceedings of the Meaning in Literature - From Individual to Collective. Ed. Mihaela Matešić and Blaženka Martinović. Zagreb, ___: HDPL, 2020. Print.
Evelina, Miščin,. "Teaching Academic English Writing- Challenges and Obstacles." Proceedings of the HDPL, Rijeka May 2018. Ed. Matešić. Rijeka, Croatia: n.p., Print.
Miščin, Evelina. "Creating Medical Glossary for Classroom Purposes." Proceedings of the Language and mind - Croatian Association of Applied Linguistics, May, 2018. Ed. Anastazija Vlastelić and Mihaela Matešić. Rijeka, Croatia: n.p., Print.
Miščin, Evelina. "Error Analysis of Written English Essays." Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Humanistic Studies 2019, Cuba, June 2019. Ed. University of Santa Clara. Santa Clara, Cuba: n.p., Web.
Miščin, Evelina. "Kolokacijska kompetencija studenata medicinskog i poslovnog engleskog jezika." Proceedings of the Od teorije do prakse u jeziku struke. Ed. Darija Omrčen and Vesna Cigan. Zagreb, Croatia: n.p., 2016. Print.

Currently Teaching

ENGL-210
3 Credits
In this course, students will study literature, movements, and writers within their cultural contexts and in relation to modes of literary production and circulation. Students will hone their skills as attentive readers and will engage with literary analysis and cultural criticism. The class will incorporate various literary, cultural, and interdisciplinary theories--such as psychoanalytic theory, feminist and queer theories, critical race studies, and postcolonial theory. Using these theoretical frameworks in order to study texts, students will gain a strong foundation for analyzing the ways literary language functions and exploring the interrelations among literature, culture, and history. In doing so, they will engage issues involving culture, identity, language, ethics, race, gender, class, and globalism, among many others.
ENGL-312
3 Credits
This course presents a study of American literature by engaging in critically informed analysis of texts that emerged from within the geography, history, and cultures that constitute the modern United States. This includes work by colonial writers, Native American writers, African American writers, and writers from the many other ethnic and racial groups who have immigrated to and comprised the fabric of American culture. One of the goals of the class is to analyze and discuss the works in their respective socio-historical contexts, with a special focus on the ways in which individual works belong to a distinctly American literary tradition. Specific literary works studied will vary depending on the instructor. The course can be repeated up to 2 times, for 6 semester credit hours, as long as the topics are different.
ENGL-411
3 Credits
The course introduces students to American literature by tracing a particular theme through a historical survey of canonical, non-canonical, and contemporary novels, stories, poetry, and drama, as well as non-fiction forms (speeches, autobiographies, essays, etc.). Students will gain a broad understanding of American literary trends while also gaining a deep understanding of the given themes. These themes will be broadly conceived, but will also lend themselves to social, cultural, and political questions. These themes may include but are not limited to horror, gardens and machines, natives and strangers, borders, etc. While these themes deal with abstract or conceptual ideas, they lead to questions about gender, race, ethnicity, empire, and other historical problems in debates over American exceptionalism, empire, and ideology.
UWRT-100
3 Credits
Critical Reading and Writing is a one semester, three-credit course limited to 15 students per section. This course is designed to help students develop the literacy practices they will need to be successful in their First-Year Writing course. Students will read, understand, interpret, and synthesize a variety of texts. Assignments are designed to challenge students intellectually, culturally and rhetorically. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will improve their writing by developing academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened in First-Year Writing. Particular attention will be given to critical reading, academic writing conventions, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity in academic writing. This course fulfills a Gen Ed free elective.
UWRT-150
3 Credits
Writing Seminar is a three-credit course limited to 19 students per section. The course is designed to develop first-year students’ proficiency in analytical and rhetorical reading and writing, and critical thinking. Students will read, understand, and interpret a variety of non-fiction texts representing different cultural perspectives and/or academic disciplines. These texts are designed to challenge students intellectually and to stimulate their writing for a variety of contexts and purposes. Through inquiry-based assignment sequences, students will develop academic research and literacy practices that will be further strengthened throughout their academic careers. Particular attention will be given to the writing process, including an emphasis on teacher-student conferencing, critical self-assessment, class discussion, peer review, formal and informal writing, research, and revision. Small class size promotes frequent student-instructor and student-student interaction. The course also emphasizes the principles of intellectual property and academic integrity for both current academic and future professional writing.